Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hello?

Expand Messages
  • connor_ramsey@ymail.com
    Hello? anyone out there? I m working on a light seeking symet too. Shouldn t all symets be light seeking? Anyway, It s gonna be called Bisymet , due to the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 10, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello? anyone out there?

      I'm working on a light seeking symet too. Shouldn't all symets be light seeking? Anyway, It's gonna be called "Bisymet", due to the fact that it's longer than it is wide, and because it can move in two directions.
      It doesn't ACTUALLY have any dedicated light sensors, but it uses a zener diode to measure the average voltage output of the solar panel, and if the voltage is too low, the transistor coupling switches state, reversing the motor's direction on the next solar engine cycle. So basically, Bisymet will keep moving forward until the light gets too dim, indicating it has moved away from the light source, it reverses its direction until it migrates back into it's "comfort zone". Otherwise, Bisymet will simply bump its way out of any encounter with an obstacle, like a normal symet. Although I intend to off-center the motor shaft to create a more interesting exploration behavior. Again I think that should be standard among symets.

      Concerning that FLED walker i mentioned earlier, the rear FLEDs can simply double as light sensors to bias the rear motor toward light.
      The only ways I can figure to fit any obstacle avoidance are a) use the light sensing FLEDs to detect when an object is blocking ambient light on one side, but much more effectively is b) to add a potentiometer with a pair of feelers mounted, that biases the power levels supplied to the transistors on either side of the front motor driver, effectively shortening the stride on that side of the robot.

      Hope you enjoy, Connor
    • yahmez_alpha
      ... Bisymet... is it a variation of Wilf s circuit of the same name? That s cool, it sounds like it would work well in a pre determined lighting, but in an
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 10, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "connor_ramsey@..." wrote:
        >
        > Hello? anyone out there?
        >
        > I'm working on a light seeking symet too. Shouldn't all symets be light seeking? Anyway, It's gonna be called "Bisymet", due to the fact that it's longer than it is wide, and because it can move in two directions.
        > It doesn't ACTUALLY have any dedicated light sensors, but it uses a zener diode to measure the average voltage output of the solar panel, and if the voltage is too low, the transistor coupling switches state, reversing the motor's direction on the next solar engine cycle. So basically, Bisymet will keep moving forward until the light gets too dim, indicating it has moved away from the light source, it reverses its direction until it migrates back into it's "comfort zone". Otherwise, Bisymet will simply bump its way out of any encounter with an obstacle, like a normal symet. Although I intend to off-center the motor shaft to create a more interesting exploration behavior. Again I think that should be standard among symets.
        >
        > Concerning that FLED walker i mentioned earlier, the rear FLEDs can simply double as light sensors to bias the rear motor toward light.
        > The only ways I can figure to fit any obstacle avoidance are a) use the light sensing FLEDs to detect when an object is blocking ambient light on one side, but much more effectively is b) to add a potentiometer with a pair of feelers mounted, that biases the power levels supplied to the transistors on either side of the front motor driver, effectively shortening the stride on that side of the robot.
        >
        > Hope you enjoy, Connor
        >

        Bisymet... is it a variation of Wilf's circuit of the same name?
        That's cool, it sounds like it would work well in a pre determined lighting, but in an environment with dimmer lighting it might just reverse back and forth each pop though, or in sunlight it would never reverse... maybe you could you bias the 'reverse' trigger so that it worked equally well in real world lighting.

        I have to say, I really don't grasp your exclusively FLED walker... D o you have a schematic?

        What types of beam bots have you made before Conner? You seem to have some intriguing ideas.

        -James
      • connor_ramsey@ymail.com
        ... I actually haven t heard of Wilf s Bisymet. I see the issue you present, but let me clarify the intent of the reverse function. The quirks you present
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 18, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "yahmez_alpha" wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "connor_ramsey@" wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello? anyone out there?
          > >
          > > I'm working on a light seeking symet too. Shouldn't all symets be light seeking? Anyway, It's gonna be called "Bisymet", due to the fact that it's longer than it is wide, and because it can move in two directions.
          > > It doesn't ACTUALLY have any dedicated light sensors, but it uses a zener diode to measure the average voltage output of the solar panel, and if the voltage is too low, the transistor coupling switches state, reversing the motor's direction on the next solar engine cycle. So basically, Bisymet will keep moving forward until the light gets too dim, indicating it has moved away from the light source, it reverses its direction until it migrates back into it's "comfort zone". Otherwise, Bisymet will simply bump its way out of any encounter with an obstacle, like a normal symet. Although I intend to off-center the motor shaft to create a more interesting exploration behavior. Again I think that should be standard among symets.
          > >
          > > Concerning that FLED walker i mentioned earlier, the rear FLEDs can simply double as light sensors to bias the rear motor toward light.
          > > The only ways I can figure to fit any obstacle avoidance are a) use the light sensing FLEDs to detect when an object is blocking ambient light on one side, but much more effectively is b) to add a potentiometer with a pair of feelers mounted, that biases the power levels supplied to the transistors on either side of the front motor driver, effectively shortening the stride on that side of the robot.
          > >
          > > Hope you enjoy, Connor
          > >
          >
          > Bisymet... is it a variation of Wilf's circuit of the same name?
          > That's cool, it sounds like it would work well in a pre determined lighting, but in an environment with dimmer lighting it might just reverse back and forth each pop though, or in sunlight it would never reverse... maybe you could you bias the 'reverse' trigger so that it worked equally well in real world lighting.
          >
          > I have to say, I really don't grasp your exclusively FLED walker... D o you have a schematic?
          >
          > What types of beam bots have you made before Conner? You seem to have some intriguing ideas.
          >
          > -James
          >

          I actually haven't heard of Wilf's Bisymet. I see the issue you present, but let me clarify the intent of the reverse function. The "quirks" you present are actually part of my design. If the bot is in full sunlight, it doesn't need to reverse because its being bathed in energy. It only changes direction when its current trajectory starts moving out of the light. However I do see your point very clearly on the "back and forth" issue. Eventually Bisymet would get stuck at the threshold from the light source where the bot would simply oscillate around the threshold. I suppose that simply moving forward in high light levels and moving back in low levels isn't the most beneficial behavior that Bisymet could emulate. What I suppose instead is that Bisymet have a T flip-flop after the zener diode, so that the symet continuously moves in one direction UNTIL the light level slips below the acceptable threshold and THEN the bot changes direction again. This way Bisymet will stay within an acceptable distance from the light source, but will cover ALL the territory in range of the light, rather than getting stuck on the outskirts.

          I haven't really completed any bots yet. Just lifeless, mutilated mechanical corpses lying on a desk bathing in junk. The only two I've really completed are a large bristlebot using a headless electric toothbrush strapped to a nailbrush (broken), and a turbot made out of k'nex
        • arno_brosi
          Hello(sorry for the late reply) I m still very much interested in BEAM but haven t built one in awhile.I was too busy making joule thieves and Theremins and
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 19, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello(sorry for the late reply)
            I'm still very much interested in BEAM but haven't built one in awhile.I was too busy making joule thieves and Theremins and sometimes those two in one project.
            Anyway,your Bisymet sounds interesting and I might make one myself sometime(do you have a drawing of the circuit?)

            regards,Arno

            --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "connor_ramsey@..." wrote:
            >
            > Hello? anyone out there?
            >
            > I'm working on a light seeking symet too. Shouldn't all symets be light seeking? Anyway, It's gonna be called "Bisymet", due to the fact that it's longer than it is wide, and because it can move in two directions.
            > It doesn't ACTUALLY have any dedicated light sensors, but it uses a zener diode to measure the average voltage output of the solar panel, and if the voltage is too low, the transistor coupling switches state, reversing the motor's direction on the next solar engine cycle. So basically, Bisymet will keep moving forward until the light gets too dim, indicating it has moved away from the light source, it reverses its direction until it migrates back into it's "comfort zone". Otherwise, Bisymet will simply bump its way out of any encounter with an obstacle, like a normal symet. Although I intend to off-center the motor shaft to create a more interesting exploration behavior. Again I think that should be standard among symets.
            >
            > Concerning that FLED walker i mentioned earlier, the rear FLEDs can simply double as light sensors to bias the rear motor toward light.
            > The only ways I can figure to fit any obstacle avoidance are a) use the light sensing FLEDs to detect when an object is blocking ambient light on one side, but much more effectively is b) to add a potentiometer with a pair of feelers mounted, that biases the power levels supplied to the transistors on either side of the front motor driver, effectively shortening the stride on that side of the robot.
            >
            > Hope you enjoy, Connor
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.