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Memristor

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  • Andrew Hill
    Hi, I came across a video claiming to show a memristor constructed from sulfur, copper and aluminium, here; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlswP_qXbdA Is
    Message 1 of 64 , Nov 14, 2011
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      Hi,

      I came across a video claiming to show a memristor constructed from sulfur, copper and aluminium, here;

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlswP_qXbdA

      Is anyone with access to powdered sulfur able to replicate this?

      I've found some very interesting papers (although I'm a little lost with the math) on producing chaotic behavior with memristors in oscillatory circuits, I'd have thought this would lend itself to some interesting analogue computing concepts.

      Does anyone have any ideas as to how to use this type of component in Beam style analogue computing circuits? For sure we can use them in logic (in the same way that diodes can be used to construct logic) gates - and the slow "sticky" response characteristic of a memristor certainly looks like it could be used for some clever behavior, in addition to a form of BEAM compatible memory.

      Thanks,
      Andrew
    • <rlnansel@...>
      Well, fsck me sideways with a broom! All these years I ve been hallucinating that R in memistor. You are, of course, right. Still, it seems to me a
      Message 64 of 64 , Jan 29, 2014
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        Well, fsck me sideways with a broom! All these years I've been hallucinating that  "R" in memistor. You are, of course, right.


        Still, it seems to me a 3-terminal device would be handier than a 2-terminal device because then one could use the "neurons that fire together wire together" algorithm to automatically adjust the resistances of memistor synaptic weights.


        During normal operation the memister works like an ordinary resistor, but during the adaptation mode (between firings?)  inactive-exicitory and inactive-inhibitory memistors are left alone, while each memistor element that was active-exicitory when the neuron fired gets a dose of plating current to decrease resistance,  and active-inhibitory memisters get reverse plating current to increase resistance.


        There is the added complication that the old memistors used AC current during normal resistance mode (presumably to prevent plating action), but with modern semiconductor circuits it might not be necessary since the plating control electrode could be shorted to one end of the resistance with a transistor switch. Just thinking out loud, here.


        -Bobby


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