Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [beemonitoring] Squeeze boxes for insects

Expand Messages
  • david almquist
    There are instructions here http://bugguide.net/node/view/244423 for something like you describe, although the intent was for aquatic insects. I also remember
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 2, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      There are instructions here
      http://bugguide.net/node/view/244423
      for something like you describe, although the intent was for aquatic insects. I also remember someone showing me some optically clear, square-sided vials awhile back that had some special use that I can't remember which might be perfect for what you're describing. They were trying to figure out how to store specimens in them so that the specimens could be photographed through the sides of the vial because they supposedly had no distortion. Sorry I can't be of more help, but if I figure out what those vials were used for, I'll let you know, or maybe this will jog someone's memory.


      ________________________________
      > To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      > From: panulirus@...
      > Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2011 15:45:30 -0600
      > Subject: [beemonitoring] Squeeze boxes for insects
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello all,
      >
      > If you are a member of the inverts in captivity group, please excuse
      > the cross-posting... For everyone else, I am (hopefully) starting a
      > native bee conservation project that will involve photographing each
      > species I find. I would like to restrain the bees in a small acrylic
      > box so that I can take detailed dorsal and ventral pictures for ID
      > without harming them. Does such a squeeze box-type device already exist
      > for insects? If not, does anyone have any design suggestions? I would
      > appreciate any ideas!
      >
      > Thank you,
      >
      > Karen Sprague
      > Herpetology Dept.
      > Houston Zoo, Inc.
      > Houston, TX
      > 713-533-6655
      > ksprague@...
      >
      >
    • pmiller451@aol.com
      Try this website: _http://www.dragonflies.org/specimen.htm_ (http://www.dragonflies.org/specimen.htm) .....tells how to immobilize and then scan flat images of
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 2, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Try this website:
         
         
        .....tells how to immobilize and then scan flat images of live dragonflies....
         
        Penny Miller
        Oglebay Zoo
        Whg, WV
         
         
         
        In a message dated 2/2/2011 4:45:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, panulirus@... writes:
         

        Hello all,


        If you are a member of the inverts in captivity group, please excuse the cross-posting... For everyone else, I am (hopefully) starting a native bee conservation project that will involve photographing each species I find. I would like to restrain the bees in a small acrylic box so that I can take detailed dorsal and ventral pictures for ID without harming them. Does such a squeeze box-type device already exist for insects? If not, does anyone have any design suggestions? I would appreciate any ideas!

        Thank you,

        Karen Sprague
        Herpetology Dept.
        Houston Zoo, Inc.
        Houston, TX
        713-533-6655

        ksprague@...

      • David Inouye
        James Thomson designed a bee squeezer that he use to restrain bees to mark them with paint or tags. It consisted of two vials, one that just fit inside the
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 2, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          James Thomson designed a "bee squeezer" that he use to restrain bees to mark them with paint or tags.  It consisted of two vials, one that just fit inside the other.  The inner one had a sponge glued to the bottom, and it pushed the bee up against the bottom of the outer vial, which had the bottom removed and replaced with a piece of mesh, through which the bee could be marked.  Something similar, but with a clear bottom on the outer vial, might work. 

          David Inouye

          At 04:45 PM 2/2/2011, Karen Sprague wrote:
           

          Hello all,

          If you are a member of the inverts in captivity group, please excuse the cross-posting... For everyone else, I am (hopefully) starting a native bee conservation project that will involve photographing each species I find. I would like to restrain the bees in a small acrylic box so that I can take detailed dorsal and ventral pictures for ID without harming them. Does such a squeeze box-type device already exist for insects? If not, does anyone have any design suggestions? I would appreciate any ideas!

          Thank you,

          Karen Sprague
          Herpetology Dept.
          Houston Zoo, Inc.
          Houston, TX
          713-533-6655
          ksprague@...
        • David_r_smith@fws.gov
          Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box. Unless you are able to immobilize them and
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 3, 2011
          • 0 Attachment

            Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box.  Unless you are able to immobilize them and have one heck of a macro lens, how will key characters needed to ID even to genus be legible, much less suitable to ID to the species level?

            Would such photographic documentation meet the necessary standard to document a species presence?  In one endangered bird survey, southwestern willow flycatcher, the biologist must hear the birds distinct call before it presence can be documented in a area.  Empidonax flycatchers can't reliably be ID'd simply by sight.  Given the color variations we see in Bombus specimens, would this even work for such a large bee?

            Dave Smith
            U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
            323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
            Flagstaff, AZ  86001
            (928) 226-0614 x 109
            "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction"  Dave Rosgen
          • Karen Sprague
            Hello all, Thank you to everyone who has replied, your input is much appreciated. Let me give a little background on my proposed project and myself... I am
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 3, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Hello all,

              Thank you to everyone who has replied, your input is much appreciated.  Let me give a little background on my proposed project and myself...  I am an aquatic biologist (though I work with herps at the moment), my specialty is aquatic arthropod and cephalopod husbandry.  My hobby is insect-watching and as of late I have become very interested in pollinators, namely solitary bees.  According to the experts I've spoken with here in Texas, there has not been much research done in the Houston area regarding what species are present.

              If my project is accepted, I will survey four gardens on Zoo grounds for bees.   I'm hoping that thoroughly documenting the species I find with pictures may help entomologists identify the bees at least to genus.  Although many of you may frown on this, I am not interested in collecting any specimens for ID.  What I am interested in is getting our Zoo guests excited about gardening for wildlife, which would create more bee habitat in this incredibly over-developed city, lessen pesticide use and maybe drum up a little respect for insects.  Our Zoo does not have an insect house, so this is the best project I could come up with for a small amount of grant money.  

              The photos taken will be available for all to see (at some point) so interested parties can see what bees they might encounter in their yards.  I realize that ID to family or genus level only may not be of use to the scientific community, but maybe someone out there will be inclined to do a "real" survey after seeing what we have here.  So once again, I thank you all for the expertise and welcome any suggestions - it's great to learn so much after being a group member for less than 24 hours!


              Karen Sprague
              Houston Zoo



              On Feb 3, 2011, at 9:29 AM, David_R_Smith@... wrote:


              Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box.  Unless you are able to immobilize them and have one heck of a macro lens, how will key characters needed to ID even to genus be legible, much less suitable to ID to the species level?

              Would such photographic documentation meet the necessary standard to document a species presence?  In one endangered bird survey, southwestern willow flycatcher, the biologist must hear the birds distinct call before it presence can be documented in a area.  Empidonax flycatchers can't reliably be ID'd simply by sight.  Given the color variations we see in Bombus specimens, would this even work for such a large bee?

              Dave Smith
              U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
              323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
              Flagstaff, AZ  86001
              (928) 226-0614 x 109
              "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction"  Dave Rosgen

            • karen@sevilleta.unm.edu
              If you put them in the freezer for a few minutes, you can slow them down without killing them. You can then put them on a flower and they will take a while to
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 3, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                If you put them in the freezer for a few minutes, you can slow them down
                without killing them. You can then put them on a flower and they will
                take a while to get moving again. Cheers, Karen

                > Hello all,
                >
                > Thank you to everyone who has replied, your input is much appreciated.
                > Let me give a little background on my proposed project and myself... I am
                > an aquatic biologist (though I work with herps at the moment), my
                > specialty is aquatic arthropod and cephalopod husbandry. My hobby is
                > insect-watching and as of late I have become very interested in
                > pollinators, namely solitary bees. According to the experts I've spoken
                > with here in Texas, there has not been much research done in the Houston
                > area regarding what species are present.
                >
                > If my project is accepted, I will survey four gardens on Zoo grounds for
                > bees. I'm hoping that thoroughly documenting the species I find with
                > pictures may help entomologists identify the bees at least to genus.
                > Although many of you may frown on this, I am not interested in collecting
                > any specimens for ID. What I am interested in is getting our Zoo guests
                > excited about gardening for wildlife, which would create more bee habitat
                > in this incredibly over-developed city, lessen pesticide use and maybe
                > drum up a little respect for insects. Our Zoo does not have an insect
                > house, so this is the best project I could come up with for a small amount
                > of grant money.
                >
                > The photos taken will be available for all to see (at some point) so
                > interested parties can see what bees they might encounter in their yards.
                > I realize that ID to family or genus level only may not be of use to the
                > scientific community, but maybe someone out there will be inclined to do a
                > "real" survey after seeing what we have here. So once again, I thank you
                > all for the expertise and welcome any suggestions - it's great to learn so
                > much after being a group member for less than 24 hours!
                >
                >
                > Karen Sprague
                > Houston Zoo
                >
                >
                >
                > On Feb 3, 2011, at 9:29 AM, David_R_Smith@... wrote:
                >
                >>
                >> Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live
                >> bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box. Unless you are able to
                >> immobilize them and have one heck of a macro lens, how will key
                >> characters needed to ID even to genus be legible, much less suitable to
                >> ID to the species level?
                >>
                >> Would such photographic documentation meet the necessary standard to
                >> document a species presence? In one endangered bird survey,
                >> southwestern willow flycatcher, the biologist must hear the birds
                >> distinct call before it presence can be documented in a area. Empidonax
                >> flycatchers can't reliably be ID'd simply by sight. Given the color
                >> variations we see in Bombus specimens, would this even work for such a
                >> large bee?
                >>
                >> Dave Smith
                >> U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
                >> 323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
                >> Flagstaff, AZ 86001
                >> (928) 226-0614 x 109
                >> "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction" Dave Rosgen
                >
                >
              • Pierre Martineau
                Hi Karen, Karen s proposed freezer solution is very quick and efficient, but you incur a high risk of accidentally killing the bee if you leave it for too long
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 3, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Karen,

                  Karen's proposed freezer solution is very quick and efficient, but you incur a high risk of accidentally killing the bee if you leave it for too long (too long may be a matter of a few minutes). If you have more time at hand, you may want to put the bee in a fridge to cool it down to ~ 2 to 4 degrees (Celcius) instead. Fifteen to 30min are usually sufficient (how long really depends on the size of the bee and how much air there is in the container that holds the bee), and the bee will most likely be still alive if you leave it accidentally overnight.

                  Pierre
                  ----------
                  Pierre Martineau
                  pierrem at stanford dot edu

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: karen@...
                  To: "Karen Sprague" <panulirus@...>
                  Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2011 3:34:12 PM
                  Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Squeeze boxes for insects






                  If you put them in the freezer for a few minutes, you can slow them down
                  without killing them. You can then put them on a flower and they will
                  take a while to get moving again. Cheers, Karen

                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > Thank you to everyone who has replied, your input is much appreciated.
                  > Let me give a little background on my proposed project and myself... I am
                  > an aquatic biologist (though I work with herps at the moment), my
                  > specialty is aquatic arthropod and cephalopod husbandry. My hobby is
                  > insect-watching and as of late I have become very interested in
                  > pollinators, namely solitary bees. According to the experts I've spoken
                  > with here in Texas, there has not been much research done in the Houston
                  > area regarding what species are present.
                  >
                  > If my project is accepted, I will survey four gardens on Zoo grounds for
                  > bees. I'm hoping that thoroughly documenting the species I find with
                  > pictures may help entomologists identify the bees at least to genus.
                  > Although many of you may frown on this, I am not interested in collecting
                  > any specimens for ID. What I am interested in is getting our Zoo guests
                  > excited about gardening for wildlife, which would create more bee habitat
                  > in this incredibly over-developed city, lessen pesticide use and maybe
                  > drum up a little respect for insects. Our Zoo does not have an insect
                  > house, so this is the best project I could come up with for a small amount
                  > of grant money.
                  >
                  > The photos taken will be available for all to see (at some point) so
                  > interested parties can see what bees they might encounter in their yards.
                  > I realize that ID to family or genus level only may not be of use to the
                  > scientific community, but maybe someone out there will be inclined to do a
                  > "real" survey after seeing what we have here. So once again, I thank you
                  > all for the expertise and welcome any suggestions - it's great to learn so
                  > much after being a group member for less than 24 hours!
                  >
                  >
                  > Karen Sprague
                  > Houston Zoo
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Feb 3, 2011, at 9:29 AM, David_R_Smith@... wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >> Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live
                  >> bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box. Unless you are able to
                  >> immobilize them and have one heck of a macro lens, how will key
                  >> characters needed to ID even to genus be legible, much less suitable to
                  >> ID to the species level?
                  >>
                  >> Would such photographic documentation meet the necessary standard to
                  >> document a species presence? In one endangered bird survey,
                  >> southwestern willow flycatcher, the biologist must hear the birds
                  >> distinct call before it presence can be documented in a area. Empidonax
                  >> flycatchers can't reliably be ID'd simply by sight. Given the color
                  >> variations we see in Bombus specimens, would this even work for such a
                  >> large bee?
                  >>
                  >> Dave Smith
                  >> U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
                  >> 323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
                  >> Flagstaff, AZ 86001
                  >> (928) 226-0614 x 109
                  >> "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction" Dave Rosgen
                  >
                  >
                • Karen Sprague
                  You people are a wealth of information!!! Thank you so much for all your help - I m sure I ll have many more questions along the way... Karen Sprague Houston
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 3, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You people are a wealth of information!!!  Thank you so much for all your help - I'm sure I'll have many more questions along the way...

                    Karen  Sprague
                    Houston Zoo


                    On Feb 3, 2011, at 3:07 PM, Karen Sprague wrote:

                     

                    Hello all,


                    Thank you to everyone who has replied, your input is much appreciated.  Let me give a little background on my proposed project and myself...  I am an aquatic biologist (though I work with herps at the moment), my specialty is aquatic arthropod and cephalopod husbandry.  My hobby is insect-watching and as of late I have become very interested in pollinators, namely solitary bees.  According to the experts I've spoken with here in Texas, there has not been much research done in the Houston area regarding what species are present.

                    If my project is accepted, I will survey four gardens on Zoo grounds for bees.   I'm hoping that thoroughly documenting the species I find with pictures may help entomologists identify the bees at least to genus.  Although many of you may frown on this, I am not interested in collecting any specimens for ID.  What I am interested in is getting our Zoo guests excited about gardening for wildlife, which would create more bee habitat in this incredibly over-developed city, lessen pesticide use and maybe drum up a little respect for insects.  Our Zoo does not have an insect house, so this is the best project I could come up with for a small amount of grant money.  

                    The photos taken will be available for all to see (at some point) so interested parties can see what bees they might encounter in their yards.  I realize that ID to family or genus level only may not be of use to the scientific community, but maybe someone out there will be inclined to do a "real" survey after seeing what we have here.  So once again, I thank you all for the expertise and welcome any suggestions - it's great to learn so much after being a group member for less than 24 hours!


                    Karen Sprague
                    Houston Zoo



                    On Feb 3, 2011, at 9:29 AM, David_R_Smith@... wrote:


                    Not to sound pessimistic, but how do you intend to accurately ID live bees in hand or in a plastic squeeze box.  Unless you are able to immobilize them and have one heck of a macro lens, how will key characters needed to ID even to genus be legible, much less suitable to ID to the species level?

                    Would such photographic documentation meet the necessary standard to document a species presence?  In one endangered bird survey, southwestern willow flycatcher, the biologist must hear the birds distinct call before it presence can be documented in a area.  Empidonax flycatchers can't reliably be ID'd simply by sight.  Given the color variations we see in Bombus specimens, would this even work for such a large bee?

                    Dave Smith
                    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
                    323 N. Leroux St., Suite 101
                    Flagstaff, AZ  86001
                    (928) 226-0614 x 109
                    "Field data is the best cure for a precarious prediction"  Dave Rosgen



                  • barbara.abraham@hamptonu.edu
                    All, Does anyone have an electronic copy of Southwick s original lucky hits paper (J. Biol. Comp. Physiol. Ecol. Vol 7, 1982? Thanks! Barb Barbara J.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 7, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment

                      All,

                       

                      Does anyone have an electronic copy of Southwick’s original “lucky hits” paper (J. Biol. Comp. Physiol. Ecol. Vol 7,  1982?

                       

                      Thanks!

                       

                      Barb

                       

                      Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

                      Associate Professor

                      SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

                      Department of Biological Sciences

                      Hampton University

                      Hampton, VA  23668

                      757-727-5283

                      barbara.abraham@...

                       

                      The information contained in this message is intended only for the recipient, and may otherwise be privileged and confidential. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, please be aware that any dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify us by replying to the message and deleting it from your computer. This footnote also confirms that this email has been scanned for all viruses by the Hampton University Center for Information Technology Enterprise Systems service.
                    • T'ai Roulston
                      Bee Nest Afficionados: I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the
                      Message 10 of 18 , Mar 4, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Bee Nest Afficionados:

                        I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure like this. The top is all mud.

                        Does this look familiar to anyone?

                        T'ai




                        T'ai Roulston
                        Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
                        Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
                        University of Virginia



                      • Eric Mader
                        Hi T ai, This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons) commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very
                        Message 11 of 18 , Mar 4, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi T'ai,

                          This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons) commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very very familiar!

                          Cheers!

                          -Eric

                          On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 1:09 PM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
                          Bee Nest Afficionados:

                          I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure like this. The top is all mud.

                          Does this look familiar to anyone?

                          T'ai




                          T'ai Roulston
                          Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
                          Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
                          University of Virginia






                          --
                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Eric Mader
                          Assistant Pollinator Program Director
                              The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                          Assistant Professor of Extension
                              University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology

                          The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                          1971 – 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

                          4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                          eric@...
                          Tel: (503) 232-6639
                          Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                          Cell: (503) 989-3649
                          Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                          (日本語でどうぞ)

                          Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at: www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/

                          The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.

                          To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

                          NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                          Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                        • Dave Hunter
                          I agree with Eric. You’re probably looking at 3 different Osmia (same species) results. However, what is interesting is that you have 3 different types of
                          Message 12 of 18 , Mar 4, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment

                            I agree with Eric.  You’re probably looking at 3 different Osmia (same species) results. 

                             

                            However, what is interesting is that you have 3 different types of wall building.  Complete mud encasement, reworking all walls (double walls) on the lower left, and mostly single walls on the right.  Different mud in each case.  …and different pollen source between lower left and right.

                             

                            Dave Hunter

                            O. 425.949.7954

                            C. 206.851.1263

                            www.crownbees.com

                             Click below to hear the buzz!

                            Description: cid:image002.png@...4545C0Description: cid:image003.png@...4545C0Description: cid:image004.png@...4545C0

                             

                             

                            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Mader
                            Sent: Friday, March 04, 2011 1:27 PM
                            To: T'ai Roulston
                            Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] id bee nest from photo

                             

                             

                            Hi T'ai,

                            This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons) commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very very familiar!

                            Cheers!

                            -Eric

                            On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 1:09 PM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:

                            Bee Nest Afficionados:

                             

                            I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure like this. The top is all mud.

                             

                            Does this look familiar to anyone?

                             

                            T'ai

                             

                             

                            Description: cid:4B396076-59C7-45B9-A691-FE65BBFD9235@Blandy

                             

                            T'ai Roulston

                            Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia

                            Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.

                            University of Virginia

                             

                             

                             




                            --
                            ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Eric Mader
                            Assistant Pollinator Program Director
                                The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                            Assistant Professor of Extension
                                University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology

                            The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                            1971 – 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

                            4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                            eric@...
                            Tel: (503) 232-6639
                            Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                            Cell: (503) 989-3649
                            Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                            (日本語でどうぞ)

                            Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at: www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/

                            The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.

                            To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

                            NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                            Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
                            ----------------------------------------------------------------------

                          • Jack Neff
                            Although they are not typical, Osmia lignaria occasionally make nests like that in larger cavities. They usually do a better job with cell symmetry than that
                            Message 13 of 18 , Mar 4, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Although they are not typical, Osmia lignaria occasionally make nests like that in larger cavities. They usually do a better job with cell symmetry than that though.  The pale, dusty pollen could be oak or some other anemophilous thing.

                              best

                              Jack
                               
                              John L. Neff
                              Central Texas Melittological Institute
                              7307 Running Rope
                              Austin,TX 78731 USA
                              512-345-7219



                              From: T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...>
                              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Fri, March 4, 2011 3:09:15 PM
                              Subject: [beemonitoring] id bee nest from photo

                              Bee Nest Afficionados:

                              I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure like this. The top is all mud.

                              Does this look familiar to anyone?

                              T'ai




                              T'ai Roulston
                              Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
                              Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
                              University of Virginia




                            • Eric Mader
                              Hi Jil, I think the color variation in the mud is just a matter of the different patches of soil where the mother bee(s) collected mud (variations in clay
                              Message 14 of 18 , Mar 9, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Jil,

                                I think the color variation in the mud is just a matter of the
                                different patches of soil where the mother bee(s) collected mud
                                (variations in clay content, minerals, etc.). The yellow is obviously
                                pollen.

                                I am guessing that all of the cells were provisioned and capped, but
                                the open/empty ones on the bottom are the result of the photographer
                                lifting away the covering surface (maybe a stone or a brick, or
                                something), and probably dislodging the provisions (making them appear
                                empty).

                                T'ai can probably clarify the circumstances under which he found this.

                                Cheers!

                                -Eric

                                On Wed, Mar 9, 2011 at 10:33 AM, <Jil_Swearingen@...> wrote:
                                > Eric,
                                > Can you explain what I'm seeing here - the various colors of the cells and
                                > the full vs empty and the red-brick cells at the top? It's really
                                > fascinating and I'd like to understand what's going on here. You can reply
                                > to the whole group if you like...
                                > Thanks,
                                > Jil
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Eric Mader
                                > <eric@...>
                                > Sent by: To
                                > beemonitoring@yah "T'ai Roulston"
                                > oogroups.com <thr8z@...>
                                > cc
                                > beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                                > 03/04/2011 04:26 Subject
                                > PM Re: [beemonitoring] id bee nest
                                > from photo
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Hi T'ai,
                                >
                                > This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons)
                                > commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very
                                > very familiar!
                                >
                                > Cheers!
                                >
                                > -Eric
                                >
                                > On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 1:09 PM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
                                > Bee Nest Afficionados:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I
                                > gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the
                                > nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is
                                > pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure
                                > like this. The top is all mud.
                                >
                                > Does this look familiar to anyone?
                                >
                                > T'ai
                                >
                                >
                                > (Embedded image moved to file: pic16731.jpg)
                                >
                                > T'ai Roulston
                                > Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
                                > Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
                                > University of Virginia
                                > tai.roulston@...
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --
                                > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                > Eric Mader
                                > Assistant Pollinator Program Director The Xerces Society for
                                > Invertebrate Conservation
                                > Assistant Professor of Extension University of Minnesota, Department of
                                > Entomology
                                >
                                > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                > 1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!
                                >
                                > 4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                                > eric@...
                                > Tel: (503) 232-6639
                                > Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                                > Cell: (503) 989-3649
                                > Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                                > (日本語でどうぞ)
                                >
                                > Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
                                > www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
                                >
                                > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
                                > nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
                                > invertebrates and their habitat.
                                >
                                > To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please
                                > visit www.xerces.org.
                                >
                                > NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                                > Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and
                                > Butterflies
                                > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                >
                                >
                                >



                                --
                                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Eric Mader
                                Assistant Pollinator Program Director
                                The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                Assistant Professor of Extension
                                University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology

                                The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

                                4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                                eric@...
                                Tel: (503) 232-6639
                                Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                                Cell: (503) 989-3649
                                Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                                (日本語でどうぞ)

                                Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
                                www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/

                                The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
                                nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation
                                of invertebrates and their habitat.

                                To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work,
                                please visit www.xerces.org.

                                NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                                Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
                                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                              • Sandra_Lary@fws.gov
                                Interesting native bee article: http://www.gardendesign.com/yellow/bee-season?cmpid=enews030811 Sandra ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sandra J. Lary, Senior
                                Message 15 of 18 , Mar 9, 2011
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  Interesting native bee article:  

                                  http://www.gardendesign.com/yellow/bee-season?cmpid=enews030811


                                  Sandra

                                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                  Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist
                                  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

                                  Ecological Services-Coastal Program
                                  4R Fundy Rd, Falmouth ME 04105

                                  207-781-8364, ext. 19

                                • Charley Eiseman
                                  Hi Eric (and other bee nest aficionados), I m curious to hear how you would rule out the possibility that the closed cells in the top row were made by spider
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Mar 10, 2011
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi Eric (and other bee nest aficionados),

                                    I'm curious to hear how you would rule out the possibility that the closed cells in the top row were made by spider wasps (Auplopus or Phanagenia)--if, for instance, they had not been found in association with these obviously pollen-filled cells.  The examples of pompilid nests I have seen tend to have smoother walls and not be so neatly arranged, but I don't know if this is always the case.  Is this very lumpy appearance, with each individual mud pellet visible, typical of Osmia nests?

                                    Thanks,

                                    Charley Eiseman

                                    www.NorthernNaturalists.com

                                    2011/3/9 Eric Mader <eric@...>
                                     

                                    Hi Jil,

                                    I think the color variation in the mud is just a matter of the
                                    different patches of soil where the mother bee(s) collected mud
                                    (variations in clay content, minerals, etc.). The yellow is obviously
                                    pollen.

                                    I am guessing that all of the cells were provisioned and capped, but
                                    the open/empty ones on the bottom are the result of the photographer
                                    lifting away the covering surface (maybe a stone or a brick, or
                                    something), and probably dislodging the provisions (making them appear
                                    empty).

                                    T'ai can probably clarify the circumstances under which he found this.

                                    Cheers!

                                    -Eric

                                    On Wed, Mar 9, 2011 at 10:33 AM, <Jil_Swearingen@...> wrote:
                                    > Eric,
                                    > Can you explain what I'm seeing here - the various colors of the cells and
                                    > the full vs empty and the red-brick cells at the top? It's really
                                    > fascinating and I'd like to understand what's going on here. You can reply
                                    > to the whole group if you like...
                                    > Thanks,
                                    > Jil
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Eric Mader
                                    > <eric@...>
                                    > Sent by: To
                                    > beemonitoring@yah "T'ai Roulston"
                                    > oogroups.com <thr8z@...>
                                    > cc
                                    > beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                                    > 03/04/2011 04:26 Subject
                                    > PM Re: [beemonitoring] id bee nest
                                    > from photo
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >


                                    > Hi T'ai,
                                    >
                                    > This looks exactly like the nests my Osmia (both lignaria and cornifrons)
                                    > commonly produce when tunnel-like cavities are not available. This is very
                                    > very familiar!
                                    >
                                    > Cheers!
                                    >
                                    > -Eric
                                    >
                                    > On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 1:09 PM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
                                    > Bee Nest Afficionados:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > I received this photo today from someone who attended a bee talk I
                                    > gave. The photo was taken in northern Virginia May 10, 2006 and the
                                    > nest cells were between two pieces of siding. I presume the yellow is
                                    > pollen and these are bee cells, but I've never seen a nest structure
                                    > like this. The top is all mud.
                                    >
                                    > Does this look familiar to anyone?
                                    >
                                    > T'ai
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > (Embedded image moved to file: pic16731.jpg)

                                    >
                                    > T'ai Roulston
                                    > Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
                                    > Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
                                    > University of Virginia
                                    > tai.roulston@...
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    > ----------------------------------------------------------
                                    > Eric Mader
                                    > Assistant Pollinator Program Director The Xerces Society for
                                    > Invertebrate Conservation
                                    > Assistant Professor of Extension University of Minnesota, Department of
                                    > Entomology
                                    >
                                    > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                    > 1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!
                                    >
                                    > 4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                                    > eric@...
                                    > Tel: (503) 232-6639
                                    > Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                                    > Cell: (503) 989-3649
                                    > Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                                    > (日本語でどうぞ)
                                    >
                                    > Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
                                    > www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
                                    >
                                    > The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
                                    > nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
                                    > invertebrates and their habitat.
                                    >
                                    > To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please
                                    > visit www.xerces.org.
                                    >
                                    > NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                                    > Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and
                                    > Butterflies
                                    > ----------------------------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >

                                    --
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------
                                    Eric Mader
                                    Assistant Pollinator Program Director
                                    The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                    Assistant Professor of Extension
                                    University of Minnesota, Department of Entomology

                                    The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
                                    1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

                                    4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR 97215, USA
                                    eric@...
                                    Tel: (503) 232-6639
                                    Toll free: 1-855-232-6639
                                    Cell: (503) 989-3649
                                    Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society
                                    (日本語でどうぞ)

                                    Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
                                    www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/

                                    The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
                                    nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation
                                    of invertebrates and their habitat.

                                    To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work,
                                    please visit www.xerces.org.

                                    NEW BOOK NOW AVAILABLE:
                                    Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies
                                    ----------------------------------------------------------

                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.