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Re: [beemonitoring] Propylene glycol and cats

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  • Jil_Swearingen@nps.gov
    Leo and others, Bobcats and other wild felines could be affected. Does anyone have any information on that? Thanks, Jil ________________ JiL SWEARINGEN IPM &
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 6, 2011
    Leo and others,

    Bobcats and other wild felines could be affected. Does anyone have any
    information on that?

    Thanks,

    Jil

    ________________
    JiL SWEARINGEN
    IPM & Invasive Species Specialist
    NCR Center for Urban Ecology
    Washington, DC 20007
    202-342-1443, ex 218
    www.nps.gov/cue | www.nps.gov/plants/alien
    www.invasiveplantatlas.org | www.maipc.org



    Leo Shapiro
    <leoshapiro99@gma
    il.com> To
    Sent by: "Stoner, Kimberly"
    beemonitoring@yah <Kimberly.Stoner@...>
    oogroups.com cc
    "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com"
    <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>,
    04/06/2011 04:13 "pollinator@..."
    PM <pollinator@...>
    Subject
    Re: [beemonitoring] Propylene
    glycol and cats













    Yes, this is good for people to be aware of. But I'm guessing cats are
    less inclined to drink the stuff than are many other animals (I'm sure
    someone will correct me if I'm mistaken!).



    Of course, cats should not be wandering around outdoors anyhow:

    http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html

    Leo Shapiro



    On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:51 PM, Stoner, Kimberly wrote:




    In relation to propylene glycol and cats:





    Apparently cats do have unique sensitivity to propylene glycol, which
    is not true of humans, dogs, or cattle.





    See this publication by the American Chemistry Council, not a group
    of “chemophobes” by any stretch of the imagination:


    http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_0046/0901b80380046c77.pdf?filepath=propyleneglycol/pdfs/noreg/117-01660.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc





    and this article on “Heinz body formation in cats” from a veterinary
    school:


    http://www.vet.uga.edu/vpp/clerk/tarigo/index.php





    “Propylene glycol (PG) is a common cause of HzB in cats. PG is a
    polyhydric alcohol used commonly as a solvent and preservative in
    pharmaceuticals, and as an inexpensive carbohydrate source in
    semi-moist foods for animals.3”


    3. Christopher MM, White JG, Eaton JW. Erythrocyte pathology and
    mechanisms of Heinz body-mediated hemolysis in cats. Vet Pathol.
    27:299-310. 1990.


    It would be wise to put the propylene glycol traps in locations where
    cats would not have access to them (inside fences, perhaps?) I’ll
    think about that for the traps I intend to be putting out next week!





    Kim Stoner
  • H
    All- Quinine (quinine sulfate / quinine bisulfate) will discourage most all would be drinkers. I can t give you any exact doses but it will it does work.
    Message 2 of 7 , Apr 6, 2011
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      All-

      Quinine (quinine sulfate / quinine bisulfate) will discourage most all would be drinkers. I can't give you any exact doses but it will it does work. Should act like a salt in solution but the quantity I used (ten years ago - can't remember) did not affect the mounted quality of the bees to any noticeable degree.

      Buying the "anti-parasitic" medication for pond fish is the cheapest way of getting it.

      There is also the advantage of  Quinine being very sensitive to ultraviolet light (UV) as it will fluoresce in direct sunlight....


      Best,
      H




      HW Ikerd
      Hikerd@...
      435-227-5711 (Google Voice)
      435-797-2425(work)



      On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 1:51 PM, Stoner, Kimberly <Kimberly.Stoner@...> wrote:
       

      In relation to propylene glycol and cats:

       

      Apparently cats do have unique sensitivity to propylene glycol, which is not true of humans, dogs, or cattle.

       

      See this publication by the American Chemistry Council, not a group of “chemophobes” by any stretch of the imagination:

      http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_0046/0901b80380046c77.pdf?filepath=propyleneglycol/pdfs/noreg/117-01660.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc

       

      and this article on “Heinz body formation in cats” from a veterinary school:

      http://www.vet.uga.edu/vpp/clerk/tarigo/index.php

       

      Propylene glycol (PG) is a common cause of HzB in cats. PG is a polyhydric alcohol used commonly as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceuticals, and as an inexpensive carbohydrate source in semi-moist foods for animals.3”

      3. Christopher MM, White JG, Eaton JW. Erythrocyte pathology and mechanisms of Heinz body-mediated hemolysis in cats. Vet Pathol. 27:299-310. 1990.

      It would be wise to put the propylene glycol traps in locations where cats would not have access to them (inside fences, perhaps?)  I’ll think about that for the traps I intend to be putting out next week!

       

      Kim Stoner


    • Leo Shapiro
      I don t know that anyone has collected data on the effect of propylene glycol on wild felines, but it would certainly not be surprising if they showed
      Message 3 of 7 , Apr 6, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I don't know that anyone has collected data on the effect of propylene glycol on wild felines, but it would certainly not be surprising if they showed sensitivity similar to that seen in domestic cats, so that may be a reasonable concern in some areas.

        Sam or others who've been trapping with propylene glycol for a while: do you see much evidence of ANY mammals drinking it?  One advantage over ethylene glycol is supposed to be the lack of a sweet taste possibly making it less appealing (of course, domestic cats supposedly can't taste "sweet" anyhow). I think the main reason there has been research on the impact of propylene glycol on cats is with respect to its use as a food additive.



        On Apr 6, 2011, at 4:29 PM, Jil_Swearingen@... wrote:

        [Attachment(s) from Jil_Swearingen@... included below]

        Leo and others, 

        Bobcats and other wild felines could be affected. Does anyone have any 
        information on that? 

        Thanks, 

        Jil 

        ________________ 
        JiL SWEARINGEN 
        IPM & Invasive Species Specialist 
        NCR Center for Urban Ecology 
        Washington, DC 20007 
        202-342-1443, ex 218 
        www.nps.gov/cue | www.nps.gov/plants/alien 
        www.invasiveplantatlas.org | www.maipc.org 



        Leo Shapiro 
        <leoshapiro99@gma 
        il.com> To 
        Sent by: "Stoner, Kimberly" 
        beemonitoring@yah <Kimberly.Stoner@...> 
        oogroups.com cc 
        "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" 
        <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>, 
        04/06/2011 04:13 "pollinator@..." 
        PM <pollinator@...> 
        Subject 
        Re: [beemonitoring] Propylene 
        glycol and cats 













        Yes, this is good for people to be aware of. But I'm guessing cats are 
        less inclined to drink the stuff than are many other animals (I'm sure 
        someone will correct me if I'm mistaken!). 



        Of course, cats should not be wandering around outdoors anyhow: 

        http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html 

        Leo Shapiro 



        On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:51 PM, Stoner, Kimberly wrote: 




        In relation to propylene glycol and cats: 





        Apparently cats do have unique sensitivity to propylene glycol, which 
        is not true of humans, dogs, or cattle. 





        See this publication by the American Chemistry Council, not a group 
        of “chemophobes” by any stretch of the imagination: 


        http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_0046/0901b80380046c77.pdf?filepath=propyleneglycol/pdfs/noreg/117-01660.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc





        and this article on “Heinz body formation in cats” from a veterinary 
        school: 


        http://www.vet.uga.edu/vpp/clerk/tarigo/index.php 





        “Propylene glycol (PG) is a common cause of HzB in cats. PG is a 
        polyhydric alcohol used commonly as a solvent and preservative in 
        pharmaceuticals, and as an inexpensive carbohydrate source in 
        semi-moist foods for animals.3” 


        3. Christopher MM, White JG, Eaton JW. Erythrocyte pathology and 
        mechanisms of Heinz body-mediated hemolysis in cats. Vet Pathol. 
        27:299-310. 1990. 


        It would be wise to put the propylene glycol traps in locations where 
        cats would not have access to them (inside fences, perhaps?) I’ll 
        think about that for the traps I intend to be putting out next week! 





        Kim Stoner 







      • Anita M. Collins
        Quinine as an addition is a good possibility. Honey bees don t taste it. They used quinine to spike sugar sold to beekeepers during WWII so that it could not
        Message 4 of 7 , Apr 6, 2011
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          Quinine as an addition is a good possibility.  Honey bees don't taste it.  They used quinine to spike sugar sold to beekeepers during WWII so that it could not be resold on the black market, just used to feed colonies.
           
          Anita
          If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be research.
          Albert Einstein

          Apr 6, 2011 04:45:18 PM, HIkerd@... wrote:
           

          All-

          Quinine (quinine sulfate / quinine bisulfate) will discourage most all would be drinkers. I can't give you any exact doses but it will it does work. Should act like a salt in solution but the quantity I used (ten years ago - can't remember) did not affect the mounted quality of the bees to any noticeable degree.

          Buying the "anti-parasitic" medication for pond fish is the cheapest way of getting it.

          There is also the advantage of  Quinine being very sensitive to ultraviolet light (UV) as it will fluoresce in direct sunlight....


          Best,
          H




          HW Ikerd
          Hikerd@...
          435-227-5711 (Google Voice)
          435-797-2425(work)



          On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 1:51 PM, Stoner, Kimberly <Kimberly.Stoner@...> wrote:
           

          In relation to propylene glycol and cats:

           

          Apparently cats do have unique sensitivity to propylene glycol, which is not true of humans, dogs, or cattle.

           

          See this publication by the American Chemistry Council, not a group of “chemophobes” by any stretch of the imagination:

          http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_0046/0901b80380046c77.pdf?filepath=propyleneglycol/pdfs/noreg/117-01660.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc

           

          and this article on “Heinz body formation in cats” from a veterinary school:

          http://www.vet.uga.edu/vpp/clerk/tarigo/index.php

           

          Propylene glycol (PG) is a common cause of HzB in cats. PG is a polyhydric alcohol used commonly as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceuticals, and as an inexpensive carbohydrate source in semi-moist foods for animals.3”

          3. Christopher MM, White JG, Eaton JW. Erythrocyte pathology and mechanisms of Heinz body-mediated hemolysis in cats. Vet Pathol. 27:299-310. 1990.

          It would be wise to put the propylene glycol traps in locations where cats would not have access to them (inside fences, perhaps?)  I’ll think about that for the traps I intend to be putting out next week!

           

          Kim Stoner


        • Sam Droege
          We had no evidence of any animal drinking the material from around the country. Additionally, I had a whole series of traps in my yard with a dog and cat that
          Message 5 of 7 , Apr 7, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            We had no evidence of any animal drinking the material from around the country.  Additionally, I had a whole series of traps in my yard with a dog and cat that both eat all sorts of disgusting things and they completely ignored the traps which were right at convenient drinking height.

            PG is used commonly by vets for lubricating pills for dogs and reaching inside of large animals....(but apparently not reaching inside of cats).  Vet supply houses are good places to buy gallon stocks of pure PG.

            sam

            Sam Droege  Sam_Droege@...                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
            Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

            Out Here

            Dear D., I'm in a place where history
            can't reach, they say.  I'm out here on the plain
            where corn, chemically assisted, fills
            a hog so full it staggers to its trough.
            where chickens lay in unison and sing
            the song American.  Where "family"

            is a metaphor and "home" a way to sell.
            The cows out on Moore's Pike moo like boosters
            for the new shopping mall extension.
            A woods the size of Florida's in flames,
            and breeding's rocket blows apart.  Who knows,
            the world may come to Bloomington in time.

            Already, condos claw up every hill
            in sight.  The refugees arrive.  The world's
            in flight, D., grabbing what it can
            Before it's gone.
            It's gone, of course.  The grabbing's just a game.
            A hundred million on a side, no time-outs.
                   -Roger Mitchell



            From:Leo Shapiro <leoshapiro99@...>
            To:Jil_Swearingen@...
            Cc:Scott_Bates@..., "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>, "Stoner, Kimberly" <Kimberly.Stoner@...>, "pollinator@..." <pollinator@...>
            Date:04/06/2011 04:58 PM
            Subject:Re: [beemonitoring] Propylene glycol and cats
            Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com





             

            I don't know that anyone has collected data on the effect of propylene glycol on wild felines, but it would certainly not be surprising if they showed sensitivity similar to that seen in domestic cats, so that may be a reasonable concern in some areas.

            Sam or others who've been trapping with propylene glycol for a while: do you see much evidence of ANY mammals drinking it?  One advantage over ethylene glycol is supposed to be the lack of a sweet taste possibly making it less appealing (of course, domestic cats supposedly can't taste "sweet" anyhow). I think the main reason there has been research on the impact of propylene glycol on cats is with respect to its use as a food additive.



            On Apr 6, 2011, at 4:29 PM, Jil_Swearingen@... wrote:

            [Attachment(s) from Jil_Swearingen@... included below]

            Leo and others,

            Bobcats and other wild felines could be affected. Does anyone have any
            information on that?

            Thanks,

            Jil

            ________________
            JiL SWEARINGEN
            IPM & Invasive Species Specialist
            NCR Center for Urban Ecology
            Washington, DC 20007
            202-342-1443, ex 218

            www.nps.gov/cue | www.nps.gov/plants/alien
            www.invasiveplantatlas.org | www.maipc.org



            Leo Shapiro
            <leoshapiro99@gma
            il.com> To
            Sent by: "Stoner, Kimberly"
            beemonitoring@yah <
            Kimberly.Stoner@...>
            oogroups.com cc
            "
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com"
            <
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>,
            04/06/2011 04:13 "
            pollinator@..."
            PM <
            pollinator@...>
            Subject
            Re: [beemonitoring] Propylene
            glycol and cats













            Yes, this is good for people to be aware of. But I'm guessing cats are
            less inclined to drink the stuff than are many other animals (I'm sure
            someone will correct me if I'm mistaken!).



            Of course, cats should not be wandering around outdoors anyhow:

            http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html

            Leo Shapiro



            On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:51 PM, Stoner, Kimberly wrote:




            In relation to propylene glycol and cats:





            Apparently cats do have unique sensitivity to propylene glycol, which
            is not true of humans, dogs, or cattle.





            See this publication by the American Chemistry Council, not a group
            of “chemophobes” by any stretch of the imagination:


            http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLiteratureDOWCOM/dh_0046/0901b80380046c77.pdf?filepath=propyleneglycol/pdfs/noreg/117-01660.pdf&fromPage=GetDoc





            and this article on “Heinz body formation in cats” from a veterinary
            school:


            http://www.vet.uga.edu/vpp/clerk/tarigo/index.php





            “Propylene glycol (PG) is a common cause of HzB in cats. PG is a
            polyhydric alcohol used commonly as a solvent and preservative in
            pharmaceuticals, and as an inexpensive carbohydrate source in
            semi-moist foods for animals.3”


            3. Christopher MM, White JG, Eaton JW. Erythrocyte pathology and
            mechanisms of Heinz body-mediated hemolysis in cats. Vet Pathol.
            27:299-310. 1990.


            It would be wise to put the propylene glycol traps in locations where
            cats would not have access to them (inside fences, perhaps?) I’ll
            think about that for the traps I intend to be putting out next week!





            Kim Stoner







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