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Native bee article

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  • Sandra_Lary@fws.gov
    Interesting native bee article: http://www.gardendesign.com/yellow/bee-season?cmpid=enews030811 Sandra ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sandra J. Lary, Senior
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 9, 2011

      Interesting native bee article:  

      http://www.gardendesign.com/yellow/bee-season?cmpid=enews030811


      Sandra

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist
      U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

      Ecological Services-Coastal Program
      4R Fundy Rd, Falmouth ME 04105

      207-781-8364, ext. 19

    • Charley Eiseman
      Hi Eric (and other bee nest aficionados), I m curious to hear how you would rule out the possibility that the closed cells in the top row were made by spider
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 10, 2011
        Hi Eric (and other bee nest aficionados),

        I'm curious to hear how you would rule out the possibility that the closed cells in the top row were made by spider wasps (Auplopus or Phanagenia)--if, for instance, they had not been found in association with these obviously pollen-filled cells.  The examples of pompilid nests I have seen tend to have smoother walls and not be so neatly arranged, but I don't know if this is always the case.  Is this very lumpy appearance, with each individual mud pellet visible, typical of Osmia nests?

        Thanks,

        Charley Eiseman

        www.NorthernNaturalists.com

        2011/3/9 Eric Mader <eric@...>
         

        Hi Jil,

        I think the color variation in the mud is just a matter of the
        different patches of soil where the mother bee(s) collected mud
        (variations in clay content, minerals, etc.). The yellow is obviously
        pollen.

        I am guessing that all of the cells were provisioned and capped, but
        the open/empty ones on the bottom are the result of the photographer
        lifting away the covering surface (maybe a stone or a brick, or
        something), and probably dislodging the provisions (making them appear
        empty).

        T'ai can probably clarify the circumstances under which he found this.

        Cheers!

        -Eric

        On Wed, Mar 9, 2011 at 10:33 AM, <Jil_Swearingen@...> wrote:
        > Eric,
        > Can you explain what I'm seeing here - the various colors of the cells and
        > the full vs empty and the red-brick cells at the top? It's really
        > fascinating and I'd like to understand what's going on here. You can reply
        > to the whole group if you like...
        > Thanks,
        > Jil
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Eric Mader
        > <eric@...>
        > Sent by: To
        > beemonitoring@yah "T'ai Roulston"
        > oogroups.com <thr8z@...>
        > cc
        > beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        > 03/04/2011 04:26 Subject
        > PM Re: [beemonitoring] id bee nest
        > from photo
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        > Hi T'ai,
        >
        > This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons)
        > commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very
        > very familiar!
        >
        > Cheers!
        >
        > -Eric
        >
        > On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 1:09 PM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
        > Bee Nest Afficionados:
        >
        >
        >
        > I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I
        > gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the
        > nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is
        > pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure
        > like this. The top is all mud.
        >
        > Does this look familiar to anyone?
        >
        > T'ai
        >
        >
        > (Embedded image moved to file: pic16731.jpg)

        >
        > T'ai Roulston
        > Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
        > Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
        > University of Virginia
        > tai.roulston@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        > Eric Mader
        > Assistant Pollinator Program Director The Xerces Society for
        > Invertebrate Conservation
        > Assistant Professor of Extension University of Minnesota, Department of
        > Entomology
        >
        > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
        > 1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!
        >
        > 4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
        > eric@...
        > Tel: (503) 232-6639
        > Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
        > Cell: (503) 989-3649
        > Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
        > (日本語でどうぞ)
        >
        > Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
        > www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
        >
        > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
        > nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
        > invertebrates and their habitat.
        >
        > To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please
        > visit www.xerces.org.
        >
        > NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
        > Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and
        > Butterflies
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        >
        >
        >

        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------
        Eric Mader
        Assistant Pollinator Program Director
        The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
        Assistant Professor of Extension
        University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology

        The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
        1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

        4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
        eric@...
        Tel: (503) 232-6639
        Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
        Cell: (503) 989-3649
        Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
        (日本語でどうぞ)

        Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
        www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/

        The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
        nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation
        of invertebrates and their habitat.

        To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work,
        please visit www.xerces.org.

        NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
        Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
        ----------------------------------------------------------

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