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BIML Update - Faunas, Agapostemon, Colletes, Nomada, Bombus

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  • Sam Droege
    3/1/2011 Bee Faunas Bee Faunas are now available for sharing in the Faunas ftp site: ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/Faunas/ If you have
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 1 8:58 AM
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      3/1/2011

      Bee Faunas

      Bee Faunas are now available for sharing in the Faunas ftp site:
      ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/Faunas/
      If you have additional faunas please send....(for example, we need the Carlinville Illinois Faunas)

      Bahamas Bimini 1953 Krombein.pdf
      Canada Maritimes 2003 Javorek.pdf
      Canada Ontario Southern Bombus 2010 Colla.pdf
      Cuba 2008 Genaro.pdf
      Cuba Island of Pines 2004 Genaro.pdf
      Czech Republic Birch Stand 2003 Kula.pdf
      Czech Republic Spruce Stand 2003 Kula 1.pdf
      Czech Republic Spruce Stand 2003 Kula 2.pdf
      Hispanola 2007 Genaro.pdf
      Trinidad Near 2004 Starr.doc
      United Kingdom Yorkshire Crow Wood 1995 Archer.pdf
      USA Alaska Interior 1989 Armbruster.pdf
      USA Berkeley 2005 Frankie.pdf
      USA Colorado Boulder County 2009 Kearns.pdf
      USA Colorado Urban 2009 Kearns.pdf
      USA Florida Alachua county 2010 Hall.pdf
      USA Florida Everglades 1999 Pascarella.pdf
      USA Illinois Chicago 2009 Tonietto.pdf
      USA Kansas Lawrence 1983 Laroca.pdf
      USA Louisiana Mississippi 2006 Bartholomew.pdf
      USA Maryland Anne Arundel Microdeserts 2009 Droege.pdf
      USA Maryland Assateague Island National Seashore 2010 Orr.pdf
      USA Maryland Plummers Island 1979 Krombein.pdf
      USA Mississippi Lower 1947.pdf
      USA New York New York  Urban 2008 Matteson.pdf
      USA New York New York Suburban 2008 Fetridge.pdf
      USA Ohio kitty todd preserve 2011 Arduser.pdf
      USA Pennsylvania 2010 Donovall.pdf
      USA Puerto Rico 2008 Genaro.pdf
      USA Virginia Great Galls 2009 Steury.pdf

      Sue Boo from our lab found a cool utility for extracting names of files in a folder:  http://www.infonautics.ch/directorylistprint/

      We are going back now over many guide characters and states and refining them...here are some:

      Nomada Female - White Setae  on Hind Tibia

      N. cressonii vs. N. parva vs. N. pygmaea vs. N. illinoensis vs. and N. sayi - NOTE - These are all common species that are almost ALWAYS confused by the beginning practitioner, they have no completely unambiguous characteres that always separate all specimens, and usually require comparative material as well as an expectation that some will not resolve
           
           
      N. cressonii - LARGEST species - Usually separated by its large size, T5 with clear yellow markings, and a pseudopygidium that is comparatively wider than the others - In comparison, N. pygmaea almost never has anything more than yellow smudges on T5 or T4, N. sayi-illinoensis-parva are smaller in size with slender mandibles - Note that N. denticulata is often confused with this species    

      N. parva - Usually the SMALLEST species, but there is overlap with N. sayi and N. illinoensis who average slightly larger - T2 and T3 with small pale yellow circular marks on the FAR lateral sides - Tergites shiny and WITHOUT any pitting - T4 with a complete latitudinal basal dark band, this band not completely black but as dark as the dark marks found on the LATERAL edges of the base of T1 - note that other species have the base of T1 blacker and this mark goes COMPLETELY across the segment, many have PITTING on T2 but many also do not, other small species almost always have relatively larger spots on the lateral sides of T2 and 3 and these often extent to T5, these spots area also more sharply defines and of a brighter color    

      N. pygmaea - An INTERMEDIATE sized species - Abdomen, yellow coloring, usually restricted to lateral patches on T2-T3 - In direct comparison to the smaller species, which it can overlap in size with, the mandibles are thicker and not as long, additionally, when viewed from the side, in profile, the top of the clypeus clearly rises upwards from the base of the supraclypeus to the rim and is readily visible most of the way above the profile of the compound eye, in contrast the smaller species clypeus, in profile, angles upward hardly at all and is visible above the level of the compound eye only towards the end - In contrast to N. cressonii N. pygmaea never appears to have anything more than indistinct yellow smudges on T4-5, but N. cressonii may not have markings on those tergites either, in comparison the pseudopygidial area is narrower and longer than N. cressonii    

      N. sayi and N. illinoensis - It is uclear if N. sayi and N. illinoensis are different species, at this point the BIML group does not differentiate the two - These species are characterized by thin mandibles and small size, but see comments under N. pygmaea and N. parva for further means of differentiating this


       
      Male, A. sericeus vs A. texanus

      A. sericeus - T2-4 has scattered thin, dark hairs that emerge from the dark latitudinal integument bands and lay prone across the narrow transparent rims of these segments, but are not noticeable except under magnfication - In direct comparison, the dark latitudinal bands of the tergites have no or only vague green overtones

      A. texanus - T2-4 has scattered thin and white or pale hairs that emerge from the dark latitudinal integument bands and lay prone across the narrow transparent rims of these segments, but are not noticeable except under magnfication, - In direct comparison, the dark latitudinal bands of the tergites have a STRONG metallic green to blue overtone

       
      The follow Agapostemon Characters are from Michael Orr and Kim Huntzinger.
      .
      Female, scutellum, surface texture, NOT counting the large and areolate patterning along the posterior rim

      Scutellum doubly punctate, having both small and large pits, with the smaller pits of roughly equal density throughout (ang/tex, obliquus, splendens, tyleri)

      Scutellum variably punctate, having pits of many different sizes, with the smallest pits present far more densely in the anterior and often medial portions of the
      scutellum, sometimes forming a T with a bare and shiny spot to each side (coloradinus, femoratus, melliventris, nasutus, obliquus, sericeus, splendens, tyleri, virescens)

      Scutellum with all pits of roughly one size and their pit density uniform, except in some specimens where this is a pair of lateral spots where pitting is either less dense or absent, giving these areas a shinier appearance (leunculus, melliventris, splendens)


      Female, A. nasutus vs all others

      A nasutus - With a pale yellow or creamy spot at the apex of the pronotal lobe - Clypeus strongly concave medially within the apically yellow clypeal rim - Clypeus considerably broader than long, often more than three times as wide as its length

      All others - Pronotal lobe apex similarly colored in comparison to the surrounding integument, without a pale yellow or creamy spot - Clypeus flat in the variably-colored apical rim, or if concave then only very slightly and most often as a result of pitting, rather than a literal dip in the integument - Clypeus with variable breadth, most often only double the clypeal length at most


      Female, A. femoratus vs A. obliquus and A. sericeus, thorax, scutum, surface between parapsidal lines

      A. femoratus - Coarsely rugose to areolate, with the patterning enlarged to the point that the bottoms of all or nearly all of the enclosed, pit-like structures are visible and shiny - Patterning between parapsidal lines largely made up of non-circular formations

      A. obliquus and A. sericeus - Coarsely punctate, with many pits that are not large enough for the bottom of them to be seen, although the surface may be slightly rugose laterally and apically - Patterning between parapsidal lines largely made up of circular formations


      Female, A. angelicus vs A. texanus


      A. angelicus - The females of this species can not be reliably distinguished from the females of A. texanus based on morphology. However, the range of A. angelicus is limited to the area West of the Mississippi river, making it impossible to tell the species in that region.

      A. texanus - The females of this species can not be reliably distinguished from the females of A. angelicus based on morphology. As A. texanus has a distribution including East of the Mississippi river, any specimens that are either A. angelicus or A. texanus in this area may be safely regarded as A. texanus.


      Female, head, supraclypeal area, pitting

      Supraclypeus produced into a strong bump, the pinnacle of which is largely unpitted and unpatterned such that it has a smooth and shiny appearance in comparison to the integument elsewhere on the supraclypeus (ang/tex, coloradinus, tyleri)

      Supraclypeal bump medially roughened by transverse striations or heavy pitting, with no central shiny area as a result (all except tyleri)

      Female, A. coloradinus vs A. tyleri

      A. coloradinus - With a much smaller medially smooth and shiny area in the center of the supraclypeus at the apex of the raised area, the remainder of the area appearing heavily marked by faint transverse striations which often intrude upon the medially unpitted area - Gena with coarser striations that extend along the eye up to the vertex - The appressed, white hair patches  of T1 are usually longitudinally longer than latitudinally wide, never coming close to meeting medially on T1, and sometimes being entirely absent - In direct comparison, larger, and with wings nearly as brownish as those of A. splendens

      A. tyleri - With a much larger medially smooth and shiny area of the supraclypeus, the remainder of the raised area of the supraclypeus appearing smooth or weakly roughened by faint bumpy patterning which does not intrude upon the medially unpitted area - Gena with finer striations that extend upward along the eye only slightly past halfway, if at all - The appressed, white hair patches  of T1 are latitudinally wider than longitudinally long, nearly meeting in the center of T1 - In direct comparison, smaller, and with much lighter wings

      Female, A. coloradinus vs A. virescens - CAREFUL, difficult to separate pair

      A. coloradinus - Fine striations on gena, about 5-6 per 0.25mm, best viewed from below - Striations of the gena, specifically those along the outside of the eye, continuing to the top of the eye or very nearly so, WITHOUT a network of very strongly-defined, reticulations which form circular or oblong enclosures, BUT sometimes with irregularly roughened patterning near the top of the eye - The pitting at the middle of T2 near the base of the apically impressed rim is about equal in both pit size and pit density to the areas directly anterior and posterior, giving T2 an equally dulled appearance throughout - In direct comparison, usually LARGER, with only the smallest individuals equal in size to the average A. virescens

      A. virescens - Coarse striations on gena, about 2-3 per 0.25 mm, best viewed from below - Striations of the gena, specifically those along the outside of the eye, most often only continuing along only 80-percent of the eye height at most, where the striations will usually either terminate abruptly or separate from the outside edge of the eye, in both cases giving way to a strongly-defined network of reticulations which form circular or oblong enclosures - The pitting at the middle of T2 near the base of the apically impressed rim is of greater size than the pits directly anterior and posterior, this also decreasing the pit density such that sometimes interpit spacing nears one pit diameter and the area becomes noticeably more shiny than elsewhere on T2, BUT be careful as sometimes this species appears to have very similar pitting to A. coloradinus - In direct comparison, usually SMALLER, with only the largest individuals near equal in size to the average A. coloradinus

      Female, A. obliquus vs. A. sericeus - Difficult to separate pair


      A. obliquus - SOME specimens with yellow basally and+or apically on the scape, when present the yellow is usually at least equal in length to the pedicel or nearly so - In direct comparison, pit density just before the apically impressed rim on T1 MOST OFTEN found to be higher than in A. sericeus such that interpit spacing does not exceed one pit diameter except at the farthest lateral sides - The distribution of A. obliquus is more southwestern than primarily eastern A. sericeus, however both species have been collected in TX and WY

      A. sericeus - NO specimens with yellow on the scape, at most with the integument slightly paled such that it appears a lighter brown than the rest of the scape - In direct comparison, pit density just before the apically impressed rim on T1 MOST OFTEN found to be lower than in A. obliquus such that interpit spacing here will often exceed two pit diameters, CAREFUL as some specimens of A. sericeus have very low interpit spacing similar to A. obliquus - The distribution of A. sericeus is more eastern than primarily southwestern A. obliquus, however both species have been collected in TX and WY


      New State Records - From the Museum of Comparative Zoology

      Nomada vegana - Georgia
      Nomada gracilis  - Alaska
      Nomada lehighensis  - West Virginia
      Nomada lehighensis  - Newfoundland


      Bombus Guide Additions from Michael Orr
       
      PSITHYRUS Subgenus ONLY - Females, B. fernaldae vs other parasitic species

      B. fernaldae -  On the apex of S6, there is a long, ventrally-directed, bare of hairs, acutely shaped, curved projection or plate, that looks similar to the spike-like nail of a dog, having a length at least twice its minimum width when viewed head-on from the rear, often appearing as a heavily curved claw - When viewed in profile, the upper surface of T6 displays a clear oblique bend in the profile, that bend occurring about one third of the way from the tip

      Other Psithyrus species - On S6, the projection is either unnoticeable or with its length only equal to its minimum width, often appearing as a small knob when not obscured by hair - When viewed in profile, the upper surface of T6 forms a smooth concave or convex curve or straight line


      Colletes updates from Michael Orr
       
      C. distinctus vs C. inaequalis vs C. thoracicus

      C. distinctus - Cheek distinctly less broad than the width of the eye in profile - Scutum with intermixed black hairs medially among the off-white hairs - Scutellum has black hairs intermixed with the off-white hairs - Pits on T1 only very slightly larger than the pits of T2, if at all - The band of hair that lines the rim of the tergites clearly and densely present such that the integument beneath is most often completely obscured, on T1 the hair band ranges from complete to widely medially interrupted, always complete on T2-4 and with T5 highly variable

      C. inaequalis - Cheek about as broad as the width of the eye in profile, often broader - Scutum with intermixed black hairs medially among the off-white hairs - Scutellum has black hairs intermixed with the off-white hairs - Pits on T1 very clearly larger than the pits of T2 - The band of hair that lines the rim of the tergites clearly and densely present such that the integument beneath is most often completely obscured, these hair bands usually narrowly medially interrupted or weakened on T1 and complete on T2-4, with T5 being highly variable in its completion

      C. thoracicus - Cheek appearing to be slightly less broad than the width of the eye in profile, although sometimes appearing equally broad - Scutum with EXTREMELY FEW, if any, black hairs intermixed among the brownish-orangish hairs, which themselves obviously contrast in color when compared to the off-white hairs of the mesepisternum - Scutellum with EXTREMELY FEW, if any, black hairs intermixed among the brownish-orangish hairs - Pits on T1 clearly larger than the pits of T2, although the difference is not as large here as it is in C. inaequalis - The band of hair that lines the rim of the tergites considerably weaker than in either C. distinctus or C. inaequalis, often appearing completely absent or very nearly so

      Nomada Female Guide

      Red-haired Species - Species with upright bristles of red hair that stand above the normal white hairs, these hairs particularly prominent on the scape and labrum. All have very long and thin mandibles that stretch at least to and often surpass the edge of the hypostomal cavity. All spring species have no yellow marks on T1. Expect some specimens to lie inbetween the descriptions presented below

      N. composita - Abdomen, T2 and T3, with small to very SMALL yellow patches - Head, cheek, carinate - Pseudopygidial area unique in that among the usually silvery hairs are longer white hairs that project slightly beyond the pseudopygidial area, these similar in thickness to those on the rest of the abdomen - Hind leg, tibia, usually with 2 setae

      N. depressa - Season, mid to late spring - Abdomen, T2-T5, usually with strong yellow patches on the sides, but can be dots in some individuals or complete interrupted stripes - Head, cheek, USUALLY, but not always, strongly carinate - Antenna, color, red-brown - Hind leg, tibia, with 3-6 setae - In comparison, red hairs not as noticeable as in the other springs species, but a pseudopygidial patch that is half or more the longitudinal length of T5 is distinctive

      N. inepta - Season, mid to late spring species - Abdomen, T2, with large yellow patches - T3, usually with NO yellow patches - T4, with LINEAR yellow patches -T5, with very LARGE yellow patches - Head, cheek, NOT carinate or with only a hint of an out-turn - Hind leg, tibia, with 2-5 setae

      N. valida - Abdomen, with NO yellow markings - The tips of the psuedopygidial hairs are distinctly squared off at least along the rim - Setae on hind tibia 3-7 - Cheek rim not carinate - A rare northern species

      N. vicina - Season, late summer to fall species - Abdomen, T1-T5, yellow markings on forming STIPES or broken stripes - Head, cheek, CARINATE - Antenna, color, dark BROWN-BLACK - Hind leg, tibia, with 3-4 setae - In comparison, red hairs not as noticeable as in the other species, so at times they may be missed

      The Slideshow for Displaying Hand Sanitizer turned out to be very popular with 3800 views at this point in time.
      http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/how-preserve-insect-specimens-in-hand-sanitizer

      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
         


      Split the Lark

      Split the Lark--and you'll find the Music--
      Bulb after Bulb, in Silver rolled--
      Scantily dealt to the Summer Morning
      Saved for your Ear when Lutes be old.


      Loose the Flood--you shall find it patent--
      Gush after Gush, reserved for you--
      Scarlet Experiment! Sceptic Thomas!
      Now, do you doubt that your Bird was true?


               - Emily Dickinson


      P Bees are not optional.
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