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RE: [beemonitoring] Effectiveness of non-Apid pollinators

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  • Greenstone, Matt
    See also Lundgren JG (2009) Relationships of natural enemies and non-prey foods. Springer. There are some little-known and forgotten instances of pollinivory
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 1, 2010
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      See also Lundgren JG (2009) Relationships of natural enemies and non-prey foods. Springer.

       

      There are some little-known and forgotten instances of pollinivory and nectarivory cited, some in detail, and many of which undoubtedly result in pollination.

       

      Matt G

       


      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jack Neff
      Sent: Saturday, October 30, 2010 11:05 AM
      To: Eugene J. Scarpulla; Bee United
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Effectiveness of non-Apid pollinators

       

       

      That 88%  of the worlds flora is visited by beetles is quite plausible.  That beetles are the primary pollinators of 88% of the worlds flora is preposterous.  Academic rigor is not one of the strong points of Nabhams and Buchmann plea for pollinator conservation.

       

      best

       

      Jack
       

      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin , TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219

       

       


      From: Eugene J. Scarpulla <ejscarp@...>
      To: B! ee United <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Fri, October 29, 2010 11:28:16 PM
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Effectiveness of non-Apid pollinators

       

      Laura,

       

      This information may be a bit dated and you may already have it, but I have just finished reading Forgotten Pollinators by Stephen L. Buchmann and Gary Paul Nabhan (Island Press, Washington, D.C., 1996, 292 pp.).  While Appendix 5 (Pollinator Classes for the World's Wild Flowering Plants) does not specifically address pollinator efficiency, it does show an interesting table of "Categories of Pollen Vectors" and "% of Total Flowering Plants (Angiosperms) Pollinated by Taxon."  I have listed them in descending order.

       

      Beetles: 88.3%

      Hymenoptera: 18.0%

      Bees: 16.6%

      Wind: 8.3%

      Butterflies/Moths: 8.0%

      Flies: 5.9%

      Water: 0.63%

      All Vertebrates: 0.51%

      Birds: 0.4%

      Thrips: 0.21%

      All Mammals: 0.1%

      Bats: 0.07%

       

      Gene Scarpulla
      Millers Island , Maryland
      Editor, The Maryland Entomologist & The Phaeton
      ejscarp@...

       

       

      ----- Original Message -----

      Sent: Friday, October 29, 2010 12:16 PM

      Subject: [beemonitoring] Effectiveness of non-Apid pollinators

       

       

      Hello all,
      I hope that this is the right forum for this question.  I am curious to see whether anyone on this list-serve has strong opinions about the effectiveness of non-Apid pollinators?

      I may be confused about this topic, but as far as I can tell... floral visitation is commonly used as a surrogate for pollination services in the literature, but it seems clear that not all floral visitors are equally efficient pollinators.  Apids seem to be touted as the most effective because a) they collect pollen for their brood and b) they have branched body hairs that stick to pollen.  Other Hymenopterans are called bees, (the Anthophila families: i.e. Colletidae, Andrenidae, Megachilidae, Halictidae, Melittidae...).  However, some members of the genus Hylaeus carry pollen internally and seem like they would be less effective as pollinators.  Similarly, non-Hymenopteran visitors, such as Syrphids, are sometimes labeled pollinators. 

      Do you know of any work that has been done to compare the efficacy of these different visitors for pollination?

      I apologize if this is not an appropriate question, but I felt that I could learn a lot by posing it to all of the experts on the list-serve.

      Thank you for your time,

      Laura Russo

      --
      PhD Candidate
      Intercollege Graduate Degree Program in Ecology
      Biology Department
      Pennsylvania State University
      University Park , PA 16802

      office: 415 Mueller Lab
      phone: 814-865-7912

       

    • Susan Waters
      Hello, I ve just read about a bioinformatics system for identifying bees called ABIS. Does anyone know where I can find this software, how to get ahold of it,
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 4, 2010
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        Hello,

        I've just read about a bioinformatics system for identifying bees
        called ABIS. Does anyone know where I can find this software, how to
        get ahold of it, and what it might cost?

        Thank you,

        Susan Waters
      • Wilson, Michael E
        Hi Susan, That reminded me of some honey bee morphometric work I have heard presentations about. I found this reference in an article. Steinhage V., Arbuckle
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 5, 2010
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          Hi Susan,
          That reminded me of some honey bee morphometric work I have heard presentations about. I found this reference in an article.

          Steinhage V., Arbuckle T., Schröder S., Cremers
          A.B., Wittmann D. (2001) ABIS: Automated
          Identification of Bee Species, German
          Programme on Biodiversity and Global Change,
          Status Report 2001, Bonn, pp. 194–195, [online]
          http://www.informatik.uni-bonn.de/projects/ABIS/
          ABIS_publications.html (accessed on 24 October
          2005).

          With the link being broken, it appears it used to link from the bottom of this page

          http://wob.iai.uni-bonn.de/Wob/de/view/class217_id1312.html#class217_id1335

          Hope that helps.
          Michael Wilson
          University of Tennessee

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Susan Waters [smwaters@...]
          Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2010 7:04 PM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [beemonitoring] ABIS system for "fingerprinting" bees

           

          Hello,

          I've just read about a bioinformatics system for identifying bees
          called ABIS. Does anyone know where I can find this software, how to
          get ahold of it, and what it might cost?

          Thank you,

          Susan Waters

        • Cane, Jim
          Susan- ABIS is (was) a sophisticated morphometric digitization and analysis system for identifying bees to species, sometimes even subspecies. It used
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 5, 2010
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            Susan- ABIS is (was) a sophisticated morphometric digitization and analysis system for identifying bees to species, sometimes even subspecies.  It used angles/lengths/ratios of wing veins and cells fit (collected authomatically in later versions) and automatically chose to fit them to one of 7 (I think) templates, once the system was “trained” on a set of knowns for the genus of interest.  When I last checked, a user-friendly front-end was not available for the software, which was University developed in Germany.  It’s performance would impress if not awe anyone, even a seasoned bee taxonomist.  Last I knew, the software team is now scattered.

             

            Yours,

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            http://www.ars.usda.gov/npa/logan/beelab

            http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=jcane

            Gardening for Native Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

             

            "The obscure takes time to see,

            but the obvious takes longer"
            Edward R. Murrow

             

          • Susan Waters
            Thanks to all for your responses! Susan
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 5, 2010
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              Thanks to all for your responses!

              Susan
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