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Four-Eved Head Videos

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  • J Wolfgang Goerlich
    Hello group, We have been speaking of videos, heads with tactile sensors, and Bicore tube architectures, and other things Beamish. This reminded me of the Four
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 2, 2008
      Hello group,

      We have been speaking of videos, heads with tactile sensors, and
      Bicore tube architectures, and other things Beamish. This reminded me
      of the Four Eyed Head (FEH). I uploaded a couple videos showing how
      this head acts. The schematic is in the YFH Challenge folder (this is
      version 1.2).

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-d_rtqU2nk
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjwIExR_gRw
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/beam/files/YFH%20Challenge/

      The duty cycle of the Phototropic Suspended Bicores determines the
      frequency of the motor Bicore. The heads arc or distance traveled is
      determined not by the overall luminance but rather by the edges of
      the light pool.

      FEH's dark response is to circle in one direction, continuously
      scanning. Sometimes it will reverse the motor for a brief period,
      then return to scanning. This reverse seems to be dependent upon the
      light level.

      FEH's bright response is to arc within the source of light. So, in a
      bright window sill, the head turns maybe 120-degrees, centered on the
      outside light. Facing that same window from a distance of 12', the
      head turns maybe 20-degrees, still centered.

      Periodically, FEH overshoots the light pool. It then scans in a
      complete circle. Yesterday, when in the window sill under a noonday
      sun, FEH did this scan about one time in twenty cycles. Thus far, I
      have not been able to coax a dazzle response out of FEH.

      In sum, FEH is paradoxically more stable than the traditional single
      Bicore Beam head. More to come, as I find time to play with different
      RC values.

      J Wolfgang Goerlich
    • jabmechtech
      That is COOL! I like the way it Scans. it seems to have very deliberate movement not spaztic like some heads. jab ... me ... is ... is ... the ... a ... the
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 2, 2008
        That is COOL! I like the way it Scans. it seems to have very
        deliberate movement not spaztic like some heads.
        jab

        --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "J Wolfgang Goerlich" <jwgoerlich@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello group,
        >
        > We have been speaking of videos, heads with tactile sensors, and
        > Bicore tube architectures, and other things Beamish. This reminded
        me
        > of the Four Eyed Head (FEH). I uploaded a couple videos showing how
        > this head acts. The schematic is in the YFH Challenge folder (this
        is
        > version 1.2).
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-d_rtqU2nk
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjwIExR_gRw
        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/beam/files/YFH%20Challenge/
        >
        > The duty cycle of the Phototropic Suspended Bicores determines the
        > frequency of the motor Bicore. The heads arc or distance traveled
        is
        > determined not by the overall luminance but rather by the edges of
        > the light pool.
        >
        > FEH's dark response is to circle in one direction, continuously
        > scanning. Sometimes it will reverse the motor for a brief period,
        > then return to scanning. This reverse seems to be dependent upon
        the
        > light level.
        >
        > FEH's bright response is to arc within the source of light. So, in
        a
        > bright window sill, the head turns maybe 120-degrees, centered on
        the
        > outside light. Facing that same window from a distance of 12', the
        > head turns maybe 20-degrees, still centered.
        >
        > Periodically, FEH overshoots the light pool. It then scans in a
        > complete circle. Yesterday, when in the window sill under a noonday
        > sun, FEH did this scan about one time in twenty cycles. Thus far,
        I
        > have not been able to coax a dazzle response out of FEH.
        >
        > In sum, FEH is paradoxically more stable than the traditional
        single
        > Bicore Beam head. More to come, as I find time to play with
        different
        > RC values.
        >
        > J Wolfgang Goerlich
        >
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