Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit Element,

Expand Messages
  • praetorious
    Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates since around April, but a new electronic circuit element, the Memristor, has been created. The most
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 18 8:10 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates since around
      April, but a new electronic circuit element, the Memristor, has been
      created.
      The most interesting characteristic of the device is that it remembers
      the amount of charge which flows through it.


      The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge has gone
      though it. If charge flows in one direction the resistance will
      increase. However, if the charge now flows in the opposite direction
      it will decrease.

      These things can probably be used as digital switches or new analog
      devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal computing?
    • Gary T
      Those things have been out for years. They are called digital pots, still too big for me in miniature robotics The only way that I can use them is if they are
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 18 11:26 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Those things have been out for years.

        They are called digital pots, still too big for me in miniature robotics
        The only way that I can use them is if they are in 0603 or 0805 low
        profile type packages.

        Gary T

        >Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates since around
        >April, but a new electronic circuit element, the Memristor, has been
        >created.
        >The most interesting characteristic of the device is that it remembers
        >the amount of charge which flows through it.
        >
        >The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge has gone
        >though it. If charge flows in one direction the resistance will
        >increase. However, if the charge now flows in the opposite direction
        >it will decrease.
        >
        >These things can probably be used as digital switches or new analog
        >devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal computing?
        >
        >
      • wrigter
        This is not some new IC but a scientific breakthrough. It is the discovery of a new fundamental electronic circuit element whose existence was predicted 37
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 19 7:26 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          This is not some new IC but a scientific breakthrough. It is
          the discovery of a new fundamental electronic circuit
          element whose existence was predicted 37 years ago. The
          Memristor is the stuff of Asimov's fabled Positronic brain
          that used a Platinum Iridium alloy as a substrate for neural
          networks. Very beamish!

          wilf

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Gary T <grogyan@...>
          To: beam@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit
          Element,
          Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 18:26:37 +1200

          >Those things have been out for years.
          >
          >They are called digital pots, still too big for me in
          >miniature robotics The only way that I can use them is if
          >they are in 0603 or 0805 low profile type packages.
          >
          >Gary T
          >
          >>Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates
          >>since around April, but a new electronic circuit element,
          >>the Memristor, has been created.
          >>The most interesting characteristic of the device is that
          >>it remembers the amount of charge which flows through it.
          >>
          >>The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge
          >>has gone though it. If charge flows in one direction the
          >>resistance will increase. However, if the charge now flows
          >>in the opposite direction it will decrease.
          >>
          >>These things can probably be used as digital switches or
          >>new analog devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal
          >>computing?
          >>
          >
          >
          >
        • Richard Caudle
          So the question arises...how do we make them and where do we find materials?  :P NOTICE! THE CONTENTS OF THIS ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION ARE CONFIDENTIAL AND
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 19 10:02 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            So the question arises...how do we make them and where do we find materials?  :P

            NOTICE! THE CONTENTS OF THIS ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION ARE
            CONFIDENTIAL AND PROTECTED UNDER COPYRIGHT. USE BY ANYONE
            OTHER THAN THE LISTED RECIPIENT(s) IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED

            --- On Tue, 8/19/08, wrigter <wrigter@...> wrote:
            From: wrigter <wrigter@...>
            Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit Element,
            To: beam@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:26 AM

            This is not some new IC but a scientific breakthrough. It is
            the discovery of a new fundamental electronic circuit
            element whose existence was predicted 37 years ago. The
            Memristor is the stuff of Asimov's fabled Positronic brain
            that used a Platinum Iridium alloy as a substrate for neural
            networks. Very beamish!

            wilf

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Gary T <grogyan@woosh. co.nz>
            To: beam@yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit
            Element,
            Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 18:26:37 +1200

            >Those things have been out for years.
            >
            >They are called digital pots, still too big for me in
            >miniature robotics The only way that I can use them is if
            >they are in 0603 or 0805 low profile type packages.
            >
            >Gary T
            >
            >>Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates
            >>since around April, but a new electronic circuit element,
            >>the Memristor, has been created.
            >>The most interesting characteristic of the device is that
            >>it remembers the amount of charge which flows through it.
            >>
            >>The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge
            >>has gone though it. If charge flows in one direction the
            >>resistance will increase. However, if the charge now flows
            >>in the opposite direction it will decrease.
            >>
            >>These things can probably be used as digital switches or
            >>new analog devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal
            >>computing?
            >>
            >
            >
            >
          • antti10001
            ... materials? :P Well, the Memristor made by HP Labs don t use platinum iridium alloy, but apparently titanium dioxide, which is much more common material.
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 27 3:17 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, Richard Caudle <frankendaddy@...> wrote:
              >
              > So the question arises...how do we make them and where do we find
              materials? :P

              Well, the Memristor made by HP Labs don't use platinum iridium alloy,
              but apparently titanium dioxide, which is much more common material.
              (E.g. in toothpaste).

              See the Wikipedia-article:
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor
              and then read EE times and IEEE Spectrum articles
              linked at the end of page (they are both good).

              I just wonder when memristors are available
              as macroscopic components (i.e. not as a part
              of some gigabyte-sized exotic memory chip)
              if ever.

              One particularly nice feature is that they "remember
              their value", i.e. are not volatile. That would be useful
              in a solar-powered robot, that tries to accomplish some
              "long-term" task requiring multiple cycles of wake-ups and
              sleep. Also, analogish, not just digital.

              Now everybody, start writing patent applications where some
              simple (or complex) task has been implemented with the help of a
              memristor. Or publish your ideas here instead, as a "prior art",
              foiling the plans of evil patent lawers...

              Cheers,

              Antti



              > --- On Tue, 8/19/08, wrigter <wrigter@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: wrigter <wrigter@...>
              > Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit Element,
              > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:26 AM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > This is not some new IC but a scientific breakthrough. It is
              > the discovery of a new fundamental electronic circuit
              > element whose existence was predicted 37 years ago. The
              > Memristor is the stuff of Asimov's fabled Positronic brain
              > that used a Platinum Iridium alloy as a substrate for neural
              > networks. Very beamish!
              >
              > wilf
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Gary T <grogyan@woosh. co.nz>
              > To: beam@yahoogroups. com
              > Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit
              > Element,
              > Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 18:26:37 +1200
              >
              > >Those things have been out for years.
              > >
              > >They are called digital pots, still too big for me in
              > >miniature robotics The only way that I can use them is if
              > >they are in 0603 or 0805 low profile type packages.
              > >
              > >Gary T
              > >
              > >>Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates
              > >>since around April, but a new electronic circuit element,
              > >>the Memristor, has been created.
              > >>The most interesting characteristic of the device is that
              > >>it remembers the amount of charge which flows through it.
              > >>
              > >>The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge
              > >>has gone though it. If charge flows in one direction the
              > >>resistance will increase. However, if the charge now flows
              > >>in the opposite direction it will decrease.
              > >>
              > >>These things can probably be used as digital switches or
              > >>new analog devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal
              > >>computing?
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • antti10001
              Watching a pair of symets dancing quietly on linoleum floor in sun light gives me already a sense of something almost alive , although I, as their builder,
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 27 3:42 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Watching a pair of symets dancing quietly on linoleum floor
                in sun light gives me already a sense of something
                "almost alive", although I, as their builder, know that they don't
                have a brain of whatsoever. At first thought, it seems
                that their solar cell is their only input from the world.
                Then, on the second thought, one must admit, that
                also their radial capacitors work as some kind of sensors,
                with which they can detect the walls into which they bump to,
                and react accordingly, although the signal does not even pass
                from a purely physical/mechanical realm to electric.

                In any case, their movements remind me of the movements
                of pond skaters on a quiet summer evening. Especially when
                they engage each other, and the stronger tries to push
                the other out of that small rectangle in my kitchen,
                where the sun shines.

                Then I got an idea. What if a symet could control its
                own direction? How?
                How about a small stepper motor on the top of the main motor (one
                could have three smaller solar cells glued to the capacitors, instead
                of one at the top), with a piece of metal affixed to its shaft
                perpendicularly? (A bit like a flag). The symet should be built very
                balanced (when considered without that extra weight), and then
                just by rotating the metal weight to appropriate direction, the symet
                could change on which two capacitors' edges it is sitting on,
                and so, to which of the three available directions it is going
                to.
                Still, making it act like a photovore would be a challenge.
                Maybe one needs memristors for that? ;-)


                --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, I wrote about memristors:
                >
                > One particularly nice feature is that they "remember
                > their value", i.e. are not volatile. That would be useful
                > in a solar-powered robot, that tries to accomplish some
                > "long-term" task requiring multiple cycles of wake-ups and
                > sleep. Also, analogish, not just digital.
                >


                Cheers,

                Antti
              • Richard Piotter
                I ve been reading up on this crossbar latch that HP has been working on. I think that while individual Memristors need to come out as discrete components the
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 28 8:55 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  I've been reading up on this crossbar latch that HP has been working
                  on. I think that while individual Memristors need to come out as
                  discrete components the same way as resistors, capacitors, etc do, we
                  shouldn't discount the crossbar latch itself. They speak of it
                  working in both analog and digital modes. A grid of memristors in
                  such a device could have amazingly useful potential for more advanced
                  BEAM applications. I envision linking sensors to control lines on
                  these arrays, and creating wide networks of Memristor "synapses".
                  This may be exactly the device that BEAM has needed but not had to
                  progress forward.

                  I can't wait until both individual Memristor components and crossbar
                  latch chips are released.

                  Richard Piotter



                  Begin forwarded message:

                  > From: "antti10001" <antti10001@...>
                  > Date: August 27, 2008 5:17:36 PM CDT
                  > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [beam] Re: MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit Element,
                  > Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, Richard Caudle <frankendaddy@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > So the question arises...how do we make them and where do we find
                  > materials? :P
                  >
                  > Well, the Memristor made by HP Labs don't use platinum iridium alloy,
                  > but apparently titanium dioxide, which is much more common material.
                  > (E.g. in toothpaste).
                  >
                  > See the Wikipedia-article:
                  > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor
                  > and then read EE times and IEEE Spectrum articles
                  > linked at the end of page (they are both good).
                  >
                  > I just wonder when memristors are available
                  > as macroscopic components (i.e. not as a part
                  > of some gigabyte-sized exotic memory chip)
                  > if ever.
                  >
                  > One particularly nice feature is that they "remember
                  > their value", i.e. are not volatile. That would be useful
                  > in a solar-powered robot, that tries to accomplish some
                  > "long-term" task requiring multiple cycles of wake-ups and
                  > sleep. Also, analogish, not just digital.
                  >
                  > Now everybody, start writing patent applications where some
                  > simple (or complex) task has been implemented with the help of a
                  > memristor. Or publish your ideas here instead, as a "prior art",
                  > foiling the plans of evil patent lawers...
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  >
                  > Antti
                  >
                  > > --- On Tue, 8/19/08, wrigter <wrigter@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > From: wrigter <wrigter@...>
                  > > Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit Element,
                  > > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
                  > > Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:26 AM
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > This is not some new IC but a scientific breakthrough. It is
                  > > the discovery of a new fundamental electronic circuit
                  > > element whose existence was predicted 37 years ago. The
                  > > Memristor is the stuff of Asimov's fabled Positronic brain
                  > > that used a Platinum Iridium alloy as a substrate for neural
                  > > networks. Very beamish!
                  > >
                  > > wilf
                  > >
                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > From: Gary T <grogyan@woosh. co.nz>
                  > > To: beam@yahoogroups. com
                  > > Subject: Re: [beam] MEMRISTOR , New electronic circuit
                  > > Element,
                  > > Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 18:26:37 +1200
                  > >
                  > > >Those things have been out for years.
                  > > >
                  > > >They are called digital pots, still too big for me in
                  > > >miniature robotics The only way that I can use them is if
                  > > >they are in 0603 or 0805 low profile type packages.
                  > > >
                  > > >Gary T
                  > > >
                  > > >>Hey all, i might be a bit late on this, in terms of dates
                  > > >>since around April, but a new electronic circuit element,
                  > > >>the Memristor, has been created.
                  > > >>The most interesting characteristic of the device is that
                  > > >>it remembers the amount of charge which flows through it.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>The resistance of a memristor depends on how much charge
                  > > >>has gone though it. If charge flows in one direction the
                  > > >>resistance will increase. However, if the charge now flows
                  > > >>in the opposite direction it will decrease.
                  > > >>
                  > > >>These things can probably be used as digital switches or
                  > > >>new analog devices. Perhaps used in Nv memory and neuronal
                  > > >>computing?
                  > > >>
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.