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Specimen preparation

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  • Matthew McKinney
    I have washed several specimens and placed them back in fresh EtOH. When I remove the specimens to dry them is it OK to dry them straight out of EtOH or should
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 25, 2011
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      I have washed several specimens and placed them back in fresh EtOH.
      When I remove the specimens to dry them is it OK to dry them straight
      out of EtOH or should they be washed again? (I will be drying them
      with a blow dryer).
      -Matthew McKinney
    • J B
      When I was at Sam Droege s lab, Sam made us wash the bees. so thay is what I would do. -- Jacob
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 26, 2011
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        When I was at Sam Droege's lab, Sam made us wash the bees. so thay is what I would do.

        --

        Jacob


      • Drons, David J
        I have no idea why my earlier reply did not get posted. The alcohol replaces the water, allowing the bees to dry a bit faster. Wash, rinse, alcohol rinse,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 26, 2011
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          I have no idea why my earlier reply did not get posted.


          The alcohol replaces the water, allowing the bees to dry a bit faster.

          Wash, rinse, alcohol rinse, dry.

          good luck

          - David Drons
        • bezray@surewest.net
          Hello, My name is Briana Ezray and I am working with the Oregon Department of Agriculture. I am conducting a survey of native bees in the Willamette Valley.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 27, 2011
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            Hello,
            My name is Briana Ezray and I am working with the Oregon Department of
            Agriculture. I am conducting a survey of native bees in the
            Willamette Valley. I was wondering if anyone had a list of Oregon species?
            If so, I was wondering if there was any way I could get a copy?
            Thank you,
            Briana Ezray
          • John S. Ascher
            Briana, You and others may be interested to know that I have compiled unpublished lists of described bee species for all states (of the USA and Mexico among
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 27, 2011
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              Briana,

              You and others may be interested to know that I have compiled unpublished
              lists of described bee species for all states (of the USA and Mexico among
              other countries), with help from Sam Droege, Terry Griswold, and many
              other specialists, and am happy to share these with interested people
              provided they treat the unpublished data with due care and above all agree
              to cite any uses appropriately. Since the data are unpublished, proper
              citation may be complex, as various print, online, and unpublished sources
              of records (including pers. comm.) and compilations of these may need to
              be credited.
              My main concern is that people 1) cite print sources to the extent
              relevant rather than solely citing online compilations and 2) credit
              primary sources of data rather than online or other compilations alone,
              and 3) cite the online sources correctly and with an understanding of the
              different data providers involved (NOTE: there are NO Discover Life
              records. All have an individual data provider who is solely responsible
              for their content and its accuracy or lack thereof).

              Note that all of the state records are mapping online in my AMNH_BEES
              (plural) literature database mapped in its entirety here:

              http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20m?kind=AMNH_BEES

              State records for bee species as I understand them based on the literature
              (published or otherwise), museum studies, and correspondence can be
              compiled by clicking on all possible species to see if an AMNH_BEES
              records exists for the state (or in some cases a subset of the state such
              as records for "Southern California"), but of course it would be very much
              easier if I sent an Excel file of the list with names cited in full,
              including family-group placement and subgeneric placements if relevant.
              Please email me if you require a draft state list and are willing to abide
              by the requirement of proper citation of all relevant compilers and data
              sources.

              Note also that many state records in addition to those found in my
              AMNH_BEES files can be found mapping on Discover Life based on records in
              GBIF or KSEM (University of Kansas) databases. In my experience, most of
              these records are erroneous and should not be accepted without further
              verification. Many such additional state records are based on outdated
              taxonomy or identification criteria or are otherwise clearly erroneous,
              but unfortunately there is no mechanism that I know of that ensures that
              records flagged as erroneous in GBIF or KSEM databases will be updated
              within a timely fashion (i.e within several years).

              I'm very interested in any additions and corrections to all state lists.
              Many of you have been very generously sharing data with me directly or
              indirectly through Sam, Terry, Rob Jean, and other colleagues, but I know
              there are many additional confirmed or potential records of interest out
              there and would love to discuss them.

              Regarding the Oregon bee species list, I am aware of several colleagues
              interested in improving this at Oregon State and elsewhere across the
              region, and it would be great if we could share a draft list through an
              email list and then improve it collectively. If anyone else has a draft
              Oregon list it would be very useful to compare it with mine (which
              includes data from Terry's BBSL group) and to reconcile any discrepancies.

              John






              John


              > Hello,
              > My name is Briana Ezray and I am working with the Oregon Department of
              > Agriculture. I am conducting a survey of native bees in the
              > Willamette Valley. I was wondering if anyone had a list of Oregon
              > species?
              > If so, I was wondering if there was any way I could get a copy?
              > Thank you,
              > Briana Ezray
              >
              >


              --
              John S. Ascher, Ph.D.
              Bee Database Project Manager
              Division of Invertebrate Zoology
              American Museum of Natural History
              Central Park West @ 79th St.
              New York, NY 10024-5192
              work phone: 212-496-3447
              mobile phone: 917-407-0378
            • Ray K Geroff
              I would say your answer is no to having to wash them a second time, I wash them and store them and then just dry them right out of the ETOH. -Ray ... From:
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 28, 2011
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                I would say your answer is no to having to wash them a second time, I wash them and store them and then just dry them right out of the ETOH.

                -Ray

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "David J Drons" <David.Drons@...>
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 6:48:47 PM
                Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Specimen preparation







                I have no idea why my earlier reply did not get posted.

                The alcohol replaces the water, allowing the bees to dry a bit faster.

                Wash, rinse, alcohol rinse, dry.

                good luck

                - David Drons
              • Nicholas Stewart
                Hello again, As do I - well, my designated bee-hair-stylists - only washing once in succinct increments of whatever samples at hand (discrete, individual
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 29, 2011
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                  Hello again,

                  As do I - well, my designated 'bee-hair-stylists'' - only washing once in succinct increments of whatever samples at hand (discrete, individual samples - I urge no mixing) fight within each of the nine tea-strainer-balls accounting for (1) session. 30sec - 1min of good shaking within warm-soapy water, followed by another 30 sec-1 min of shaking in non-soapy water, ultimately culminating in the portion from which I get the most negative feedback about: the hair drying. This, while the tea-balls help to cut potential loss/damages to zero, the act of drying is by far the most vital to the whole process properly being performed. But, without proper drying, all that time having washed & dried has become a complete waste/useless, as its that swift current of consistent warm air that tufts the hair up so nicely, many ultimately look as if they've been plucked straight from a flower! 

                  Rather than devote all that individual, intensive man-hour power to literally blow-drying the tea-balls, I've implemented the use of electric pumps, like those sold w/ (and separately) air mattresses - these powerful little devils make quick work of nine-tea-balls w/out any direct attention beyond hanging the balls & flicking the switch. In fact, that one implement revolutionized the process midway through determinations in 2010, taking two to three devoted team members off an all day, three days a week chore, & the productivity of the four dryers we've finally maxed out on now trump my own taxonomic prowess/speed - again freeing my helpers to myriad other things (&/or more grant money which can be used on field work payrolls)!
                  Logo - Updated - 3-6-11.png
                   Nicholas G. Stewart
                  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Georgia Native Fruit Tree -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                  -------------------------------- Pollinator Biodiversity Assessment, 
                  (2010-13) 
                  ----------------- Managing Native Pollinator Species Richness:   Efforts in Sustainable, Native Pollination Services ------- 
                       Project Design   ---   Lead Field Researcher   ---   Primary Taxonomist
                  nick.s2art@...   *(PRIMARY)*    
                  nstewart@...                                                                                         (404) 784-6236      

                  On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Ray K Geroff <rk-geroff@...> wrote:
                   

                  I would say your answer is no to having to wash them a second time, I wash them and store them and then just dry them right out of the ETOH.

                  -Ray



                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "David J Drons" <David.Drons@...>
                  To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 6:48:47 PM
                  Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Specimen preparation

                  I have no idea why my earlier reply did not get posted.

                  The alcohol replaces the water, allowing the bees to dry a bit faster.

                  Wash, rinse, alcohol rinse, dry.

                  good luck

                  - David Drons




                  --
                         

                • Zarrillo, Tracy
                  Hi Nicholas, I was wondering if you can post a photo(s) of your tea-ball/electric pump method of hair-styling . I have tried without success to rig up a
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 2, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Nicholas,

                    I was wondering if you can post a photo(s) of your tea-ball/electric pump method of "hair-styling". I have tried without success to rig up a variety of drying methods to save time, such as turning an old seed cleaner into a 'salon', and jerry-rigging a stand for my blow-dryer and drying jar out of a sink drying rack. Most genera did dry well with the drying rack set up, however Bombus required more TLC. I have not found a more satisfactory way to get them to fluff up save putting them into a jar, manually shaking them up like a cocktail, and blowdrying them for at least 3-5 minutes. I have even gone through the trouble of making "dryer balls" out of paper towels to add a bit more friction for the stubborn ones. As I am going to have lots of Bombus this field season to deal with, my colleagues and I are desperate to find an efficient method to deal with drying these fusspots. Thanks for the idea!

                    Tracy

                    Tracy Zarrillo
                    The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
                    123 Huntington Street
                    New Haven, CT 06511
                    Tracy.Zarrillo@...
                    (203) 974-8473

                    ________________________________________
                    From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nicholas Stewart [nick.s2art@...]
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2011 5:04 AM
                    To: Ray K Geroff; mm.entomology@...; Stewart; Sam Droege; John Pickering; bd7954@...; David.Drons@...; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Re: Specimen preparation

                    Hello again,

                    As do I - well, my designated 'bee-hair-stylists'' - only washing once in succinct increments of whatever samples at hand (discrete, individual samples - I urge no mixing) fight within each of the nine tea-strainer-balls accounting for (1) session. 30sec - 1min of good shaking within warm-soapy water, followed by another 30 sec-1 min of shaking in non-soapy water, ultimately culminating in the portion from which I get the most negative feedback about: the hair drying. This, while the tea-balls help to cut potential loss/damages to zero, the act of drying is by far the most vital to the whole process properly being performed. But, without proper drying, all that time having washed & dried has become a complete waste/useless, as its that swift current of consistent warm air that tufts the hair up so nicely, many ultimately look as if they've been plucked straight from a flower!

                    Rather than devote all that individual, intensive man-hour power to literally blow-drying the tea-balls, I've implemented the use of electric pumps, like those sold w/ (and separately) air mattresses - these powerful little devils make quick work of nine-tea-balls w/out any direct attention beyond hanging the balls & flicking the switch. In fact, that one implement revolutionized the process midway through determinations in 2010, taking two to three devoted team members off an all day, three days a week chore, & the productivity of the four dryers we've finally maxed out on now trump my own taxonomic prowess/speed - again freeing my helpers to myriad other things (&/or more grant money which can be used on field work payrolls)!
                    [cid:ii_130daa077c8f65b4]
                    Nicholas G. Stewart
                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Georgia Native Fruit Tree -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                    -------------------------------- Pollinator Biodiversity Assessment,
                    (2010-13)
                    ----------------- Managing Native Pollinator Species Richness: Efforts in Sustainable, Native Pollination Services -------
                    Project Design --- Lead Field Researcher --- Primary Taxonomist
                    nick.s2art@...<mailto:nick.s2art@...> *(PRIMARY)*
                    nstewart@...<mailto:nstewart@...> (404) 784-6236

                    On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Ray K Geroff <rk-geroff@...<mailto:rk-geroff@...>> wrote:


                    I would say your answer is no to having to wash them a second time, I wash them and store them and then just dry them right out of the ETOH.

                    -Ray


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "David J Drons" <David.Drons@...<mailto:David.Drons%40sdstate.edu>>
                    To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com<mailto:beemonitoring%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 6:48:47 PM
                    Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Specimen preparation

                    I have no idea why my earlier reply did not get posted.

                    The alcohol replaces the water, allowing the bees to dry a bit faster.

                    Wash, rinse, alcohol rinse, dry.

                    good luck

                    - David Drons




                    --
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