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RE: [beemonitoring] 20 Common Bee Species in Pennsylvania

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  • Stoner, Kimberly
    I agree with T’ai Roulston on this. I have given several talks recently to organic landscaping and farming groups, and I talk about the common genera,
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 16, 2010
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      I agree with T’ai Roulston on this.  I have given several talks recently to organic landscaping and farming groups, and I talk about the common genera, highlighting a few particularly interesting or common species.  And, I lifted that approach from mostly from you, Sam, and the one-day course (plus a day of field collecting) that you and John Ascher taught in CT.

       

      Kim Stoner

      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of T'ai Roulston
      Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2010 10:23 AM
      To: Sam Droege
      Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] 20 Common Bee Species in Pennsylvania

       

       

      Sam et al:

       

      This sounds like a really nice idea. I'm also giving talks of this sort and trying to balance specificity with generality. Some of the species on the list are truly distinctive before one hits the microscope and the DiscoverLife web site, but others are not. I wonder about the wisdom of the species approach in this list rather than a broader group in some cases. Lasioglossum is the first to come to mind. It might be more valuable to describe the traits in common for the group and illustrate a few common species, but not with the idea that very many people are going to put a species name on Lasioglossum that will stand the test of time or Jason Gibbs. Same for Hylaeus and even Ceratina. They are similar enough morphologically and behaviorally that it is probably more meaningful to recognize the group than the species for this kind of audience and intention. With a list of species in hand it is very tempting to make everything one encounters into something on the list.

       

      There are some species with very distinctive behaviors to tip off interesting ecology. An obvious one already on the list is Peponapis, sleeping in the squash flowers. Another not on the list would be Anthidium manicatum (rather than A. oblongatum --unless it also has the behavior). Anthidium manicatum males can be readily seen where abundant (certainly northern Virginia at least, probably Pennsylvania as well) instigating high speed collisions with bees as large (and much larger than they are) as bumble bees and chasing them out of flowers to maintain high nectar rewards in the flowers for the Anthidium females.  I had a group of students watching this startling and entertaining behavior for about half an hour last summer. Alas, that such an interesting bee is not native (just like A. oblongatum).

       

      Is Megachile rotundata that common in Pennsylvania? M. brevis is much more common here (and also native). Would it be better to just emphasize the group Megachile, their features in common, their ecology (granted, there is some variation in nesting ecology) and their frequent association with either legumes or Asteraceae rather than try to pick a species that people might see? If people watch the areas around their own gardens, they will see Megachile, but there is a good chance they won't see either of the species listed or any other choice of two in the group.

       

      I think my choice would be emphasizing very distinctive and common species or groups of species that share morphology and ecology. It would require more illustration to account for variation in species, but I think would be more rewarding in the end. 

       

      T'ai

       

      On Dec 15, 2010, at 6:57 PM, Sam Droege wrote:




      All: 


      Alex Surcică recently asked me what a list of 20 common bees might look like for Pennsylvania, so he could start introducing them gently to Master Gardener's and others who had little understanding of the habits and types of Native Bees in their gardens and yards.    The idea is not to overwhelm them with information and the nuance of 400 different life histories, but a petit introduction, something that could be illustrated with pictures and for which specimens could be easily obtained for them to view.  Some may take that to greater depth, but others would simply be informed and gain exposure to a world that is not part of the usual training in butterfly and common insect ID's. 

      So that list is below for you to make suggestions about and propose additions and subtractions. 

      In addition to this I have been thinking about how one would teach a one day course on native bees to the general (but interested) natural history buff or ... gardener. 

      I am wondering if a lot could be accomplished with specimens and a cheap botanical magnification loop plus a picture book of bee types with Peterson style arrows to important features.   

      I know many of you have done such workshop and have ideas about what works and what doesn't.  So I would be interested in hearing your thoughts. 

      The proposed bee list for PA is below....one could see such a think developing for many states (and regions of states out West) with simple picture guides, similar but not as extensive to what has been done already with Laurence Packer's book and in places within NAAPC and Xerces.  As many of these species would repeat across states, perhaps generic jpegs could be developed that show the important features and people could download them to create their own posters or hand books.

      Xylocopa virginica 
      Osmia taurus/cornifrons
       
      Andrena wilkella
       
      Megachile rotundata
       
      Megachile mendica
       
      Augochlora pura
       
      Augochlorella aurata
       
      Agapostemon virescens
       
      Lasioglossum imitatum
       
      Lasioglossum versatum
       
      Bombus impatiens
       
      Halictus ligatus
       
      Ceratina calcarata
       
      Anthidium oblongatum
       
      Apis mellifera
       
      Peponapis pruinosa
       
      Andrena nasonii
       
      Colletes inaequalis
       
      Hylaeus mesilliae
       
      Melissodes bimaculata
       

      Thanks

      sam


      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov 

      Aspens 
      All day and night, save winter, every weather,
      Above the inn, the smithy, and the shop,
      The aspens at the cross-roads talk together
      Of rain, until their last leaves fall from the top. 
      Out of the blacksmith's cavern comes the ringing
      Of hammer, shoe, and anvil; out of the inn
      The clink, the hum, the roar, the random singing—
      The sounds that for these fifty years have been. 
      The whisper of the aspens is not drowned,
      And over lightness pane and footless road,
      Empty as sky, with every other sound
      Not ceasing, calls their ghosts from their abode, 
      A silent smithy, a silent inn, nor fails
      In the bare moonlight or the thick furred gloom,
      In tempest or the night of nightingales,
      To turn the cross-roads to a ghostly room. 
      And it would be the same were no house near.
      Over all sorts of weather, men, and times,
      Aspens must shake their leaves and men may hear
      But need not listen, more than to my rhymes. 
      Whatever wind blows, while they and I have leaves
      WE cannot other than an aspen be
      That ceaselessly, unreasonably grieves,
       
      Or so men think who like a different tree. 

          - Edward Thomas

       

       

      T'ai Roulston

      Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia

      Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.

      University of Virginia

       

       

       

    • Eric Mader
      Hey Folks, Some of you might already be a aware of this, but a similar resource specifically for Pennsylvania is the PA Native Bee Survey Citizen Scientist
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 16, 2010
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        Hey Folks,
         
        Some of you might already be a aware of this, but a similar resource specifically for Pennsylvania is the PA Native Bee Survey Citizen Scientist Monitoring Protocol, developed by Penn State, the Pennsylvania Dept. of Ag., and Xerces a few years ago. 
         
        The classroom training handbook is available here:
         
         
        And a pocket-field guide is available here:
         
         
        I'm not sure to what extent the Penn State Master Gardeners are still conducting visual bee surveys (I'm guessing that Leo Donovall or Dennis vanEngelsdorp would know the latest status of the project).
         
        From what I know, this has been a very successful project for engaging a lay audience in pollinator issues, and training people with little formal background in entomology to identify the broad taxonomic groups of native bees all around them.
         
        As an aside, Xerces is working with Penn State now on some more robust profiles of individual species with close associations to specific crops. Those profiles will be used in some upcoming farmer fact sheets, and if anyone is interested, they can follow up with me for more info.
         
        Cheers!
         
        -Eric
         
         

        2010/12/15 Sam Droege <sdroege@...>
         


        All:


        Alex Surcică recently asked me what a list of 20 common bees might look like for Pennsylvania, so he could start introducing them gently to Master Gardener's and others who had little understanding of the habits and types of Native Bees in their gardens and yards.    The idea is not to overwhelm them with information and the nuance of 400 different life histories, but a petit introduction, something that could be illustrated with pictures and for which specimens could be easily obtained for them to view.  Some may take that to greater depth, but others would simply be informed and gain exposure to a world that is not part of the usual training in butterfly and common insect ID's.

        So that list is below for you to make suggestions about and propose additions and subtractions.

        In addition to this I have been thinking about how one would teach a one day course on native bees to the general (but interested) natural history buff or ... gardener.

        I am wondering if a lot could be accomplished with specimens and a cheap botanical magnification loop plus a picture book of bee types with Peterson style arrows to important features.  

        I know many of you have done such workshop and have ideas about what works and what doesn't.  So I would be interested in hearing your thoughts.

        The proposed bee list for PA is below....one could see such a think developing for many states (and regions of states out West) with simple picture guides, similar but not as extensive to what has been done already with Laurence Packer's book and in places within NAAPC and Xerces.  As many of these species would repeat across states, perhaps generic jpegs could be developed that show the important features and people could download them to create their own posters or hand books.

        Xylocopa virginica
        Osmia taurus/cornifrons

        Andrena wilkella

        Megachile rotundata

        Megachile mendica

        Augochlora pura

        Augochlorella aurata

        Agapostemon virescens

        Lasioglossum imitatum

        Lasioglossum versatum

        Bombus impatiens

        Halictus ligatus

        Ceratina calcarata

        Anthidium oblongatum

        Apis mellifera

        Peponapis pruinosa

        Andrena nasonii

        Colletes inaequalis

        Hylaeus mesilliae

        Melissodes bimaculata


        Thanks

        sam


        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

        Aspens
        All day and night, save winter, every weather,
        Above the inn, the smithy, and the shop,
        The aspens at the cross-roads talk together
        Of rain, until their last leaves fall from the top.
        Out of the blacksmith's cavern comes the ringing
        Of hammer, shoe, and anvil; out of the inn
        The clink, the hum, the roar, the random singing—
        The sounds that for these fifty years have been.
        The whisper of the aspens is not drowned,
        And over lightness pane and footless road,
        Empty as sky, with every other sound
        Not ceasing, calls their ghosts from their abode,
        A silent smithy, a silent inn, nor fails
        In the bare moonlight or the thick furred gloom,
        In tempest or the night of nightingales,
        To turn the cross-roads to a ghostly room.
        And it would be the same were no house near.
        Over all sorts of weather, men, and times,
        Aspens must shake their leaves and men may hear
        But need not listen, more than to my rhymes.
        Whatever wind blows, while they and I have leaves
        WE cannot other than an aspen be
        That ceaselessly, unreasonably grieves,

        Or so men think who like a different tree.

            - Edward Thomas




        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        Eric Mader
        Assistant Pollinator Program Director
        The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
        Tel: 503-232-6639 Fax: 503-233-6794
        Email: eric@...
        Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society

        Assistant Professor of Extension
        University of Minnesota - Department of Entomology
        Email: made0002@...

        The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. Our Pollinator Conservation Program works to support the sustainability and profitability of farms while protecting pollinator insects. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

        Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
        http://www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Alex Surcica
        Hi, all: I m preparing two pollinator educational programs for the fruit and vegetable growers in my area. Part of the program will be a one-hour, hands-on bee
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 16, 2010
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          Hi, all:

           

          I’m preparing two pollinator educational programs for the fruit and vegetable growers in my area. Part of the program will be a one-hour, hands-on bee identification. My goal is to show growers the 20 most commonly encountered bee species on their farms, which are or might be economically important. As some of you mentioned, in certain cases will be easier to present them a group of species rather than a single species. I agree with that, but I would love to get your opinions with regard to what are the most economically important bee species for farmers and what crops each of them visit.

           

          Thank you,

          Alex

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam Droege
          Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2010 6:58 PM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [beemonitoring] 20 Common Bee Species in Pennsylvania

           

           


          All:


          Alex Surcică recently asked me what a list of 20 common bees might look like for Pennsylvania, so he could start introducing them gently to Master Gardener's and others who had little understanding of the habits and types of Native Bees in their gardens and yards.    The idea is not to overwhelm them with information and the nuance of 400 different life histories, but a petit introduction, something that could be illustrated with pictures and for which specimens could be easily obtained for them to view.  Some may take that to greater depth, but others would simply be informed and gain exposure to a world that is not part of the usual training in butterfly and common insect ID's.

          So that list is below for you to make suggestions about and propose additions and subtractions.

          In addition to this I have been thinking about how one would teach a one day course on native bees to the general (but interested) natural history buff or ... gardener.

          I am wondering if a lot could be accomplished with specimens and a cheap botanical magnification loop plus a picture book of bee types with Peterson style arrows to important features.  

          I know many of you have done such workshop and have ideas about what works and what doesn't.  So I would be interested in hearing your thoughts.

          The proposed bee list for PA is below....one could see such a think developing for many states (and regions of states out West) with simple picture guides, similar but not as extensive to what has been done already with Laurence Packer's book and in places within NAAPC and Xerces.  As many of these species would repeat across states, perhaps generic jpegs could be developed that show the important features and people could download them to create their own posters or hand books.

          Xylocopa virginica
          Osmia taurus/cornifrons

          Andrena wilkella

          Megachile rotundata

          Megachile mendica

          Augochlora pura

          Augochlorella aurata

          Agapostemon virescens

          Lasioglossum imitatum

          Lasioglossum versatum

          Bombus impatiens

          Halictus ligatus

          Ceratina calcarata

          Anthidium oblongatum

          Apis mellifera

          Peponapis pruinosa

          Andrena nasonii

          Colletes inaequalis

          Hylaeus mesilliae

          Melissodes bimaculata


          Thanks

          sam


          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

          Aspens
          All day and night, save winter, every weather,
          Above the inn, the smithy, and the shop,
          The aspens at the cross-roads talk together
          Of rain, until their last leaves fall from the top.
          Out of the blacksmith's cavern comes the ringing
          Of hammer, shoe, and anvil; out of the inn
          The clink, the hum, the roar, the random singing—
          The sounds that for these fifty years have been.
          The whisper of the aspens is not drowned,
          And over lightness pane and footless road,
          Empty as sky, with every other sound
          Not ceasing, calls their ghosts from their abode,
          A silent smithy, a silent inn, nor fails
          In the bare moonlight or the thick furred gloom,
          In tempest or the night of nightingales,
          To turn the cross-roads to a ghostly room.
          And it would be the same were no house near.
          Over all sorts of weather, men, and times,
          Aspens must shake their leaves and men may hear
          But need not listen, more than to my rhymes.
          Whatever wind blows, while they and I have leaves
          WE cannot other than an aspen be
          That ceaselessly, unreasonably grieves,

          Or so men think who like a different tree.

              - Edward Thomas

        • Mace Vaughan
          Hello everyone, I also recommend going to the great publication on Native Bee Benefits that Rachael Winfree and Neal Williams put together for PA and NJ. It
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 16, 2010
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            Hello everyone,

             

            I also recommend going to the great publication on Native Bee Benefits that Rachael Winfree and Neal Williams put together for PA and NJ.  It has great summaries of the most important bees from their research.

             

            http://www.xerces.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/pa-nj-native-bee-benefits1.pdf

             

            Best,

            Mace

             

            _______________________________________________
            Mace Vaughan
            Pollinator Program Director, Entomologist/Educator
            Joint Pollinator Conservation Specialist for the
                 USDA-NRCS West National Technology Support Center

            The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
            4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, OR  97215-3252 USA
            office: 503-232-6639  fax: 503-233-6794 

            mobile: 503-753-6000  NRCS: 503-273-2442
            email:  mace@... 

            Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:

            http://www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/


            The Xerces Society is an international, nonprofit organization that

            protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their

            habitat. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our

            work, please visit http://www.xerces.org/
            _______________________________________________

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alex Surcica
            Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2010 11:29 AM
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] 20 Common Bee Species in Pennsylvania

             

             

            Hi, all:

             

            I’m preparing two pollinator educational programs for the fruit and vegetable growers in my area. Part of the program will be a one-hour, hands-on bee identification. My goal is to show growers the 20 most commonly encountered bee species on their farms, which are or might be economically important. As some of you mentioned, in certain cases will be easier to present them a group of species rather than a single species. I agree with that, but I would love to get your opinions with regard to what are the most economically important bee species for farmers and what crops each of them visit.

             

            Thank you,

            Alex

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam Droege
            Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2010 6:58 PM
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [beemonitoring] 20 Common Bee Species in Pennsylvania

             

             


            All:


            Alex Surcică recently asked me what a list of 20 common bees might look like for Pennsylvania, so he could start introducing them gently to Master Gardener's and others who had little understanding of the habits and types of Native Bees in their gardens and yards.    The idea is not to overwhelm them with information and the nuance of 400 different life histories, but a petit introduction, something that could be illustrated with pictures and for which specimens could be easily obtained for them to view.  Some may take that to greater depth, but others would simply be informed and gain exposure to a world that is not part of the usual training in butterfly and common insect ID's.

            So that list is below for you to make suggestions about and propose additions and subtractions.

            In addition to this I have been thinking about how one would teach a one day course on native bees to the general (but interested) natural history buff or ... gardener.

            I am wondering if a lot could be accomplished with specimens and a cheap botanical magnification loop plus a picture book of bee types with Peterson style arrows to important features.  

            I know many of you have done such workshop and have ideas about what works and what doesn't.  So I would be interested in hearing your thoughts.

            The proposed bee list for PA is below....one could see such a think developing for many states (and regions of states out West) with simple picture guides, similar but not as extensive to what has been done already with Laurence Packer's book and in places within NAAPC and Xerces.  As many of these species would repeat across states, perhaps generic jpegs could be developed that show the important features and people could download them to create their own posters or hand books.

            Xylocopa virginica
            Osmia taurus/cornifrons

            Andrena wilkella

            Megachile rotundata

            Megachile mendica

            Augochlora pura

            Augochlorella aurata

            Agapostemon virescens

            Lasioglossum imitatum

            Lasioglossum versatum

            Bombus impatiens

            Halictus ligatus

            Ceratina calcarata

            Anthidium oblongatum

            Apis mellifera

            Peponapis pruinosa

            Andrena nasonii

            Colletes inaequalis

            Hylaeus mesilliae

            Melissodes bimaculata


            Thanks

            sam


            Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
            Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

            Aspens
            All day and night, save winter, every weather,
            Above the inn, the smithy, and the shop,
            The aspens at the cross-roads talk together
            Of rain, until their last leaves fall from the top.
            Out of the blacksmith's cavern comes the ringing
            Of hammer, shoe, and anvil; out of the inn
            The clink, the hum, the roar, the random singing—
            The sounds that for these fifty years have been.
            The whisper of the aspens is not drowned,
            And over lightness pane and footless road,
            Empty as sky, with every other sound
            Not ceasing, calls their ghosts from their abode,
            A silent smithy, a silent inn, nor fails
            In the bare moonlight or the thick furred gloom,
            In tempest or the night of nightingales,
            To turn the cross-roads to a ghostly room.
            And it would be the same were no house near.
            Over all sorts of weather, men, and times,
            Aspens must shake their leaves and men may hear
            But need not listen, more than to my rhymes.
            Whatever wind blows, while they and I have leaves
            WE cannot other than an aspen be
            That ceaselessly, unreasonably grieves,

            Or so men think who like a different tree.

                - Edward Thomas

          • Matthew Shepherd
            Good morning everyone, I get the daily digest, so am a little behind in joining this conversation. Like others who work with grower, gardeners, etc., I ve been
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 17, 2010
            • 0 Attachment

              Good morning everyone,

               

              I get the daily digest, so am a little behind in joining this conversation. Like others who work with grower, gardeners, etc., I’ve been asked many time what the common bees are in an area. Since bird lists or butterfly lists are so commonly available, it’s no surprise that people ask.

               

              I’m very happy to say that our new book will be released in late February. Published by Storey Publishing, Attracting Native Pollinators includes plenty of information about the natural history of bee, butterflies, wasps, flies, and beetles, plus guidance on choosing plants, creating nest sites, etc. However, of most relevance to this discussion, the book has a section on bee of North America containing detailed profiles of 30+ common or abundant bee genera. The profiles include basic ID, nesting and foraging habits, and any interesting factoids. This is not a field guide akin to the Kaufmann or NWF guides—photos are limited to one per genus—but a more in depth treatment of bees people are likely to encounter.

               

              There is more information on our website, www.xerces.org. Release is slated for late February.

               

              Matthew

               

              _____________________________________________

              The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

              A nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through

              the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.

               

              Matthew Shepherd

              Senior Conservation Associate

              mdshepherd@...

              4828 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Portland, OR 97215

              Tel: 503-232 6639

              Cell: 503-807 1577

              Fax: 503-233 6794

              www.xerces.org

              _____________________________________________

               

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