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Caps in Series

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  • NuLynx@aol.com
    Ok, this may show my electronics knowledge (or, should I say, lack thereof). What is the purpose of wiring capacitors in series to reduce capacitance to half?
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2000
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      Ok, this may show my electronics knowledge (or, should I say, lack
      thereof). What is the purpose of wiring capacitors in series to reduce
      capacitance to half? I ran across some older posts that speak of it.
      Why not just use a smaller cap? Wouldn't it be cheaper and take up
      less room? Along those same lines, why do quite a few designs (symets,
      for example) use 3 or 4 caps in parallel to INCREASE capacitance?
      Wouldn't it also be cheaper and take up less room to use a single,
      larger cap?

      Just wonderin
    • Daniel Grace
      Wiring them in series doubles the voltage rating. 2.5V is the normal rating for higher capacity capacitors (redundant?), but most solar engines trigger at a
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 30, 2000
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        Wiring them in series doubles the voltage rating. 2.5V
        is the normal rating for higher capacity capacitors
        (redundant?), but most solar engines trigger at a
        higher voltage...putting them in series halfs the
        voltage, but it doubles the voltage rating to 5V.

        As far as wiring them in parallel...I don't know if it
        would be cheaper or better to buy a single capacitor.
        Possibly they didn't want to go to the next highest
        level. Maybe they wanted .6F instead of 1F?

        ~Daniel

        --- NuLynx@... wrote:
        > Ok, this may show my electronics knowledge (or,
        > should I say, lack
        > thereof). What is the purpose of wiring capacitors
        > in series to reduce
        > capacitance to half? I ran across some older posts
        > that speak of it.
        > Why not just use a smaller cap? Wouldn't it be
        > cheaper and take up
        > less room? Along those same lines, why do quite a
        > few designs (symets,
        > for example) use 3 or 4 caps in parallel to INCREASE
        > capacitance?
        > Wouldn't it also be cheaper and take up less room to
        > use a single,
        > larger cap?
        >
        > Just wonderin
        >
        >
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      • NuLynx@aol.com
        Ok, thanks for the info. I thought maybe it was a just what I have on hand type of thing. I forgot about the voltage increase. That s a good thing to keep in
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 30, 2000
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          Ok, thanks for the info. I thought maybe it was a "just what I have on
          hand" type of thing. I forgot about the voltage increase. That's a
          good thing to keep in mind. It is also why I have kind of shied away
          from using the 2.5V caps.

          Personally, "cheap" comes to mind with my creations. I guess I would
          rather wait with a project and get a cheaper/smaller cap (even from
          RatShack) than to sacrifice 2 of my larger/more expensive caps to do
          the same job. I just wasn't sure if there was some advantage I was
          missing.

          I do have to admit some of the designs with multiple caps can look
          pretty cool. I guess that's where the "A" part of BEAM comes in, huh?

          Thanks agai
        • Vincent Chin
          hi, Normal caps such as 1000uf, 2200uf, 3300uf, and even those flat memory backup caps has rather high ESR[ohm](anyone know the long term?) which is considered
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2000
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            hi,
            Normal caps such as 1000uf, 2200uf, 3300uf, and
            even those flat memory backup caps has rather high
            ESR[ohm](anyone know the long term?) which is
            considered as pretty inefficient in BEAM technology.

            So to lower the internal resistance, we wire them in
            parallel.(Ohm's Law 1/R = 1/r + 1/r) This provide an
            evenly distributed weight on a trimet body and results
            in high capacitance and low ESR(internal resistance?)
            which is rather suitable for solar application in
            BEAM.

            Electrolytic caps have ESR of 20ohm to 150ohm while
            the Panasonic AL Gold series have really low internal
            resistance for e.g. 1ohm for 1F and 1.7ohm for 0.33F
            so we don't have to worry about them because as
            discussed earlier, they are pretty efficient.

            --- NuLynx@... wrote:
            > Ok, thanks for the info. I thought maybe it was a
            > "just what I have on
            > hand" type of thing. I forgot about the voltage
            > increase. That's a
            > good thing to keep in mind. It is also why I have
            > kind of shied away
            > from using the 2.5V caps.
            >
            > Personally, "cheap" comes to mind with my creations.
            > I guess I would
            > rather wait with a project and get a cheaper/smaller
            > cap (even from
            > RatShack) than to sacrifice 2 of my larger/more
            > expensive caps to do
            > the same job. I just wasn't sure if there was some
            > advantage I was
            > missing.
            >
            > I do have to admit some of the designs with multiple
            > caps can look
            > pretty cool. I guess that's where the "A" part of
            > BEAM comes in, huh?
            >
            > Thanks agai


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          • Larry
            Darn it! All I have are a bunch of .47 s, I need some .22 s (2 - .47 s in series = .235, close enough!). Same thought applies if you need a higher voltage
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 30, 2001
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              Darn it! All I have are a bunch of .47's, I need some .22's (2 - .47's
              in series = .235, close enough!). Same thought applies if you need a higher
              voltage rating. In series = greater voltage rating.
              Symets, balance and symmetry .


              Larry

              That is just my opinion.
              But, I could be wrong!

              (Quote from Dennis Miller)

              '67 P 1800 S
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <NuLynx@...>
              To: <beam@egroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 5:51 PM
              Subject: [beam] Caps in Series


              > Ok, this may show my electronics knowledge (or, should I say, lack
              > thereof). What is the purpose of wiring capacitors in series to reduce
              > capacitance to half? I ran across some older posts that speak of it.
              > Why not just use a smaller cap? Wouldn't it be cheaper and take up
              > less room? Along those same lines, why do quite a few designs (symets,
              > for example) use 3 or 4 caps in parallel to INCREASE capacitance?
              > Wouldn't it also be cheaper and take up less room to use a single,
              > larger cap?
              >
              > Just wonderin
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
            • Larry
              The point I was trying to make, is use what you have on hand. Cheating is allowed, as is doing weird unusual things. Larry That is just my opinion. But, I
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 30, 2001
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                The point I was trying to make, is use what you have on hand. Cheating
                is allowed, as is doing weird unusual things.


                Larry

                That is just my opinion.
                But, I could be wrong!

                (Quote from Dennis Miller)

                '67 P 1800 S
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Daniel Grace" <lifebytes_98@...>
                To: <beam@egroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 6:40 PM
                Subject: Re: [beam] Caps in Series


                > Wiring them in series doubles the voltage rating. 2.5V
                > is the normal rating for higher capacity capacitors
                > (redundant?), but most solar engines trigger at a
                > higher voltage...putting them in series halfs the
                > voltage, but it doubles the voltage rating to 5V.
                >
                > As far as wiring them in parallel...I don't know if it
                > would be cheaper or better to buy a single capacitor.
                > Possibly they didn't want to go to the next highest
                > level. Maybe they wanted .6F instead of 1F?
                >
                > ~Daniel
                >
                > --- NuLynx@... wrote:
                > > Ok, this may show my electronics knowledge (or,
                > > should I say, lack
                > > thereof). What is the purpose of wiring capacitors
                > > in series to reduce
                > > capacitance to half? I ran across some older posts
                > > that speak of it.
                > > Why not just use a smaller cap? Wouldn't it be
                > > cheaper and take up
                > > less room? Along those same lines, why do quite a
                > > few designs (symets,
                > > for example) use 3 or 4 caps in parallel to INCREASE
                > > capacitance?
                > > Wouldn't it also be cheaper and take up less room to
                > > use a single,
                > > larger cap?
                > >
                > > Just wonderin
                > >
                > >
                > > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > =====
                > ICQ # 39402143
                > http://www.negativeview.com
                > [non-beam]
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Yahoo! Shopping - Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products.
                > http://shopping.yahoo.com/
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                >
                >
                >
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