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Best and most comprehensive article on CCD yet

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  • pollinator2001
    http://www.lab-times.org/editorial/e_173.html While this article specifically concerns honeybees, it is of great interest to those conserned about wild bee
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 4, 2010
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      http://www.lab-times.org/editorial/e_173.html

      While this article specifically concerns honeybees, it is of great interest to those conserned about wild bee species as well. Honeybees have more research and more protectors, and may well serve as indicators as to what is happening with wild bees.

      Dave
      SC
      http://pollinator.com/blog
    • Sandra_Lary@fws.gov
      Could the beemon or pollinator groups respond to whether this 2009 paper changes the previously held belief that there was/is no native honey bee to North
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 6, 2010

      Could the beemon or pollinator groups respond to whether this 2009 paper changes the previously held belief that there was/is no native honey bee to North America?

      Thank you for any feedback, thoughts, etc.

      Sandra

      Sandra J. Lary, Senior F&W Biologist
      USFWS-Ecological Services
      Gulf of Maine Coastal Program
      Falmouth Maine
      207-781-8364, ext. 19


    • John S. Ascher
      It depends on what the meaning of the words was/is is and also on the meaning of North America. The paper in question describes a native true (Apis) honey
      Message 3 of 4 , Dec 6, 2010
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        It depends on what the meaning of the words "was/is" is and also on the
        meaning of "North America."

        The paper in question describes a native true (Apis) honey bee in what is
        now Nevada in the Middle Miocene, but there is no evidence that these
        persisted into the Pliocene much less the Pleistocene, so there was likely
        a very long period of geologic time when there were no Apis in the New
        World during which time our Recent native bee fauna and its floral hosts
        assembled and evolved.

        The authors point out other examples, notably gingkos and horses, of
        organisms found in (native to) North America long ago that then
        disappeared for a very long time subsequent to being introduced by humans.

        There are native stingless honey bees in southern North America, i.e.
        Mexico and Central America, but these are known from America North of
        Mexico only from an fossils (the famous Cretotrigona prisca from New
        Jersey).

        The Western Honey Bee Apis mellifera must still be considered an exotic
        species in the New World.

        John


        > Could the beemon or pollinator groups respond to whether this 2009 paper
        > changes the previously held belief that there was/is no native honey bee
        > to North America?
        >
        > Thank you for any feedback, thoughts, etc.
        >
        > Sandra
        >
        > Sandra J. Lary, Senior F&W Biologist
        > USFWS-Ecological Services
        > Gulf of Maine Coastal Program
        > Falmouth Maine
        > 207-781-8364, ext. 19
        >
        >
        >


        --
        John S. Ascher, Ph.D.
        Bee Database Project Manager
        Division of Invertebrate Zoology
        American Museum of Natural History
        Central Park West @ 79th St.
        New York, NY 10024-5192
        work phone: 212-496-3447
        mobile phone: 917-407-0378
      • pollinator2001
        In response to my posting, I received an e-mail objecting to my statement that honeybees have more protection than wild bees. Because it was a private e-mail,
        Message 4 of 4 , Dec 7, 2010
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          In response to my posting, I received an e-mail objecting to my statement that honeybees have more protection than wild bees.

          Because it was a private e-mail, I cannot post the comments here, but perhaps I was not sufficiently specific in my statement, so I will post my response, for clarification:

          I've found that anyone who works in a public job (research, extension) is highly reluctant to take on pesticide misuse (job security perhaps?). And the pesticide cops here in SC, very pointedly exclude wild bees from pesticide label protection.

          On the other hand, beekeepers like myself have been active and vocal in trying to get enforcement of label directions. The label "run-around" that is often recommended (ie. notify beekeepers) offers NO protection at all for wild bees.

          Moreover, hives that had damage usually got our best efforts at recovery, including feeding, removal of contaminated frames of pollen, and sometimes combining two or more hives - better one hive surviving than two or more weak ones dying over the winter.

          I am sure you understand that I am glad that wild bees are getting more attention, and thus may be getting more protection. But all it takes is one severe "hit" at the wrong time to do some serious damage to a species in the area. And I think you'll agree that it's easier (albeit expensive) to replace lost honeybees than to replace lost wild bees.

          Thanks for your comments.

          Dave
          Retired pollination contractor



          --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "pollinator2001" <Pollinator@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > http://www.lab-times.org/editorial/e_173.html
          >
          > While this article specifically concerns honeybees, it is of great interest to those conserned about wild bee species as well. Honeybees have more research and more protectors, and may well serve as indicators as to what is happening with wild bees.
          >
          > Dave
          > SC
          > http://pollinator.com/blog


          --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "pollinator2001" <Pollinator@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > http://www.lab-times.org/editorial/e_173.html
          >
          > While this article specifically concerns honeybees, it is of great interest to those conserned about wild bee species as well. Honeybees have more research and more protectors, and may well serve as indicators as to what is happening with wild bees.
          >
          > Dave
          > SC
          > http://pollinator.com/blog
          >
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