Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

DiscoverLife Bee Genera Guide Update 6/13/11, and female Caupolicana vs Zikanapis

Expand Messages
  • Michael Orr
    Hello, Once again, many of these characters were influenced by Michener s BOTW. Specimens were examined for all taxa but Nesosphecodes. As always, please let
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 13, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,


      Once again, many of these characters were influenced by Michener's BOTW. Specimens were examined for all taxa but Nesosphecodes. As always, please let me know if you have any comments or suggestions.

      The pair of Caupolicana and Zikanapis has proven problematic, as the one specimen available to me is in very poor shape and male. I haven't been able to find any strong characters for differentiating females of the two groups, so any information regarding their distinction would be greatly appreciated.


      Conanthalictus vs Halictus
      Conanthalictus - Male mandible with a multi-dentate or truncated process found about halfway down the upper edge of the mandible - Males without a yellow border on the apical rim of the clypeus - The dorsal face of the propodeum, the area directly posterior to the metanotum, is very clearly longitudinally longer than the scutellum when measuring both at the middle - In direct comparison, with much sparser apical hair bands on the terga which are usually interrupted medially
      Halictus - Mandible either simple or with an inferior subapical tooth set back from the tip - Males usually with a yellow border on the apical rim of the clypeus - The dorsal face of the propodeum is, at most, equal in longitudinal length to the scutellum when measuring both at the middle, although it is more often much shorter than the scutellum - In direct comparison, with much denser apical hair bands on the terga which are only rarely interrupted medially


      Halictus vs Mexalictus
      Halictus - Paraocular lobe only obtusely protruding into the clypeus, if at all - Terga with distinct, light hair bands present along the apical rim - In direct comparison, with much more robust bodies
      Mexalictus - Paraocular lobe protruding down onto the clypeus acutely or almost acutely, as is seen in some Augochlorines - Hairs of terga scattered, not forming apical hair bands - In direct comparison, much more slender, appearing similar to some thinner Lasioglossum in terms of body shape


      Lasioglossum vs Nesosphecodes
      Lasioglossum - Wing venation distinctly weakened in at least the third transcubital vein, often in the second transcubital vein as well, the weakened vein appearing to be a single line when viewed under 20X or greater power
      Nesosphecodes - Wing venation equally strong in all three transcubital veins, these veins each appearing, at 20X or greater power, to be  composed of 2 lines


      Hexepeolus vs Triopasites
      Hexepeolus - Strong white apical hair bands present on the tergites, these bands dense enough to obscure the surface of the integument and very narrowly interrupted at the center - Female S6 with a large, rounded lobe, directed posteriorly, to each side of a deep medial emargination - In direct comparison, a much blacker bee, with only some slight reddening of the legs and abdomen present sometimes
      Triopasites - Weak white apical hair bands present, the integument clearly visible through the hair band, usually weakest on T2 where the band is widely interrupted by about half the latitudinal width of the rim or more - Female with S6 apically bidentate in the center of the rim, these two tips appearing distinctly pointed and somewhat rod-like - In direct comparison, a much more overall red bee, the abdomen usually entirely red along with the legs and much of the thorax, although sometimes there may be some blackening throughout


      Leiopodus vs Mesoplia
      Leiopodus - Tibial spur of midleg with a tip that is NOT bifurcate, with only one tip as in most bee genera - Legs brown, black, or sometimes reddish orange - Abdomen black or brownish - Most often with latitudinally COMPLETE OR NARROWLY INTERRUPTED light hair bands, when these hair bands are interrupted the gap is less than half of the latitudinal width of the tergite
      Mesoplia - Tibial spur of midleg with TWO DISTINCT TIPS, one of which is clearly longer than the other - Legs most often with some blue or greenish metallic reflections - Abdomen with obvious BLUE OR GREEN integumental coloration that has at least some metallic reflection, although in some species it is only slight - If with any light hair patches on the terga, they are usually WIDELY interrupted such that more than half the latitudinal width of the terga is bare


      Conanthalictus vs Sphecodes
      Conanthalictus - MALE often with a distinctly MULTI-FACETED SUBAPICAL TOOTH along the upper margin of the mandible which appears to have several small teeth arising from it, usually located about one third of the length of the mandible from its tip - The apical rim of the clypeus very SHORT, its latitudinal width equal to more than twice the clypeal length - Pronotal lobe rounded, not divided between the anterior and posterior areas by a strong ridge - Body very finely tessellate throughout, giving its integument the appearance of extremely fine sandpaper, and without the kind of coarse sculpturing that can be seen on the propodeum of Sphecodes
      Sphecodes - MALE WITHOUT a multi-faceted subapical tooth that appears to have multiple teeth on it, although often with a simple subapical tooth which appears to be little more than a bump or jutting angle along the upper margin of the mandible - Clypeus LONGER, usually less than twice as wide as long - Pronotal lobe strongly CARINATE, the dorsal area found posteriorly is divided from the anterior area of the pronotum by a well-defined ridge - Body overall much more COARSELY SCULPTURED, this being especially true on the propodeum where it is almost always AREOLATE


      Male, Caupolicana vs Zikanapis
      Caupolicana - LONG hair present at the lateroventral corners of T2-5, past the downward bend around the sides of the abdomen - S6 most often BROADLY ROUNDED along the rim, rarely with a V-shaped notch present medially, but if so then the rim is not produced as much as in Zikanapis
      Zikanapis - Dulled, scarcely-pitted areas present at the lateroventral corners of T2-5 past the downward bend around the sides of the abdomen, these areas at most with very SHORT and dense hairs of uniform length - S6 with an apicomedial projection that has a distinct V-SHAPED NOTCH, although the projection may sometimes appear weak


      Brachynomada vs Triopasites
      Brachynomada - Forewing with either TWO OR THREE submarginal cells - The center of the rim of S1 is only weakly triangular such that , if at all, and the rim lies relatively flat against the base of S2 without being reflexed and pointing ventrally - Males of the subgenus Melanomada have a small spike present near the base of the hind femur, on the lower side - In direct comparison, usually DARKER BLACKISH bees, although some are also variably reddened
      Triopasites - Forewing with THREE submarginal cells - At the center of the rim of S1, the somewhat medially flattened, but generally triangular projection is reflexed such that, at the rim, it appears to be pointing ventrally  - Males do not have a small spike near the base of the hind femur - In direct comparison, more REDDISH than many Brachynomada species, with red being the primary integumental color in nearly all specimens observed


      Macrotera and Perdita vs other selected genera
      Macrotera and Perdita - Marginal cell unusually SHORT, the distance the submarginal cell extends along the margin of the wing is approximately half that of the distance from the wing tip to the tip of the submarginal cell - Most often with two submarginal cells, but sometimes with one or when with three cells with the second cell reduced to a small triangle - Second submarginal cell, the third if with the small second intermediary cell, short, with its greatest length USUALLY less than two-thirds that of the first submarginal cell - Hind tibia of male only very rarely toothed on the upper margin
      Other selected genera - Marginal cell relatively LONG, usually clearly occupying more than half the distance from the tip of the marginal cell to the apex of the wing along the length of the margin of the wing  - Hind tibia of male most often, but not always, toothed or at least carinate on the upper margin (Panurginus, Pseudopanurgus)


      -Michael
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.