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Re: [beemonitoring]

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  • Nick Stewart
    Hey Dave (and everyone else), I had similar difficulties w/ native pollinators in N. GA this year sampling during the apple bloom - I too was/am looking to
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 29, 2010
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      Hey Dave (and everyone else),

      I had similar difficulties w/ native pollinators in N. GA this year sampling during the apple bloom - I too was/am looking to find a new/novel/ingenious method to trap these 'nectar-crazed' Apoids (and all other pollinators) in my pans/vanes.

      My study here in North GA is looking @ the native pollinator species' diversity and abundances in a number of apple orchards using pans, vanes, malaise, and sweeping - were you not having any success w/ your colored pan-traps, or just during the bloom? I've had phenomenal successes pre- and post-bloom (up until, and including, my last Sample Day last thurs.) w/ my elevated and level, colored pans (blue, yellow, and white) - as well as my elevated, colored vanes (blue and yellow) - but I use(d) highly fluorescent (UV-reactive) spray paint. If you haven't used UV-paint, it will certainly help!

      As far as my own sampling procedures during the apple bloom, I'll undoubtedly be using quite a few add'l malaise-traps per sample plot next season, but would really be interested to know of any ideas to modify pan- or vane-traps (or another passive, sampling device targeting pollinators specifically) that have proven successful in the field!

      Thanks and good luck!

      Nick Stewart


      2010/8/29 Dave Green <Pollinator@...>
       

       

       

      I’m interested in monitoring bees in the Cucurbita fields with the bee bowl trap method. This summer I’ve used the 3.5 oz blue, yellow, and white cups and had little or no success in trapping squash bees. It looks like the bee bowls cannot successfully compete with Cucurbita flowers in attracting bees. Therefore, I thought submerging flowers in cups with soapy water would yield better results. Because of the size of the flowers, I used the bottom end of a one-gallon milk jug. The results were great. In a field with a high squash bee populations I got more than two dozen males and a couple of female squash bees in less than two hours—attached is the picture. 

      P.S. Attached you would also find a picture I got of a squash bee male loaded with pollen. Who says male bees don’t do anything? J)

       
      Great idea. Now I want to try it!   And it's a great photo of the male bee. 
       
      But it doesn't really indicate that they successfully pollinate. They spend nights in the flowers and get covered with pollen. But the pollen is stale by morning, when they go out to visit flowers. It's questionable whether it is still viable.
       
       
      Dave Green
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, August 27, 2010 9:15 AM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] [2 Attachments]

       

      Good morning, everybody:

      I’m interested in monitoring bees in the Cucurbita fields with the bee bowl trap method. This summer I’ve used the 3.5 oz blue, yellow, and white cups and had little or no success in trapping squash bees. It looks like the bee bowls cannot successfully compete with Cucurbita flowers in attracting bees. Therefore, I thought submerging flowers in cups with soapy water would yield better results. Because of the size of the flowers, I used the bottom end of a one-gallon milk jug. The results were great. In a field with a high squash bee populations I got more than two dozen males and a couple of female squash bees in less than two hours—attached is the picture. I would like to know if this method works for any of you that have Cucurbita-related projects. I’m also wondering if submerging the flowers in soapy water would work in monitoring bees for other crops. When trying this method, you should use the least amount of detergent, since high concentrations would make flowers to lose their colors very fast. Please let me know what results you get or if you have any thoughts on how to better monitor squash bees through passive methods.

      Thank you,

      Alex

      P.S. Attached you would also find a picture I got of a squash bee male loaded with pollen. Who says male bees don’t do anything? J)

      Alex Surcic─â, Ag. Eng. (MS)

      Pennsylvania State University – Coop. Ext.

      181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 17202

      Phone: (717) 263-9226; Fax: (717) 263-9228; Email: Alex.Surcica@...


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