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Height-adjustable Bee Bowl Traps

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  • Alex Surcica
    Hello everybody, I m in the middle of a research project through which I monitor the bee populations on several farms located in the south-central PA. Last
    Message 1 of 2 , May 13, 2010
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      Hello everybody,

       

      I’m in the middle of a research project through which I monitor the bee populations on several farms located in the south-central PA. Last year, on several occasions I had high bowl casualties, mostly resulted from vehicle run over. In one instance I had more than 50% of the bee bowl traps run over—in part due to little communication and cooperation. One solution to mitigate this is to set the bowls in areas with less foot or vehicle traffic, which unfortunately are usually covered with vegetation. And while in the Spring the vegetation is relatively short and sparse, as the season progresses the bowls will be less visible for both bees and researchers. That said, after consulting with Sam, I came up with a relatively cheap and easy-to-install contraption that allows one to set bowls at whatever height level the vegetation might be. For the PowerPoint presentation, follow http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/height-adjustable-bee-bowltraps. Let me know if you have questions or suggestions.

       

      Thank you,

      Alex

       

      Slide1.JPG

      Slide2.JPGSlide3.JPGSlide4.JPGSlide5.JPGSlide6.JPGSlide7.JPGSlide8.JPGSlide9.JPGSlide10.JPG

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      Alex Surcică, Ag. Eng. (MS)

      Pennsylvania State University – Coop. Ext.

      181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 17202

      Phone: (717) 263-9226; Fax: (717) 263-9228; Email: Alex.Surcica@...

       

       

    • Zak Gezon
      Hello Everyone, I am catching bees in a seasonal marsh in Costa Rica. I had to come up with something similar to Alex to solve a slightly different problem.
      Message 2 of 2 , May 13, 2010
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        Hello Everyone,

        I am catching bees in a seasonal marsh in Costa Rica. I had to come up
        with something similar to Alex to solve a slightly different problem.
        When I started sampling the marsh was bone dry, but before long the
        water level started to rise, so I made PVC platforms for the bee bowls
        as you can see in the attached photos. The platform itself is made of
        fine mesh so that if a sudden rain overflows the bowls anything caught
        up until that point will be caught in the mesh. When the marsh water
        level is really low (and therefore the platform is high above the
        water surface) the wind can whip the platforms a bit, which is a
        problem, so I have been thinking about drilling the T joint all the
        way through so the platform would slide down the PVC pole, and adding
        a wingnut to the platform so that the height would be easily
        adjustable. I added velcro to the platform mesh and to the bottom of
        the bee bowls to ensure I don't loose and bowls due to wind. One
        problem I have had is that sometimes birds land on the platforms and
        slosh all the soapy water out. I don't have a solution to that
        problem yet, but I have only seen it happen twice and I don't think it
        has been a major issue.

        In any case, the platforms were pretty simple to make, are very easy
        to transport, are (hopefully) durable and didn't cost an arm and a
        leg.

        I hope this is useful, I would love to hear suggestions and feedback.

        Take it easy, happy bee catching,

        Zak

        On 5/13/10, Alex Surcica <aps15@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello everybody,
        >
        >
        >
        > I'm in the middle of a research project through which I monitor the bee
        > populations on several farms located in the south-central PA. Last year, on
        > several occasions I had high bowl casualties, mostly resulted from vehicle
        > run over. In one instance I had more than 50% of the bee bowl traps run
        > over--in part due to little communication and cooperation. One solution to
        > mitigate this is to set the bowls in areas with less foot or vehicle
        > traffic, which unfortunately are usually covered with vegetation. And while
        > in the Spring the vegetation is relatively short and sparse, as the season
        > progresses the bowls will be less visible for both bees and researchers.
        > That said, after consulting with Sam, I came up with a relatively cheap and
        > easy-to-install contraption that allows one to set bowls at whatever height
        > level the vegetation might be. For the PowerPoint presentation, follow
        > http://www.slideshare.net/sdroege/height-adjustable-bee-bowltraps. Let me
        > know if you have questions or suggestions.
        >
        >
        >
        > Thank you,
        >
        > Alex
        >
        >
        >
        > [image: Slide1.JPG]
        >
        > [image: Slide2.JPG][image: Slide3.JPG][image: Slide4.JPG][image:
        > Slide5.JPG][image: Slide6.JPG][image: Slide7.JPG][image: Slide8.JPG][image:
        > Slide9.JPG][image: Slide10.JPG]
        >
        > [image: Slide11.JPG]
        >
        >
        > Alex Surcică, Ag. Eng. (MS)
        >
        > Pennsylvania State University - Coop. Ext.
        >
        > 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 17202
        >
        > Phone: (717) 263-9226; Fax: (717) 263-9228; Email: Alex.Surcica@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        Zak Gezon
        PhD Student
        Biological Sciences Dept.
        Dartmouth College
        54 N. College St.
        Hanover, NH 03755
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