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RE: [beemonitoring] catching bees on cactus

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  • Neil Stanley Cobb
    We designed our own pollinator vac (attached pic) for use in a number of habitats, including ones that had cacti and mesquite. We are pretty happy with it,
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 5 1:38 PM
    We designed our own pollinator vac (attached pic) for use in a number of habitats, including ones that had cacti and mesquite. We are pretty happy with it, but you still have to develop a technique. Since we made ours BioQuip came out with something comparable and reasonably priced. I am not suggesting it is better than other methods but it is one alternative.




    Neil S. Cobb, Director
    Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research
    Peterson Hall, Bldg 22, Rm 330, Box 6077
    Northern Arizona University Flagstaff, AZ 86011
    http://www.mpcer.nau.edu http://bugs.nau.edu http://www.grail.nau.edu/

    Neil.Cobb@...
    (Home Office) 928-214-6237
    (Mobile Office) 928-607-4075


    -----Original Message-----
    From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Yanega
    Sent: Monday, April 05, 2010 11:44 AM
    To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] catching bees on cactus

    Having done lots of cactus collecting, I've found two techniques that
    work well:

    (1) the test-tube method, using a vial with a diameter just slightly
    larger than the flower, but you have to be quick, and time it for
    when the bee is distracted (that is, it works mostly for females, but
    not for males).
    (2) the "jedi" method, determining the flight path of bees
    approaching or departing, and intercepting them in clear airspace
    either before or after they land. This keeps the net away from the
    plant, but requires very good reflexes and a lot of patience.

    a variant on this technique which is less reliable is the
    "misdirection" method, where you hold the net off to one side of the
    flower, and use a large object with your free hand to scare the bee
    off the flower in the desired direction - hopefully, right into the
    net. In principle, it's good, but bees don;t always do what you
    expect when you scare them.

    The good thing is that there should be only a very few species
    visiting, and it won't take many specimens to complete the list.

    Peace,
    --

    Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
    Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
    phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
    http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
    "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
    is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82


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