Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

466RE: [beemonitoring] Cliff Bees

Expand Messages
  • Jack Neff
    Oct 29, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Jennifer: Anthophora abrupta is an excellent bet for your bees since they nest in banks and their robust size and black and white/off yellow coloration can lead to their mis-identification as bumble bees. This is a rather well studied species and useful references on its biology include Beth Norden (1984), "Nesting biology of Anthophora abrupta (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae)" Journal of the Kansas Entomogical Society 57: 243-262; Phil Rau, (1929) The biology and behavior of mining bees Anthophora abrupta and Entechnia taurea, Psyche 36: 155-181; Beth Norden and Suzanne Batra (1985) "Male bees sport black mustaches for picking up parsnip perfume (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae)", Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 87: 312-322.

      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219


      --- On Wed, 10/29/08, Frye, Jennifer <jfrye@...> wrote:

      > From: Frye, Jennifer <jfrye@...>
      > Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Cliff Bees
      > To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wednesday, October 29, 2008, 9:16 AM
      > Thanks to both of you for the information! I will take your
      > advice and
      > request A Cluster of Bees. I remember seeing the
      > Anthophora colony at
      > Sam's place, but didn't make the connection that
      > these were the same
      > type of bees nesting on the sandy cliffs.
      >
      >
      >
      > Much thanks!
      >
      >
      >
      > Jen Frye
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter
      > Bernhardt
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2008 9:36 AM
      > To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Cliff Bees
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear Jennifer:
      >
      >
      >
      > I can't answer your question in full but I can give you
      > some clues. If
      > the owner referred to the insects as resembling small
      > bumblebees it's
      > very likely they are going to belong to one of many species
      > of
      > anthophorines. Some resemble smaller, chunkier versions of
      > bumblebees
      > and even have a light stripe on their abdomens.
      >
      >
      >
      > Cliff nesting bees was an interest of Tarlton Rayment, an
      > Australian
      > naturalist. He even filmed them in the 1930's and
      > released a short
      > called, "The Cliff Dwellers." I think the
      > footage has been lost. Have
      > your library pick up a loan of his 1935 book, "A
      > Cluster of Bees."
      > Rayment did his own pen and ink illustrations.
      >
      >
      >
      > Sincerely, Peter Bernhardt
      >
      > On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 3:38 PM, Frye, Jennifer
      > <jfrye@...
      > <mailto:jfrye@...> > wrote:
      >
      > Hi everyone,
      >
      >
      >
      > I had a question I thought perhaps one or more of you could
      > answer.
      > Twice in the last year, I have been asked my colleagues
      > about bees
      > nesting in cliffs. Both sightings were in Maryland, one
      > along the
      > Potomac River in Charles County and the other along the
      > Sassafras River
      > in Kent County. Both sites had sandy cliffs along the
      > beach, and bees
      > were apparently nesting in the sand on the cliff faces. At
      > one site,
      > the landowner said that the bees nesting in the cliffs
      > looked like small
      > bumblebees, and that during the summer they come down to
      > the water's
      > edge to drink(?) Any ideas on what kind of bees they might
      > be? I have
      > not actually seen them myself but am wondering if it is
      > worth a trip to
      > collect some next year.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks in advance for any information!
      >
      >
      >
      > Sincerely,
      >
      > Jen Frye
      >
      > Natural Heritage Program
    • Show all 5 messages in this topic