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THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY

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  • Peter Loring Borst
    Hi all, I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 22 7:28 AM
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      Hi all,
      I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

      Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
      networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
      alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
      to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
      function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
      may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
      alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
      species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
      work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
      and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
      may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
      networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
      and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
      on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
      removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
      and effects on native plant and pollinator population
      dynamics since invasion.

      THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
      UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
      TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
      Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
      American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.
    • Laurence Packer
      Greetings Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 22 7:53 AM
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        Greetings

        Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

        I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

        Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

        best wishes

        laurence

        --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:

        From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
        Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

         

        Hi all,
        I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

        Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
        networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
        alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
        to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
        function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
        may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
        alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
        species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
        work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
        and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
        may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
        networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
        and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
        on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
        removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
        and effects on native plant and pollinator population
        dynamics since invasion.

        THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
        UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
        TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
        Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
        American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.

      • Sam Droege
        I had forgotten about Andrena wilkella....and agree that to the south of Canada it also can be dominant in late spring early/mid summer when many other Andrena
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 22 8:56 AM
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          I had forgotten about Andrena wilkella....and agree that to the south of Canada it also can be dominant in late spring early/mid summer when many other Andrena are, interestingly, gone.


          sam
          P Bees are not optional.


          From:Laurence Packer <laurencepacker@...>
          To:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Date:04/22/2011 10:54 AM
          Subject:[beemonitoring] Lasioglossum leucozonium
          Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com





           

          Greetings

          Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

          I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

          Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

          best wishes

          laurence

          --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:


          From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
          Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

           

          Hi all,
          I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

          Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
          networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
          alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
          to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
          function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
          may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
          alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
          species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
          work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
          and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
          may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
          networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
          and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
          on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
          removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
          and effects on native plant and pollinator population
          dynamics since invasion.

          THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
          UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
          TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
          Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
          American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.



        • T'ai Roulston
          Laurence: I shouldn t have any trouble getting you 20 Osmia taurus and Megachile sculpturalis, if you want. Pure ethanol? Preference of gender? T ai ... T ai
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 22 9:14 AM
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            Laurence:

            I shouldn't have any trouble getting you 20 Osmia taurus and Megachile sculpturalis, if you want. Pure ethanol? Preference of gender?

            T'ai
            On Apr 22, 2011, at 10:53 AM, Laurence Packer wrote:

             

            Greetings

            Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

            I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

            Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

            best wishes

            laurence

            --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:

            From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
            Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

             

            Hi all,
            I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

            Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
            networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
            alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
            to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
            function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
            may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
            alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
            species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
            work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
            and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
            may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
            networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
            and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
            on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
            removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
            and effects on native plant and pollinator population
            dynamics since invasion.

            THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
            UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
            TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
            Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
            American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.


            T'ai Roulston
            Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
            Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
            University of Virginia



          • Matthias Buck
            Interestingly, alien ground-nesting aculeate wasps seem to have been less successful in colonizing the North American continent. The only species I can think
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 22 9:15 AM
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              Interestingly, alien ground-nesting aculeate wasps seem to have been less successful in colonizing the North American continent. The only species I can think of right now is Oxybelus bipunctatus (Crabronidae). Kurczewski published a paper on its spread in the northeastern Nearctic years ago. If anyone knows of any other ground-nesting introduced aculeate wasps I would love to hear about it.

              Is there a list of the ground-nesting alien bees for North America?

              Cheers,

                                Matthias

              On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 8:53 AM, Laurence Packer <laurencepacker@...> wrote:
               

              Greetings

              Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

              I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

              Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

              best wishes

              laurence

              --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:

              From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
              Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

               

              Hi all,
              I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

              Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
              networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
              alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
              to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
              function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
              may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
              alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
              species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
              work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
              and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
              may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
              networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
              and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
              on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
              removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
              and effects on native plant and pollinator population
              dynamics since invasion.

              THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
              UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
              TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
              Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
              American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.




              --
              Dr. Matthias Buck
              Invertebrate Zoology
              Royal Alberta Museum
              12845-102nd Avenue
              Edmonton, Alberta
              Canada, T5N 0M6
              Phone: (780) 453-9122
              www.royalalbertamuseum.ca
            • Charley Eiseman
              Check this list on BugGuide.Net: http://bugguide.net/node/view/248891#Anchor_Hymeno It only includes species for which BugGuide has images, so it is missing
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 22 9:28 AM
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                Check this list on BugGuide.Net: http://bugguide.net/node/view/248891#Anchor_Hymeno
                It only includes species for which BugGuide has images, so it is missing O. bipunctatus, and presumably others.  I'm not sure if you would count Larra as a ground nester... it lays eggs on paralyzed mole crickets in their own burrows.

                Charley

                On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 12:15 PM, Matthias Buck <buckmb@...> wrote:
                 

                Interestingly, alien ground-nesting aculeate wasps seem to have been less successful in colonizing the North American continent. The only species I can think of right now is Oxybelus bipunctatus (Crabronidae). Kurczewski published a paper on its spread in the northeastern Nearctic years ago. If anyone knows of any other ground-nesting introduced aculeate wasps I would love to hear about it.

                Is there a list of the ground-nesting alien bees for North America?

                Cheers,

                                  Matthias



                On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 8:53 AM, Laurence Packer <laurencepacker@...> wrote:
                 

                Greetings

                Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

                I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

                Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

                best wishes

                laurence

                --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:

                From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
                Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

                 

                Hi all,
                I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

                Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
                networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
                alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
                to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
                function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
                may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
                alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
                species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
                work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
                and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
                may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
                networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
                and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
                on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
                removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
                and effects on native plant and pollinator population
                dynamics since invasion.

                THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
                UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
                TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
                Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
                American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.




                --
                Dr. Matthias Buck
                Invertebrate Zoology
                Royal Alberta Museum
                12845-102nd Avenue
                Edmonton, Alberta
                Canada, T5N 0M6
                Phone: (780) 453-9122
                www.royalalbertamuseum.ca



                --
                www.charleyeiseman.com
                bugtracks.wordpress.com
                www.northernnaturalists.com

              • Matthias Buck
                Thanks for the list! I was actually referring to the accidentally introduced species. Larra bicolor was deliberately introduced for the control of mole
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 22 9:51 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks for the list! I was actually referring to the accidentally introduced species. Larra bicolor was deliberately introduced for the control of mole crickets. Pison is a cavity nester. I forgot to mention that there are quite a few introduced cavity-nesting aculeate wasps (probably just as many as bees).

                  On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 10:28 AM, Charley Eiseman <ceiseman@...> wrote:
                  Check this list on BugGuide.Net: http://bugguide.net/node/view/248891#Anchor_Hymeno
                  It only includes species for which BugGuide has images, so it is missing O. bipunctatus, and presumably others.  I'm not sure if you would count Larra as a ground nester... it lays eggs on paralyzed mole crickets in their own burrows.

                  Charley

                  On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 12:15 PM, Matthias Buck <buckmb@...> wrote:
                   

                  Interestingly, alien ground-nesting aculeate wasps seem to have been less successful in colonizing the North American continent. The only species I can think of right now is Oxybelus bipunctatus (Crabronidae). Kurczewski published a paper on its spread in the northeastern Nearctic years ago. If anyone knows of any other ground-nesting introduced aculeate wasps I would love to hear about it.

                  Is there a list of the ground-nesting alien bees for North America?

                  Cheers,

                                    Matthias



                  On Fri, Apr 22, 2011 at 8:53 AM, Laurence Packer <laurencepacker@...> wrote:
                   

                  Greetings

                  Sam is right about Lasioglossum leucozonium as being abundant and probably having arrived as a single female (the genetic data supporting that view is outlined in the attached paper).

                  I would very much like to test the possibility of similarly small original invasion forces with additional introduced species. If anyone has access to ( or can get) 20 or more individuals of any non-native species from anywhere in North America I would be very grateful.  I hope to start performing genetic studies along the lines of those in the attached paper starting in 2012.

                  Another ground-nester that has become increasingly abundant here is Andrena wilkella.

                  best wishes

                  laurence

                  --- On Fri, 4/22/11, Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...> wrote:

                  From: Peter Loring Borst <peterlborst1@...>
                  Subject: [beemonitoring] THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY
                  To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  Received: Friday, April 22, 2011, 10:28 AM

                   

                  Hi all,
                  I certainly do not wish to engage in a battle of wit over which papers more accurately represent reality regarding this contentious topic. However, I personally believe that many studies demonstrate a distinct bias which renders them useless. So, I would suggest that objectivity and lack of agenda are paramount in teasing out the truth in these conjectures. Also, I would tend to gravitate toward more recent work, such as:

                  Overall, these studies suggest that plant – pollinator interaction
                  networks are quite plastic and permeable to invasion by
                  alien species, but the structure of networks is relatively robust
                  to invasion. However, there is some evidence to suggest the
                  function of invaded networks in terms of pollination services
                  may be compromised. Even less is known about the effects of
                  alien pollinators on network structure and function or of alien
                  species on plant and pollinator reproduction. Additional empirical
                  work, ideally with interaction data pre-invasion, during invasion,
                  and post-removal, is sorely needed. In particular, we
                  may be facing unexpected consequences for plant – pollinator
                  networks from management and removal of invaders. The magnitude
                  and direction of the effects of invader removal may depend
                  on the density and spatiotemporal extent of invasion and
                  removal, the degree of invader integration into community interactions,
                  and effects on native plant and pollinator population
                  dynamics since invasion.

                  THE FUTURE OF PLANT – POLLINATOR DIVERSITY:
                  UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION NETWORKS ACROSS
                  TIME, SPACE, AND GLOBAL CHANGE
                  Laura A. Burkle and Ruben Alarcon
                  American Journal of Botany 98(3): 528–538. 2011.




                  --
                  Dr. Matthias Buck
                  Invertebrate Zoology
                  Royal Alberta Museum
                  12845-102nd Avenue
                  Edmonton, Alberta
                  Canada, T5N 0M6
                  Phone: (780) 453-9122
                  www.royalalbertamuseum.ca



                  --
                  www.charleyeiseman.com
                  bugtracks.wordpress.com
                  www.northernnaturalists.com




                  --
                  Dr. Matthias Buck
                  Invertebrate Zoology
                  Royal Alberta Museum
                  12845-102nd Avenue
                  Edmonton, Alberta
                  Canada, T5N 0M6
                  Phone: (780) 453-9122
                  www.royalalbertamuseum.ca
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