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Beam Pendulum circuit

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  • Patrick
    I ve kinda asked this before but whats the best way to give the magnet a solid kick when it passes the coild. Is it the solar panel? The capacitor? A
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 10 5:13 PM
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      I've kinda asked this before but whats the best way to give the magnet a solid kick when it passes the coild. Is it the solar panel? The capacitor? A combination? what do you feel would be the most powerful ad effective for really launching that magnet?
    • Patrick
      I m looking for complete rotation. When you link up a couple of coils together what ends up happening...will they act as one?
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 10 5:31 PM
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        I'm looking for complete rotation. When you link up a couple of coils together what ends up happening...will they act as one?

        --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, William Koepp <william.koepp@...> wrote:
        >
        > Is it just a pendulum or do you want a complete rotation? Ether way weight distribution is very important to keep a pendulum swinging and as well to keep it efficient. The heavier the pendulum the more power you need to get it going(higher voltage). As well take into consideration where you placed your fulcrum...is it at the top, the middle of the arm, also is there a counter weight? All these things you need to keep in mind. But in general the "short burst" setup of the miller solar engine is I think what you are looking for.
        >
        > William Koepp
        >
      • William Koepp
        Is it just a pendulum or do you want a complete rotation? Ether way weight distribution is very important to keep a pendulum swinging and as well to keep it
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 10 5:32 PM
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          Is it just a pendulum or do you want a complete rotation? Ether way weight distribution is very important to keep a pendulum swinging and as well to keep it efficient. The heavier the pendulum the more power you need to get it going(higher voltage). As well take into consideration where you placed your fulcrum...is it at the top, the middle of the arm, also is there a counter weight? All these things you need to keep in mind. But in general the "short burst" setup of the miller solar engine is I think what you are looking for.

          William Koepp
        • William Koepp
          Errr...well I think that depends on How you hook them up. Posting a photo would help then I could see what your trying to do. If you keep the flow of current
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 10 6:00 PM
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            Errr...well I think that depends on How you hook them up. Posting a photo would help then I could see what your trying to do. If you keep the flow of current moving the same way in both your coils, that is if there side by side, then yes they should act as one. But like I said before the more voltage you add to your coil the stronger it should be. If you just stick two coils side by side and don't change voltage then the current voltage is now powering more object deluding the strength of the coil overall.

            William Koepp
          • William Koepp
            Oh also think about using a counter weight to help rotation. Here is a website where a guy made a complete rotation swinger(pendulum). Maybe it will help with
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 10 6:06 PM
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              Oh also think about using a counter weight to help rotation. Here is a website where a guy made a complete rotation swinger(pendulum). Maybe it will help with your plans.
              http://www.smfr.org/robots/

              William Koepp
            • Zozzles T. Freep
              ... As such, your question does not make sense. The only two items in a force field pendulum that have any effect on the mass - whether it is implemented as
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 21, 2011
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                On Sun, Apr 10, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Patrick <patrickp200@...> wrote:
                 

                ...a solid kick when it passes the coild {{spelling?}}. Is it the solar panel...

                As such, your question does not make sense.

                The only two items in a "force field" pendulum that have any effect on the mass - whether it is implemented as a coil or a magnet - are those two things. The solar cell could be in a completely different room (providing it could supply enough _power_ (in the literal, electrical sense), so the question doesn't make sense. To put it another way, what difference does it make -when- the coil (or magnet) passes the solar cell if, as noted, the solar cell doesn't even have to be anywhere close to the apparatus??

                If you are concerned with the two items in the pendulum that are "affected by" (use) the power involved, then if they are directly above each other (perpendicular to the earth's surface, directly on a radius of the earth's gravity)  then a "kick" at best would either PULL DOWN or PUSH UP on the object that is swinging.

                I don't believe either of those would improve the operation of the pendulum. If the swinging mass was 'suddenly kicked upwards', then it would merely hop a tiny bit over the other object and NO momentum would be increased in the direction of movement. If the swinging mass was 'suddenly pulled downwards', it is a similar situation, but presuming that the 'cord' on which the mass is swinging and the stand holding it were _perfectly_ stable/solid then, once again, NO momentum is increased in the direction of movement.

                In a sense, the point is that you don't get something for nothing ("There ain't no such thing as a free lunch".)

                At best, the area that bears investigation would be the angle from perpendicular where the "push" or "pull"is most effective.


                IMNSHO
                (and I realize I could be spouting balloon juice),

                YfH

              • E.M.
                ... His question refers to the source of the power that drives the pendulum. He is asking if the solar panel is coupled directly to power the magnet, or is it
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 7, 2011
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                    ...a solid kick when it passes the coild {{spelling?}}. Is it the solar panel...
                  Hogfather writes:
                  As such, your question does not make sense.
                  em replies:
                  His question refers to the source of the power that drives the pendulum. He is asking if the solar panel is coupled directly to power the magnet, or is it instead driven by a capacitor.
                   

                  Hogfather writes:
                  If you are concerned with the two items in the pendulum that are "affected by" (use) the power involved, then if they are directly above each other (perpendicular to the earth's surface, directly on a radius of the earth's gravity)  then a "kick" at best would either PULL DOWN or PUSH UP on the object that is swinging.

                  em writes:
                  Of course the "pull down" part of the gravity vector can be resolved into two components; one pointing away from the pivot point, and the other orthgonal to that. It is the second vector that provides the restoring force that drives the pendulum. The role of the electro magnet of course, is to contribute to that vector.

                  Hogfather writes:
                  I don't believe either of those would improve the operation of the pendulum. If the swinging mass was 'suddenly kicked upwards', then it would merely hop a tiny bit over the other object and NO momentum would be increased in the direction of movement. If the swinging mass was 'suddenly pulled downwards', it is a similar situation, but presuming that the 'cord' on which the mass is swinging and the stand holding it were _perfectly_ stable/solid then, once again, NO momentum is increased in the direction of movement.

                  em writes:
                  Neither Patrick, nor anyone else here, wrote or implied that he wanted to kick the pendulum upwards, or even downwards, but simply for the apparatus to to function like every other electric pendulum. In this case, the electromagnet alternately attracts and repels the pendulum weight - as I wrote above, contributing to the restoring vector to a point where any losses in the system are overcome and, eventually, matched perfectly. The mass does no hopping, or pulling.

                  Hogfather writes:
                  None has
                  In a sense, the point is that you don't get something for nothing ("There ain't no such thing as a free lunch".)
                  em writes:
                  Of course, this is the reason that patrick was asking his question in the first place - now that he's paid for his lunch, he wants to know which is best to eat..

                  Hogfather writes:
                  At best, the area that bears investigation would be the angle from perpendicular where the "push" or "pull"is most effective.

                  em writes:
                  This is already and established and known parameter - at least, for a gravity-driven pendulum (which is not a magnetic field, which decays with position like 1/r^2), that angle is 45 degrees: this is the angle where the majority of the power supplied by gravity is shifted into the restoring vector.

                  Just my two cents, not humble or otherwise.
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