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BIML updates - State Records, County Finder, Nomada

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  • Sam Droege
    New State Records Paranthidium jugatorium - Michigan, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Seashore - Interestingly this was not an isolated individual, but one of
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2010
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      New State Records

      Paranthidium jugatorium - Michigan, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Seashore - Interestingly this was not an isolated individual, but one of many that were captured in the area.  There seems to be a tendency for this species to be, on the landscape level, quite rare, but where found, common.  Something for someone to look into....

      County Finder

      If you ever need to know what county a latitude and longitude is found in you can use this slick website:

      http://labs.silverbiology.com/countylookup/

      Nomada Notions

      Nomada - A group with problems.  We have started to work our way West with this group and continue to use molecular information to resolve species.  ... A slow process.   For North America there are roughly 500 Nomada names proposed in the literature and John Ascher has those up on Discoverlife.  Of the 320 or so names that are currently considered accepted, far over half of them have no specimen records associated with them in the online bee databases, many more have just 1 or 2 records some of which may be the type and another specimen associated with the original description.  Only a handful of specimens have substantial numbers of records and after looking at many museum holdings....many of those records can't be trusted.   This is not a new discovery as the historic literature is full of discussions of these problems with descriptions of "new" species often ending with phrases implying that it might just be the missing male of X or that it could just be a variation of y, but for some reason they felt compelled to add another name to the clouds of names that existed.  A major part of the problem is that wing veination and the extent of markings were often primary reasons for creating new species, both features we now know from molecular data to be subject to a great deal of intraspecific variation.   Below is a classic and surprisingly candid quote is from Robertson in a 1903 publication on Nomada species:

       
      "There has been enough confusion in this group to suit the most
      stupid of lumpers. It takes a mystagogue to identify a species from a
      description of its ornaments. Such descriptions are regular pitfalls, regular
      synonym-traps. "


      So, here are a few scratchings into that pile

      Males
       
      N. utahensis vs N. vincta - Based on a small number of specimens

      N. utahensis - Scape not clearly swollen, similar to other Nomada species, approximately 1.25 to 1.5 times the width of the flagellar segments - In direct comparison, yellow on thorax more extensive, lateral sides of scutum lined with yellow, axillae yellow, scutellum and metanotum almost entirely yellow, rear face of propodeum almost completley yellow on either side of propodeal,  triangle yellow on mesepisturnum runs from the anterior edge and extends as a band nearly to the metepisturnum, yellow dot present on mound on mesepisturnm below tegula - Bands of yellow on T2-4 WIDE, wider than the band of dark integument lining the rim - Sternites with more extensive yellow, S6 with yellow - Mostly Rocky Mountains

      N. vincta - Scape clearly swollen, approximately twice the width of the flagellar segments - In direct comparison, yellow on thorax more extensive, scutum with NO YELLOW, axillae with NO YELLOW, scutellum and metanotum usually with a band of dark integument running up medially, rear face of propodeum with extensive amounts of yellow but only partially yellow on either side of propodeal,  triangle yellow on mesepisturnum runs from the anterior edge and extends as a band nearly to the metepisturnum, yellow dot present on mound on mesepisturnm below tegula - Bands of yellow on T2-4 NARROW, narrower than the band of dark integument lining the rim - Sternites with less extensive yellow, S6 and at times S5 all dark - Mostly Eastern and Central Plains


      Nomada parva - among the smallest of Nomada and often mixed up with other small species (often traditionally called N. sayi and N. illinoensis).

      Males

      N. parva vs Other small species with thin long white tibial setae

      N. parva - Usually the smallest species in any region, but there is overlap with other species - Hind tibia with a THIN YELLOW BORDER OR LINE running down the rear edge,  this mark is sometimes broken or interrupted in the center of the tibia but usually is complete, noticeably different from the orangish brown background of the segment - Markings on the tergites light yellow and the borders of those markings are often relatively indistinct, almost always only occurring only laterally on T2-T4, T5 may have latitudinally extended lateral marks which, in some specimens, may become a complete line across the segment, T6 almost always with a large yellow marking across the segment, bases of T3-5 with noticeable lateral band of darkened integument , not completely black, but dark and with the edges blending indistinctly into the normal red-orange integument, T2 does not have this dark area, other species USUALLY do not have this character, but some do - Scutum and propodeum all black - Scuttellum black but at times with two red spots, these dots often minute - Usually only has a small patch of pale yellow on the lower anterior face of the mesepisturnum

      Others -  Most other species are at least slightly larger, but there is enough overlap that size alone cannot be used - As far as we know, no other species have the yellow marking on the hind tibiae, the tibia being uniformly colored an orangish-yellow-brown - Most, but not all, other species also do not have the darkened integument on the tergites - There is also a tendency for the antennal segments of other species to be slightly longer, again, not a trustworthy

      Females

      N. Parva vs Other small species with thin long white tibial setae

      N. parva - Usually the smallest species in any area, but with some overlap and thus size cannot be used alone - T2 and T3 with small pale yellow  circular marks on the far lateral sides - Tergites shiny and without any discernible pitting - T4 with a complete latitudinal BASAL DARK BAND, this band not completely black but as dark as the dark marks found on the lateral edges of the base of T1 -  The dark black-brown area at the base of T1 is usually limited to lateral sides rather than completely across the base

      Others - Most other species are, in direct comparison, at least slightly larger, but there is enough overlap that size alone cannot be used - Other species ALMOST always have relatively larger spots on the lateral sides of T2 and 3 and these often occur on T4 and, in particular, T5, these marks are also more sharply defined and of a brighter yellow color -  SOME species clearly have clear pitting in the basal area of T2 and elsewhere on the abdomen but many do not, or the pitting is indistinct, and thus ambiguous  - In most individuals the base integument coloration of T4 is similar to other tergites and does not have an area of darkened integument - The base of T1 is a darker black-brown and this dark mark goes completely across the base    


      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      "But I don't want to go among mad people," Alice remarked.
      "Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat: "we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad."
      "How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
      "You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here."
      (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Chapter 6)



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