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Re: [beemonitoring] plant – pollinator interaction s highly inconstant

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  • Peter Bernhardt
    I haven t got an entrenched view point. I simply know when someone is pushing their their own view by arming themselves with literature they find useful but
    Message 1 of 23 , Apr 25, 2011
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      I haven't got an entrenched view point.   I simply know when someone is pushing their their own view by arming themselves with literature they find useful but is not really germane to the point.  Are honeybees pollinating ALL the native, North American plants they now visit?  Six weeks running through the literature isn't much of an accomplishment when you try to stay abreast of your field over 35 years.  We know where you're going.

      Peter Bernhardt

      On Mon, Apr 25, 2011 at 9:49 AM, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:
       

      > Some of your comments in your previous message left me and (I suspect) other members of this group with the distinct impression that you were heading towards a specific conclusion.

      Reply:

      I spent 6 weeks reading through the literature and the general picture is that particular plant/pollinator systems vary so much from year to year that it is almost impossible to assess the impact of introduced species upon them. This shift in viewing these pollinator webs as shape-shifting is new. Perhaps you should read something new that doesn't coincide with your entrenched viewpoint:

      The impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation are commonly expressed through changes in species richness and the relative abundance of ecological communities. But biodiversity is also defi ned as variation in the number and type of interactions (e.g., predation, pollination) in which different species are engaged ( Dyer et al., 2010 ). Some species may disproportionately facilitate biodiversity through their interactions with other species. In most ecosystems, species interactions form a vast network whose nodes and links are variable in space and time ( Ings et al., 2009 ). For example, Petanidou et al. (2008) found that plant – pollinator interactions were highly inconstant as a result of high species turnover and changes in the degree of interaction specialization from year to year.

      The disentangled bank: How loss of habitat fragments and disassembles ecological networks
      Andrew Gonzalez, Bronwyn Rayfield and Zoë Lindo
      American Journal of Botany 98: 503-516 (2011)


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