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BIML updates - Lasioglossum, Megachile, Melitoma, Colletes, Triepeolus, Melissodes, Andrena

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  • Sam Droege
    USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory Update New State Records Lasioglossum reticulatum ? Lindsey Fenner from Savannah River Plant Melitoma
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 16, 2010
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      USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory Update


      New State Records

      Lasioglossum reticulatum – Lindsey Fenner from Savannah River Plant
      Melitoma taurea – Expanding its range northward into Pennsylvania collected by Alex Surcica near Chambersburg
      Triepeolus atlanticus – Lindsey Fenner from Savannah River Plant

      Colletes Guide Updates

      Male - C. brimleyi vs C. distinctus

      C. brimleyi - Malar space about half to two-thirds as long as the width of the base of the mandibles - Hairs basad of the white apical hair band on T3 are dark colored - The long plumose hairs that line the rim of S3 are relatively uniform in height varying little across the rim except decreasing somewhat in the center - Pits on T2 mostly not touching

      C. distinctus - Malar space as long or a bit longer than the width of the base of the mandibles - Hairs basad of the white apical hair band on T3 are light colored - The long plumose hairs that line the rim of S3 vary DRAMATICALLY in height across the rim, increasing from the edges to a point and then decreasing to a minute, to near absent, size in the center, thus the overall pattern looks like two large lateral triangles of hair emerging from the rim - Pits on T2 mostly touching

      Melissodes Guide Updates - Mike Arduser send a note (and specimens) that M. tuckeri had been recorded from IL and thus we now include it in the guide.

      Female - M. coloradensis, M. tuckeri, M. vernoniae

      M. coloradensis - UNIQUE in that the wings are distinctly and unmistakably DARK OR INFUSCATED - The wide depressed rim of T2 is extensively, densely, and unmistakably invaded in the central portion by pitting, at In direct comparison, a  much LARGER bee

      M. tuckeri - Wings clear, without any coloration - The wide depressed rim of T2 is extensively, densely, and unmistakably invaded in the central portion by pitting - T4 with a distinct white, latitudinal hair band behind which, or basally, is a band of black hairs that is clearly visible even when T3 overlaps T4 extensively

      M. vernoniae - Wings clear, without any coloration - The wide depressed rim of T2 is essentially WITHOUT PITS, at most there are a few obscure, difficult to see pits on the far sides - The central portion of T4 almost entirely covered with white hairs with black hairs present only scattered along the very basal edge and therefore often covered by the rim of T3 and not visible
             

      Andrena Guide Updates

      Female - A. asteris and A. placata vs A. duplicata

      A. asteris and A. placata - Mesepisturnum unpitted - Scopal hairs so dense as to completely hide the tibial integument from view - S2-4 in addition to the long hairs along the rim, with short but clearly visible hairs throughout the segment

      A. duplicata - Mesepisturnum with distinct pits - Integument clearly visible beneath the scopal hairs on hind tibia - Hairs on S2-4 almost entirely restricted to scattered long hairs along the rim - In comparison, clypeus somewhat flattened in the center, and unpitted center line of clypeus wider

      Megachile Guide Updates

      Female - M. melanophaea, M. mucida, M. gemula

      M. gemula - The last tooth or what is really just the rearmost portion of the inner edge of the mandible between the corner and the last sinus or gap is broadly truncate or flattened, not toothlike at all, in distance almost as wide as that of the sinus preceding it - Most of T2 with pale hairs, but dark brown hairs usually line the rim - Hairs on the gena or cheek nearest the mandible distinctly pale and there are some pale hairs lining the outside edges of the front coxae - Generally northern and Appalachian in distribution

      M. melanophaea - The last or rearmost tooth of the mandible comes to a rounded point, but is definitely not flattened or truncate - T2 hair entirely pale - Hairs on the cheek or gena and on the front coxae entirely dark brown - Unlike the other two species this species almost always has bright orange hairs present on S2-5, but note that in some individuals these hairs are restricted and in others they may be entirely dark like the other species - Northern in distribution.

      M. mucida - The last or rearmost tooth of the mandible comes to a rounded point, but is definitely not flattened or truncate - Most of T2 with pale hairs, but dark hairs usually line the rim and usually expand laterally for for wider patches of dark brown hairs - Hairs on the cheek or gena and on the front coxae entirely dark brown - Southern in distribution

      Male - M. gemula, M. melanophaea, M. mucida

      M. gemula - T7, which is a small segment and only made visible by turning the specimen upside down, has no projecting central spine, but there may be some small bumps present - T6 with small triangular angles projecting from the rim just on either side of the central notch, note that this is the true rim of T6 do not mistake the very prominent flange that sits above it and hides it, you will have to turn the specimen over to see it - Front basitarsi almost entirely dark brown to black, there may be some yellow along the edge - Generally northern and Appalachian in distribution

      M. melanophaea - T7, which is a small segment and only made visible by turning the specimen upside down, has a prominent and clearly projecting central spine - T6 with very long, almost spine-like projecting finger like lobes projecting from the rim just on either side of the central notch, note that this is the true rim of T6 do not mistake the very prominent flange that sits above it and hides it, you will have to turn the specimen over to see it - Front basitarsi almost entirely yellow - Northern in distribution

      M. mucida - T7, which is a small segment and only made visible by turning the specimen upside down, has a raised broad, blunt, triangular mound projecting from the center - T6 with small triangular angles projecting from the rim just on either side of the central notch, note that this is the true rim of T6 do not mistake the very prominent flange that sits above it and hides it, you will have to turn the specimen over to see it - Front basitarsi largely yellow - Southern in distribution

      Note on Andrena duplicata in the Smokies

      Adriean Mayor, curator at Great Smokies National Park send in the following regarding some recent collections of the rarely seen A. duplicate:

      “An interesting sidebar with regard to the Helianthus angustifolius in Cades
      Cove is that this is apparently a relict population of a coastal plain
      species. I did notice that LaBerge did have a few additional records for A.
      duplicata, and mentions several species of Helianthus as floral sources. It
      was collected at the same time as other Fall species; A. accepta, A.
      aliciae, and A. simplex. “

      sam

                                                   
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      Two Views on the Same Subject

      Hui Tzu said to Chuang Tzu:  "I have a big stinktree in my garden.   The trunk is so bent and knotty that nobody can get a good straight plank out of it.
      The branches are so crooked you can't cut them up in any way that makes sense.  There it stands beside the road and no carpenter will even look at it.  
      Such is your teaching, Chuang - big and useless."
      Chuang Tzu replied: "Have you ever watched the wildcat crouching, watching its prey?   This way it leaps, and that way,
      high and low, and at last - it lands in the trap.  Have you ever seen the yak?   It is great as a thundercloud, standing in his might.
      Big?  Sure.  But, he can't catch mice!  So for your big tree.  No use?   Then plant it in the wasteland - in emptiness.  Walk idly around it and rest under
      it's shadow.  No axe or saw prepares its end.  No one will ever cut it down.   Useless?  You should worry!.
      -  Chuang Tzu, The Useless Tree, circa 200 B.C..  


      If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down?
      We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.
            -   Jack Handey

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