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BIML Update - DL Search Tips/Dianthidium/Anthophorula/State Records/Agapostemon

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  • Sam Droege
    January 3 2010 Update Adding Discoverlife Search Boxes to your Browser Page Michael Orr sent in these useful add-ons to Mozilla s Firefox browser. What these
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 3, 2011
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      January 3 2010 Update



           Adding Discoverlife Search Boxes to your Browser Page

      Michael Orr sent in these useful add-ons to Mozilla's Firefox browser.  What these allow you to do is to put the Discoverlife search box up in the right hand corner of your browser with Google and Wikipedia etc.   That way you can search on bee names, be species pages, pull up pictures from albums, and pull up database records without having to go home page first.

      Here is the extension page for the ability to add search engines:
      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3682/
      Here is the extension page for the ability to scroll through the search engines using the mouse wheel:

      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3696/

      Also note that Discoverlife species pages now have the clickable species map automatically incorporated into it.

      We have updated the Apoidea page on Discoverlife to give a more complete list of guides

      http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Apoidea#Identification

      Note also that we have included the names of eastern North American species of genera that only have one species in that genus.  The reason for that is that Rob Jean is updating the Genera guide to include the western genera (you can try it out, but it is not quite complete yet) and since there are not guides for some of the singleton eastern species we have included their names.

      We have also updated our links to the distribution maps for the genera at:

      http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Apoidea#Geographic%20distribution

           Michael Orr has updated the Dianthidum guide with the following couplet

      D. curvatum vs D. ulkei, note that the two may be easily confused when looking at D. ulkei s RED-LEGGED FORM
             
      D. curvatum - Head, vertex, there is a thin red or yellow marking that extends along the rear of the head behind the ocelli and runs down along the gena or cheek to about one-third to one-fifth of the way from the top of the eye - Thorax, forecoxae, short, but pronounced and very easily recognized, rear-facing SPINE PRESENT posteriorly near the connection of the coxa and trochanter - Thorax, scutum, anteromedial pit density and size of pits approximately the same throughout or only SLIGHLTY less dense in the anteromedial area of scutum near the head when compared to lateral and posterior areas, if smaller then only slightly so, pits are nearly touching but do not overlap - Abdomen, T1, color pattern, dorsal surface of T1 largely yellow, the yellow present in one continuous latitudinal band across the segment, often with one black spot or cut-out on each side - Size, in direct comparison, larger    

      D. ulkei - Head, vertex, there are NO MARKINGS behind the ocelli, markings are restricted to narrow pale yellow oblongs paralleling the boundary of the upper third of the compound eye - Thorax, forecoxae, SPINE ABSENT or greatly reduced, nothing more than a slight bump present, not coming to a distinctly acute point - Thorax, scutum, anteromedial pit density, pitting extremely dense anteromedially, with pits becoming CLEARLY SMALLER and nearly indistinguishable anteriorly and OVERLAPPING as such, pit diameter anteromedially often becoming several times smaller than those of the lateral and posterior areas - Abdomen, T1, color pattern, dorsal surface of T1 either roughly equally pale yellow and black or with more black than pale yellow, yellow latitudinal band interrupted laterally and thus forming three distinct patches of yellow which are almost entirely surrounded by black except sometimes at the lateral edges - Size, in direct comparison, smaller  

           Anthophorula micheneri

      A male Anthophorula micheneri was discovered among material collected in the fall of 2010 from Banshee Reeks a small park in Loudon County northern Virginia.  The nearest published record is from Mississippi.  An additional 2 Anthophorula female specimens from Northern VA had been found in the 1980's in the Smithsonian collection.  At the time I wasn't 100 percent sure of A. micheneri, but now it seems most likely because the male is much more distinctive.

          New State Records


      Andrena nuda - WV, Ohio County, a nice series collected by the indefatigable Jane Whitaker
      Coelioxy rufitarsis - WV, Greenbriar County, a male, also collected by Jane


      Agapostemon - Sam added the following character for separating out a set of western male Agapostemons

      Male, A. femoratus, A. obliquus, A. texanus and A. angelicus, combination of characters
      A. femoratus - Femur greatly swollen, width GREATER than half the length - UNIQUE in having the ridge at the base of the underside of the basitarsus PROMINENT clearly rising above the surrounding hairs - Apical groove on the underside of the basitarsus is CLEARLY PRESENT and ends in an amber colored tip - S5-6 greater than 50 percent yellow

      A. obliquus - Hind femur very swollen, but less so than A. femorata, width about EQUAL to half the length - Ridge on basitarsus so inconspicuous that it is usually impossible to detect and never rises above the surrounding hairs - Apical groove on basistarsus not present - S5-6 greater than 50 percent yellow

      A. texanus and A. angelicus - Hind femur not  as greatly swollen, width less than HALF the length - Ridge on basitarsus so inconspicuous that it is usually impossible to detect and never rises above the surrounding hairs - Apical groove on basistarsus not present - S5-6 LESS THAN 50 percent yellow


      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      I cannot say
      which is which:
      the glowing
      plum blossom is
      the spring night's moon.


      Izumi Shikibu translated by Jane Hirshfield and
      Mariko Aratani
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