Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Adobe/Bank nesting bees and building nests for such

Expand Messages
  • Sam Droege
    All: Today, Shelley Small passed on the following link regarding Insect Walls. These essentially being elaborate and artistic structures for hole nesting
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 14 10:21 AM
    • 0 Attachment

      All:

      Today, Shelley Small passed on the following link regarding "Insect Walls."  These essentially being elaborate and artistic structures for hole nesting species.

      http://greayer.com/studiog/?p=4529

      Very nicely done and some neat designs for Nature Centers to contemplate.

      I e-spoke to the author, Rochelle Greayer, about the fact that some species readily nest in the walls made of adobe or earthen plasters.  In my strawbale/adobe house house I have Anthophora abrupta (hundreds), Anthophora plumipes (introduced and unfortunately increasing), Ptilothrix bombiformis (small numbers), Melitoma taurea (small numbers), and numerous Osmia, Megachile, Chrysidid, micro-hymenoptera hangers on nesting.  

      She would be interested in putting up a bit more about bees that live in adobe structures, earthen walls, or, better yet, structures of earth that people have made for these species.  So, if you have any examples, stories, or observations from around the world please share (you can post to me or to the list...I think it is of general enough interest that it would be good to have archived).

      Thanks, as always.

      sam

                                                     
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

      I rose from marsh mud

      I rose from marsh mud,
      algae, equisetum, willows,
      sweet green, noisy
      birds and frogs


      to see her wed in the rich
      rich silence of the church,
      the little white slave-girl
      in her diamond fronds.


      In aisle and arch
      the satin secret collects.
      United for life to serve
      silver. Possessed.


            -Lorine Niedecker





      P Bees are not optional.
    • Eric Mader
      Interesting topic, Sam! I was talking with Matthew Shepherd here in the office and we had one thought to add to this discussion. What do folks think is the
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 15 12:07 PM
      • 0 Attachment

        Interesting topic, Sam!

         

        I was talking with Matthew Shepherd here in the office and we had one thought to add to this discussion.

         

        What do folks think is the potential for these structures to become a population sink in their local landscape as they age and potentially become infested with chalkbrood spores and pollen mites?

         

        I know from my days managing alfalfa leafcutter bees that parasites and diseases build up incredibly fast any time nesting substrates are repeatedly re-used by solitary bees.

         

        On the one hand I think a certain level of pathogens and nest parasitism can be interesting from an educational standpoint, and can really engage people in the complexities of bee life. On the other hand, I have seen old nest blocks that are so contaminated that no new eggs deposited in them survive. Such a scenario seems likely to discourage rather than engage the general public if these types of walls are on formal display.

         

        For large scale leafcutter and mason beekeeping most people have moved to loose-cell management or elaborate nest phase out systems to maintain bee health. With fixed substrates, arranged in these beautiful and artistic configurations, that seems like a challenge.

         

        Anyone have thoughts on this?

         

        Cheers!

         

        -Eric



        On Wed, Apr 14, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Sam Droege <sdroege@...> wrote:
         


        All:

        Today, Shelley Small passed on the following link regarding "Insect Walls."  These essentially being elaborate and artistic structures for hole nesting species.

        http://greayer.com/studiog/?p=4529

        Very nicely done and some neat designs for Nature Centers to contemplate.

        I e-spoke to the author, Rochelle Greayer, about the fact that some species readily nest in the walls made of adobe or earthen plasters.  In my strawbale/adobe house house I have Anthophora abrupta (hundreds), Anthophora plumipes (introduced and unfortunately increasing), Ptilothrix bombiformis (small numbers), Melitoma taurea (small numbers), and numerous Osmia, Megachile, Chrysidid, micro-hymenoptera hangers on nesting.  

        She would be interested in putting up a bit more about bees that live in adobe structures, earthen walls, or, better yet, structures of earth that people have made for these species.  So, if you have any examples, stories, or observations from around the world please share (you can post to me or to the list...I think it is of general enough interest that it would be good to have archived).

        Thanks, as always.

        sam


                                                       
        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

        I rose from marsh mud

        I rose from marsh mud,
        algae, equisetum, willows,
        sweet green, noisy
        birds and frogs


        to see her wed in the rich
        rich silence of the church,
        the little white slave-girl
        in her diamond fronds.


        In aisle and arch
        the satin secret collects.
        United for life to serve
        silver. Possessed.


              -Lorine Niedecker





        P Bees are not optional.



        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        Eric Mader
        National Pollinator Outreach Coordinator
        The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
        Tel: 503-232-6639 Fax: 503-233-6794
        Email: eric@...
        Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society

        Assistant Professor of Extension
        University of Minnesota - Department of Entomology
        Email: made0002@...

        The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. Our Pollinator Conservation Program works to support the sustainability and profitability of farms while protecting pollinator insects. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

        Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:
        http://www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Sam Droege
        Hi Eric: Good point. It could be an issue, but it may vary by the species groups. For example, Anthophora abrupta nests in naturally large aggregations, thus
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 15 12:32 PM
        • 0 Attachment

          Hi Eric:

          Good point.  It could be an issue, but it may vary by the species groups.

          For example, Anthophora abrupta nests in naturally large aggregations, thus they must have some sort of mechanism to fend off parasites and other problems that come with communal living (perhaps they have new tunnels each year?).  However, nobody seems to manage for this species (though I could see the possibilities of doing so).  On the other hand Megachile and Osmia under most circumstances (but perhaps there are exceptions) are not normally aggregating species...thus the impacts on the populations of living at artificially high densities could be great and you have pointed out the problems that commercial folks have.  

          I would imagine that there are others on the list who can speak to this in more detail than I can.

          Vince Tepedino told me about some of Frank Parker's early work in Egypt and John Ascher told me of Jerry Rozen's work there too with S.M. Kamel on large aggregations of bees nesting in Egyptian adobe structures.  Check out:

          http://www.pollinatorparadise.com/Egypt.htm

          sam

                                                         
          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


          Franklin Hyde, Who caroused in the Dirt and was corrected by His Uncle

          His Uncle came on Franklin Hyde
          Carousing in the Dirt.
          He Shook him hard from Side to Side
          And
          Hit him till it Hurt,


          Exclaiming, with a Final Thud,
          'Take that! Abandoned Boy!
          For Playing with Disgusting Mud
          As though it were a Toy!'


          Moral
          From Franklin Hyde's adventure, learn
          To pass your Leisure Time
          In Cleanly Merriment, and turn
          From Mud and Ooze and Slime
          And every form of Nastiness-
          But, on the other Hand,
          Children in ordinary Dress
          May always play with Sand.


              - Hilaire Belloc
          P Bees are not optional.


          From:Eric Mader <eric@...>
          To:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Cc:Sam Droege <sdroege@...>, rochellegreayer@...
          Date:04/15/2010 03:08 PM
          Subject:Re: [beemonitoring] Adobe/Bank nesting bees and building nests for         such
          Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com





           

          Interesting topic, Sam!

           

          I was talking with Matthew Shepherd here in the office and we had one thought to add to this discussion.

           

          What do folks think is the potential for these structures to become a population sink in their local landscape as they age and potentially become infested with chalkbrood spores and pollen mites?

           

          I know from my days managing alfalfa leafcutter bees that parasites and diseases build up incredibly fast any time nesting substrates are repeatedly re-used by solitary bees.

           

          On the one hand I think a certain level of pathogens and nest parasitism can be interesting from an educational standpoint, and can really engage people in the complexities of bee life. On the other hand, I have seen old nest blocks that are so contaminated that no new eggs deposited in them survive. Such a scenario seems likely to discourage rather than engage the general public if these types of walls are on formal display.

           

          For large scale leafcutter and mason beekeeping most people have moved to loose-cell management or elaborate nest phase out systems to maintain bee health. With fixed substrates, arranged in these beautiful and artistic configurations, that seems like a challenge.

           

          Anyone have thoughts on this?

           

          Cheers!

           

          -Eric



          On Wed, Apr 14, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Sam Droege <sdroege@...> wrote:
           


          All:


          Today, Shelley Small passed on the following link regarding "Insect Walls."  These essentially being elaborate and artistic structures for hole nesting species.


          http://greayer.com/studiog/?p=4529

          Very nicely done and some neat designs for Nature Centers to contemplate.


          I e-spoke to the author, Rochelle Greayer, about the fact that some species readily nest in the walls made of adobe or earthen plasters.  In my strawbale/adobe house house I have Anthophora abrupta (hundreds), Anthophora plumipes (introduced and unfortunately increasing), Ptilothrix bombiformis (small numbers), Melitoma taurea (small numbers), and numerous Osmia, Megachile, Chrysidid, micro-hymenoptera hangers on nesting.  


          She would be interested in putting up a bit more about bees that live in adobe structures, earthen walls, or, better yet, structures of earth that people have made for these species.  So, if you have any examples, stories, or observations from around the world please share (you can post to me or to the list...I think it is of general enough interest that it would be good to have archived).


          Thanks, as always.


          sam


                                                         
          Sam Droege  
          sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705

          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

          I rose from marsh mud


          I rose from marsh mud,
          algae, equisetum, willows,
          sweet green, noisy
          birds and frogs


          to see her wed in the rich
          rich silence of the church,
          the little white slave-girl
          in her diamond fronds.


          In aisle and arch
          the satin secret collects.
          United for life to serve
          silver. Possessed.


                -Lorine Niedecker






          P
          Bees are not optional.



          --
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
          Eric Mader
          National Pollinator Outreach Coordinator
          The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
          Tel: 503-232-6639 Fax: 503-233-6794
          Email:
          eric@...
          Skype: eric_mader_xerces_society

          Assistant Professor of Extension
          University of Minnesota - Department of Entomology
          Email:
          made0002@...

          The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. Our Pollinator Conservation Program works to support the sustainability and profitability of farms while protecting pollinator insects. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit
          www.xerces.org.

          Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:

          http://www.xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center/
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------



        • Laurence Packer
          Howdy While I know of no long term study of such walls, ground-nesting bees have been known to nest at great density in the same patch of dirt for maybe a
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 15 1:05 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Howdy

            While I know of no long term study of such walls, ground-nesting bees have been known to nest at great density in the same patch of dirt for maybe a century.  Though even for them population crashes, apparently due to the build up of macro-organisms such as cuckoo bees and velvet ants, have been recorded.  The best paper I am aware of is:

            Knerer, Gerd. “Periodizität und Strategie der Schmarotzer einer
            sozialen Schmalbiene, Evylaeus malachurus (K.) (Apoidea: Halictidae).”
            Zoologische Anzeiger 190 (1973): 41–63.

            but is in German.  I had someone read it into a tape recorder for me in 1976, but the technology wouldn't work any more even if I hadn't lost the tape!

            cheers

            laurence


            From: Sam Droege <sdroege@...>
            To: Eric Mader <eric@...>
            Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com; rochellegreayer@...
            Sent: Thu, April 15, 2010 3:32:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Adobe/Bank nesting bees and building nests for such

             


            Hi Eric:

            Good point.  It could be an issue, but it may vary by the species groups.

            For example, Anthophora abrupta nests in naturally large aggregations, thus they must have some sort of mechanism to fend off parasites and other problems that come with communal living (perhaps they have new tunnels each year?).  However, nobody seems to manage for this species (though I could see the possibilities of doing so).  On the other hand Megachile and Osmia under most circumstances (but perhaps there are exceptions) are not normally aggregating species...thus the impacts on the populations of living at artificially high densities could be great and you have pointed out the problems that commercial folks have.  

            I would imagine that there are others on the list who can speak to this in more detail than I can.

            Vince Tepedino told me about some of Frank Parker's early work in Egypt and John Ascher told me of Jerry Rozen's work there too with S.M. Kamel on large aggregations of bees nesting in Egyptian adobe structures.  Check out:

            http://www.pollinat orparadise. com/Egypt. htm

            sam

                                                           
            Sam Droege  sdroege@usgs. gov                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
            Http://www.pwrc. usgs.gov



            Franklin Hyde, Who caroused in the Dirt and was corrected by His Uncle

            His Uncle came on Franklin Hyde
            Carousing in the Dirt.
            He Shook him hard from Side to Side
            And
            Hit him till it Hurt,


            Exclaiming, with a Final Thud,
            'Take that! Abandoned Boy!
            For Playing with Disgusting Mud
            As though it were a Toy!'


            Moral
            From Franklin Hyde's adventure, learn
            To pass your Leisure Time
            In Cleanly Merriment, and turn
            From Mud and Ooze and Slime
            And every form of Nastiness-
            But, on the other Hand,
            Children in ordinary Dress
            May always play with Sand.


                - Hilaire Belloc
            P Bees are not optional.


            From:Eric Mader <eric@xerces. org>
            To:beemonitoring@ yahoogroups. com
            Cc:Sam Droege <sdroege@usgs. gov>, rochellegreayer@ gmail.com
            Date:04/15/2010 03:08 PM
            Subject:Re: [beemonitoring] Adobe/Bank nesting bees and building nests for         such
            Sent by:beemonitoring@ yahoogroups. com





             

            Interesting topic, Sam!

             

            I was talking with Matthew Shepherd here in the office and we had one thought to add to this discussion.

             

            What do folks think is the potential for these structures to become a population sink in their local landscape as they age and potentially become infested with chalkbrood spores and pollen mites?

             

            I know from my days managing alfalfa leafcutter bees that parasites and diseases build up incredibly fast any time nesting substrates are repeatedly re-used by solitary bees.

             

            On the one hand I think a certain level of pathogens and nest parasitism can be interesting from an educational standpoint, and can really engage people in the complexities of bee life. On the other hand, I have seen old nest blocks that are so contaminated that no new eggs deposited in them survive. Such a scenario seems likely to discourage rather than engage the general public if these types of walls are on formal display.

             

            For large scale leafcutter and mason beekeeping most people have moved to loose-cell management or elaborate nest phase out systems to maintain bee health. With fixed substrates, arranged in these beautiful and artistic configurations, that seems like a challenge.

             

            Anyone have thoughts on this?

             

            Cheers!

             

            -Eric



            On Wed, Apr 14, 2010 at 10:21 AM, Sam Droege <sdroege@usgs. gov> wrote:
             


            All:


            Today, Shelley Small passed on the following link regarding "Insect Walls."  These essentially being elaborate and artistic structures for hole nesting species.


            http://greayer. com/studiog/ ?p=4529

            Very nicely done and some neat designs for Nature Centers to contemplate.


            I e-spoke to the author, Rochelle Greayer, about the fact that some species readily nest in the walls made of adobe or earthen plasters.  In my strawbale/adobe house house I have Anthophora abrupta (hundreds), Anthophora plumipes (introduced and unfortunately increasing), Ptilothrix bombiformis (small numbers), Melitoma taurea (small numbers), and numerous Osmia, Megachile, Chrysidid, micro-hymenoptera hangers on nesting.  


            She would be interested in putting up a bit more about bees that live in adobe structures, earthen walls, or, better yet, structures of earth that people have made for these species.  So, if you have any examples, stories, or observations from around the world please share (you can post to me or to the list...I think it is of general enough interest that it would be good to have archived).


            Thanks, as always.


            sam


                                                           
            Sam Droege  
            sdroege@usgs. gov                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705

            Http://www.pwrc. usgs.gov

            I rose from marsh mud


            I rose from marsh mud,
            algae, equisetum, willows,
            sweet green, noisy
            birds and frogs


            to see her wed in the rich
            rich silence of the church,
            the little white slave-girl
            in her diamond fronds.


            In aisle and arch
            the satin secret collects.
            United for life to serve
            silver. Possessed.


                  -Lorine Niedecker






            P
            Bees are not optional.



            --
            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ----
            Eric Mader
            National Pollinator Outreach Coordinator
            The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
            Tel: 503-232-6639 Fax: 503-233-6794
            Email:
            eric@xerces. org
            Skype: eric_mader_xerces_ society

            Assistant Professor of Extension
            University of Minnesota - Department of Entomology
            Email:
            made0002@umn. edu

            The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. Our Pollinator Conservation Program works to support the sustainability and profitability of farms while protecting pollinator insects. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit
            www.xerces.org.

            Find all the information you need to conserve pollinator habitat at:

            http://www.xerces. org/pollinator- resource- center/
            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ----




            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • Cane, Jim
            Folks- in fact Osmia and Megachile do aggregate on occasions, but typically the ground-nesting species (or any for cavity nesters, if available holes are also
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 16 8:07 AM

            Folks- in fact Osmia and Megachile do aggregate on occasions, but typically the ground-nesting species (or any for cavity nesters, if available holes are also aggregated).  Attached is a paper reporting a case of the former. 

             

            As to longevity of nesting aggregations, the longest yet known is ½ century, with a summary in this other paper of mine on alkali bees (which rounds up both published and validated pers comm. sources).

             

            In the event that the attachments don’t post, Sam and I will work out a way for you to get them.

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            http://www.ars.usda.gov/npa/logan/beelab

            http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=jcane

            Gardening for Native Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

             

            "The obscure takes time to see,

            but the obvious takes longer"
            Edward R. Murrow

             

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.