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Re: [beam] Re: Naming the Wild Robot [was: Diode bypass & mounting PV cells]

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  • bill bigge
    how about Feral Bot (thats what my thesaurus said:) ... From: Wilf Rigter To: Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001
      how about Feral Bot (thats what my thesaurus said:)

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Wilf Rigter <wilf.rigter@...>
      To: <beam@egroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 4:37 AM
      Subject: [beam] Re: Naming the Wild Robot [was: Diode bypass & mounting PV
      cells]


      > Hello Robert and welcome home to the list,
      >
      > I send a lengthy reply to your question on bypass diodes but it is
      > hung up in my server which is temporarily down. Probably tomorrow. As
      > far as a generic term or name for wild robots I'll put in freeroving
      > robot or freebot.
      >
      > wilf
      >
      > --- In beam@egroups.com, bnansel@n... wrote:
      > > >Hey Robert,
      > > > Glad to see you. Have you named your beastie yet? You could try
      > mounting
      > > >them on some of that IC foam stuff. Hmm. but that conducts.
      > Styrofoam?
      > > >-William
      > > >
      > >
      > > No, I haven't named it yet. I'm also still working out a good name
      > for this
      > > general class of robot. It's not exactly a BEAM machine, though it
      > will
      > > have BEAMish elements (solar power, no power switch, simple, robust
      > > construction, and I'm spending a lot of time on the aesthetics). I
      > like
      > > Tilden's idea of a "biomorph," but I'd like to be more specific than
      > that.
      > > I want to capture in the name the idea of a robotic wild animal.
      > > "Biomorph," for my money, doesn't really capture the essence of a
      > robot
      > > wild animal.
      > >
      > > This is all for my newest robot project I'm contemplating for
      > spring, a
      > > robot designed to function unattended 24/7 in one of the harshest
      > > environments I have handy: my back yard. This is something I haven't
      > seen
      > > anyone really do yet.
      > >
      > > I do want the 'bot to have an functional endurance of, say, 10K
      > hours with
      > > no maintenance. It must be designed to survive for more than a year
      > of
      > > summer heat, winter cold, high humidity, low humidity, and wind;
      > further,
      > > it must cope gracefully with grass, dandelions, a few smallish
      > stones,
      > > curious animals, rain, snow, etc. I want it to monitor, log, and
      > > occasionally respond to changes in temperature, light, touch, and
      > sound. I
      > > might also want to add a pickup coil & circuitry to detect a
      > boundary wire
      > > to keep it in my back yard.
      > >
      > > The robot will of course be solar powered, but since I want to
      > reliably be
      > > able to *find* it to check the its condition, it must be bigger than
      > a
      > > typical BEAM photovore. Otherwise it would simply disappear in the
      > grass.
      > > The 'bot itself would have a footprint somewhere between 6" and 12"
      > > square.
      > >
      > > In trying to come up with a name for this 'bot, I looked at Latin
      > and Greek
      > > roots to see if I could coin a new general term for this class of
      > machines.
      > > The root for tortoise wasn't much help, but on the way thumbing
      > through my
      > > dictionary I came across the entry "theropod," the most famous
      > example of
      > > which would be T. Rex. "Theropod" derived from Greek _ther_, wild
      > beast +
      > > New Latin -poda, -pod, meaning foot.
      > >
      > > The word "machine" derives from Latin _machina_ which in turn
      > derives from
      > > Greek _mekhane_ or _makhana_. A "wild machine" would thus be
      > something
      > > like:
      > >
      > > theromech
      > > theromek
      > > theromak
      > >
      > > Anyway, that's about as far as I've gotten (on the aesthetics side,
      > at least).
      > >
      > > -RLN
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >
      >
      >
    • sebastiaan van Vliet
      Hey great. finally some fun stuff on the list. there should be some kind of contest: name my bot and win a walking trip to a destination of your choice! I d
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001

        Hey great. finally some fun stuff on the list. there should be some kind of contest: "name my bot and win a walking trip to a destination of your choice!"

        I'd go for savabotics as the general name...



         

        >From: "bill bigge"
        >Reply-To: beam@egroups.com
        >To:
        >Subject: Re: [beam] Re: Naming the Wild Robot [was: Diode bypass & mounting PV cells]
        >Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 11:11:56 -0000
        >
        >how about Feral Bot (thats what my thesaurus said:)
        >
        >----- Original Message -----
        >From: Wilf Rigter
        >To:
        >Sent: Monday, January 01, 2001 4:37 AM
        >Subject: [beam] Re: Naming the Wild Robot [was: Diode bypass & mounting PV
        >cells]
        >
        >
        > > Hello Robert and welcome home to the list,
        > >
        > > I send a lengthy reply to your question on bypass diodes but it is
        > > hung up in my server which is temporarily down. Probably tomorrow. As
        > > far as a generic term or name for wild robots I'll put in freeroving
        > > robot or freebot.
        > >
        > > wilf
        > >
        > > --- In beam@egroups.com, bnansel@n... wrote:
        > > > >Hey Robert,
        > > > > Glad to see you. Have you named your beastie yet? You could try
        > > mounting
        > > > >them on some of that IC foam stuff. Hmm. but that conducts.
        > > Styrofoam?
        > > > >-William
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > No, I haven't named it yet. I'm also still working out a good name
        > > for this
        > > > general class of robot. It's not exactly a BEAM machine, though it
        > > will
        > > > have BEAMish elements (solar power, no power switch, simple, robust
        > > > construction, and I'm spending a lot of time on the aesthetics). I
        > > like
        > > > Tilden's idea of a "biomorph," but I'd like to be more specific than
        > > that.
        > > > I want to capture in the name the idea of a robotic wild animal.
        > > > "Biomorph," for my money, doesn't really capture the essence of a
        > > robot
        > > > wild animal.
        > > >
        > > > This is all for my newest robot project I'm contemplating for
        > > spring, a
        > > > robot designed to function unattended 24/7 in one of the harshest
        > > > environments I have handy: my back yard. This is something I haven't
        > > seen
        > > > anyone really do yet.
        > > >
        > > > I do want the 'bot to have an functional endurance of, say, 10K
        > > hours with
        > > > no maintenance. It must be designed to survive for more than a year
        > > of
        > > > summer heat, winter cold, high humidity, low humidity, and wind;
        > > further,
        > > > it must cope gracefully with grass, dandelions, a few smallish
        > > stones,
        > > > curious animals, rain, snow, etc. I want it to monitor, log, and
        > > > occasionally respond to changes in temperature, light, touch, and
        > > sound. I
        > > > might also want to add a pickup coil & circuitry to detect a
        > > boundary wire
        > > > to keep it in my back yard.
        > > >
        > > > The robot will of course be solar powered, but since I want to
        > > reliably be
        > > > able to *find* it to check the its condition, it must be bigger than
        > > a
        > > > typical BEAM photovore. Otherwise it would simply disappear in the
        > > grass.
        > > > The 'bot itself would have a footprint somewhere between 6" and 12"
        > > > square.
        > > >
        > > > In trying to come up with a name for this 'bot, I looked at Latin
        > > and Greek
        > > > roots to see if I could coin a new general term for this class of
        > > machines.
        > > > The root for tortoise wasn't much help, but on the way thumbing
        > > through my
        > > > dictionary I came across the entry "theropod," the most famous
        > > example of
        > > > which would be T. Rex. "Theropod" derived from Greek _ther_, wild
        > > beast +
        > > > New Latin -poda, -pod, meaning foot.
        > > >
        > > > The word "machine" derives from Latin _machina_ which in turn
        > > derives from
        > > > Greek _mekhane_ or _makhana_. A "wild machine" would thus be
        > > something
        > > > like:
        > > >
        > > > theromech
        > > > theromek
        > > > theromak
        > > >
        > > > Anyway, that's about as far as I've gotten (on the aesthetics side,
        > > at least).
        > > >
        > > > -RLN
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >


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      • Verne & Catherine Rambaud
        try combining bot with part of an animal name that you feel is free. Free in Gaelic is saor (broaden the s and r, the oa is pronounced like the ur like in
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001
          try combining "bot" with part of an animal name that you feel is free.
          Free in Gaelic is "saor" (broaden the s and r, the oa is pronounced like the
          ur like in curve). Gaelic is rarely spoken few people would know its
          origin, but it'd have a nice ring to it.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: bnansel@... <bnansel@...>
          To: beam@egroups.com <beam@egroups.com>
          Date: Monday, January 01, 2001 12:34 AM
          Subject: [beam] Naming the Wild Robot [was: Diode bypass & mounting PV
          cells]


          >>Hey Robert,
          >> Glad to see you. Have you named your beastie yet? You could try
          mounting
          >>them on some of that IC foam stuff. Hmm. but that conducts. Styrofoam?
          >>-William
          >>
          >
          >No, I haven't named it yet. I'm also still working out a good name for this
          >general class of robot. It's not exactly a BEAM machine, though it will
          >have BEAMish elements (solar power, no power switch, simple, robust
          >construction, and I'm spending a lot of time on the aesthetics). I like
          >Tilden's idea of a "biomorph," but I'd like to be more specific than that.
          >I want to capture in the name the idea of a robotic wild animal.
          >"Biomorph," for my money, doesn't really capture the essence of a robot
          >wild animal.
          >
          >This is all for my newest robot project I'm contemplating for spring, a
          >robot designed to function unattended 24/7 in one of the harshest
          >environments I have handy: my back yard. This is something I haven't seen
          >anyone really do yet.
          >
          >I do want the 'bot to have an functional endurance of, say, 10K hours with
          >no maintenance. It must be designed to survive for more than a year of
          >summer heat, winter cold, high humidity, low humidity, and wind; further,
          >it must cope gracefully with grass, dandelions, a few smallish stones,
          >curious animals, rain, snow, etc. I want it to monitor, log, and
          >occasionally respond to changes in temperature, light, touch, and sound. I
          >might also want to add a pickup coil & circuitry to detect a boundary wire
          >to keep it in my back yard.
          >
          >The robot will of course be solar powered, but since I want to reliably be
          >able to *find* it to check the its condition, it must be bigger than a
          >typical BEAM photovore. Otherwise it would simply disappear in the grass.
          >The 'bot itself would have a footprint somewhere between 6" and 12"
          >square.
          >
          >In trying to come up with a name for this 'bot, I looked at Latin and Greek
          >roots to see if I could coin a new general term for this class of machines.
          >The root for tortoise wasn't much help, but on the way thumbing through my
          >dictionary I came across the entry "theropod," the most famous example of
          >which would be T. Rex. "Theropod" derived from Greek _ther_, wild beast +
          >New Latin -poda, -pod, meaning foot.
          >
          >The word "machine" derives from Latin _machina_ which in turn derives from
          >Greek _mekhane_ or _makhana_. A "wild machine" would thus be something
          >like:
          >
          > theromech
          > theromek
          > theromak
          >
          >Anyway, that's about as far as I've gotten (on the aesthetics side, at
          least).
          >
          >-RLN
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          >beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
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