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Bumble Bees

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  • Joe Metzger
    Members, When I was on the Discover Life website, I tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which I had seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 27, 2007
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      Members,
       
                When I was on the Discover Life website, I tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which I had seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years ago. I didn't know what characters were important, so I didn't write down the right information. One of the things I did write down was that one had a full pollen sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula) and the other had none visible at all. I thought the one without a pollen sac might be in the genus Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. While the key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the genus (?) Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm assuming is in the Dipteran family Bombylliidae), as well as the bee genera Bombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa, it didn't include the genus Psithyris. Was there a name change, was it an oversight, aren't members of this genus within the range of the key?
       
                                                        Joe Metzger


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    • David Inouye
      Joe - males don t have corbiculae, so if you were observing bees after late summer you might have seen males. David Inouye At 06:06 AM 11/27/2007, you wrote:
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 27, 2007
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        Joe - males don't have corbiculae, so if you were observing bees after late summer you might have seen males. 

        David Inouye

        At 06:06 AM 11/27/2007, you wrote:

        Members,
         
                  When I was on the Discover Life website, I tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which I had seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years ago. I didn't know what characters were important, so I didn't write down the right information. One of the things I did write down was that one had a full pollen sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula) and the other had none visible at all. I thought the one without a pollen sac might be in the genus Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. While the key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the genus (?) Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm assuming is in the Dipteran family Bombylliidae), as well as the bee genera Bombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa, it didn't include the genus Psithyris. Was there a name change, was it an oversight, aren't members of this genus within the range of the key! ! ?
         
                                                          Joe Metzger
      • Jack Neff
        Joe: Recent studies have shown that recognizing Psithyrus at the generic level renders Bombus paraphyletic. In modern classifications, Psithyrus is now just
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 27, 2007
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          Joe: Recent studies have shown that recognizing
          Psithyrus at the generic level renders Bombus
          paraphyletic. In modern classifications, Psithyrus
          is now just one of the many subgenera of Bombus.


          Jack Neff


          Members,

          When I was on theDiscover Life website, I
          tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which Ihad
          seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years
          ago. I didn't knowwhat characters were important, so I
          didn't write down the rightinformation. One of the
          things I did write down was that one had a fullpollen
          sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula)
          and the otherhad none visible at all. I thought the
          one without a pollen sac might bein the genus
          Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. Whilethe
          key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the
          genus (?)Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm
          assuming is in theDipteran family Bombylliidae), as
          well as the bee generaBombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa,
          it didn't include thegenus Psithyris. Was there a name
          change, was it an oversight,aren't members of this
          genus within the range of the key! ! ?

          Joe
          Metzger





          John L. Neff
          Central Texas Melittological Institute
          7307 Running Rope
          Austin,TX 78731 USA
          512-345-7219


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        • beeguild@aol.com
          Joe: You likely used the general public bumblebee guide instead of the Bombus guide: _http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Bombus_
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 27, 2007
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            Joe:
             
            You likely used the general public bumblebee guide instead of the Bombus guide:
             
             
            The Bombus guide, as Jack notes, contains all the eastern Bumblebee species, including the parasitic members and is up to date taxonomically.  In keeping with that theme, Claudia Ratti is down here in our lab starting the process of expanding the Bombus guide to include all species north of Mexico....that process should take several weeks and we will let folks know when it is complete. 
             
            sam
             
            In a message dated 11/27/2007 12:40:22 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, jlnatctmi@... writes:

            Joe: Recent studies have shown that recognizing
            Psithyrus at the generic level renders Bombus
            paraphyletic. In modern classifications, Psithyrus
            is now just one of the many subgenera of Bombus.

            Jack Neff

            Members,

            When I was on theDiscover Life website, I
            tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which Ihad
            seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years
            ago. I didn't knowwhat characters were important, so I
            didn't write down the rightinformation. One of the
            things I did write down was that one had a fullpollen
            sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula)
            and the otherhad none visible at all. I thought the
            one without a pollen sac might bein the genus
            Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. Whilethe
            key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the
            genus (?)Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm
            assuming is in theDipteran family Bombylliidae) , as
            well as the bee generaBombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa,
            it didn't include thegenus Psithyris. Was there a name
            change, was it an oversight,aren' t members of this
            genus within the range of the key! ! ?

            Joe
            Metzger

            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
            Be a better pen pal.
             




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          • gibbs@yorku.ca
            There is an online key to the Bombus of the world: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/projects/bombus/lucid/index.html Jason -- PhD Candidate Department of
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 28, 2007
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              There is an online key to the Bombus of the world:

              http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/projects/bombus/lucid/index.html

              Jason
              --
              PhD Candidate
              Department of Biology
              York University
              Toronto, Ontario, Canada


              Quoting beeguild@...:

              >
              > Joe:
              >
              > You likely used the general public bumblebee guide instead of the Bombus
              > guide:
              >
              > _http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Bombus_
              > (http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Bombus)
              >
              > The Bombus guide, as Jack notes, contains all the eastern Bumblebee species,
              > including the parasitic members and is up to date taxonomically. In keeping
              > with that theme, Claudia Ratti is down here in our lab starting the process
              > of expanding the Bombus guide to include all species north of Mexico....that
              > process should take several weeks and we will let folks know when it is
              > complete.
              >
              > sam
              >
              > In a message dated 11/27/2007 12:40:22 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              > jlnatctmi@... writes:
              >
              >
              > Joe: Recent studies have shown that recognizing
              > Psithyrus at the generic level renders Bombus
              > paraphyletic. In modern classifications, Psithyrus
              > is now just one of the many subgenera of Bombus.
              >
              > Jack Neff
              >
              > Members,
              >
              > When I was on theDiscover Life website, I
              > tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which Ihad
              > seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years
              > ago. I didn't knowwhat characters were important, so I
              > didn't write down the rightinformation. One of the
              > things I did write down was that one had a fullpollen
              > sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula)
              > and the otherhad none visible at all. I thought the
              > one without a pollen sac might bein the genus
              > Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. Whilethe
              > key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the
              > genus (?)Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm
              > assuming is in theDipteran family Bombylliidae)assu
              > well as the bee generaBombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa,
              > it didn't include thegenus Psithyris. Was there a name
              > change, was it an oversight,aren'change, was it an
              > genus within the range of the key! ! ?
              >
              > Joe
              > Metzger
              >
              > John L. Neff
              > Central Texas Melittological Institute
              > 7307 Running Rope
              > Austin,TX 78731 USA
              > 512-345-7219
              >
              > __________________________________________________________
              > Be a better pen pal.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > **************************************Check out AOL's list of 2007's hottest
              > products.
              > (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?NCID=aoltop00030000000001)
              >
            • Dave Green
              By October and November here in South Carolina, I only see males on flowers. I ve been asked sometimes if bees sleep. I say yes, based on my observations
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 29, 2007
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                By October and November here in South Carolina, I only see males on flowers.
                 
                I've been asked sometimes if bees sleep. I say yes, based on my observations several times of fraternus males on tickseed late in the year. They settle on the flowers late in the day. If you disturb them, then fly away. But about dusk, they seem to "go to sleep" quite rapidly - it only takes a couple minutes. After that, they will not fly if you disturb them. You can even poke them and they will just barely move, perhaps raising a hind leg at most.
                 
                This year we have a lot of little volunteer sunflowers around our bird feeder. I let them grow and bloom, because there is little forage in the yard at this time of year. Male impatiens have been sleeping in the blossoms in the same way, and in the cool mornings they are slow to waken. But they will suddenly rouse and be off, perhaps an hour after sunrise. We have a few sunflowers still blooming, but these bees finally disappeared about a week ago. We had three or four that came for nearly a month; I'm sure they were the same individuals. We thought of them as pets.
                 
                Interestingly the Christmas camellias are blooming and I've not seen a bee on them this year. They are jammed with yellow jackets, paper wasps and hornets though. These are quite aggressive to each other, so perhaps have discouraged the bees.
                 
                Any comments would be welcome. I've not heard of this from others.
                 
                Dave Green
                 
                 
                 
                -----Original Message-----
                From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of David Inouye
                Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2007 9:30 AM
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bumble Bees

                Joe - males don't have corbiculae, so if you were observing bees after late summer you might have seen males. 

                David Inouye

                At 06:06 AM 11/27/2007, you wrote:

                Members,
                 
                          When I was on the Discover Life website, I tried to key out 2 species of Bumble Bee which I had seen nectaring on catnip in my yard a couple years ago. I didn't know what characters were important, so I didn't write down the right information. One of the things I did write down was that one had a full pollen sac (I think this is technically called a corbicula) and the other had none visible at all. I thought the one without a pollen sac might be in the genus Psithyris which contains Cuckoo Bumble Bees. While the key accounted for a number of unnamed species in the genus (?) Asilidae (an odd name for a genus which I'm assuming is in the Dipteran family Bombylliidae), as well as the bee genera Bombus, Ceratina and Xylocopa, it didn't include the genus Psithyris. Was there a name change, was it an oversight, aren't members of this genus within the range of the key! ! ?
                 
                                                                  Joe Metzger

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