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Re: [beam] Re: Transducer Question

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  • Simon Fraser
    I m guessing that it s used as an atomizer; when submerged, it creates a mist of water droplets in the air which create fog effect. It s usually on sale at
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 30, 2007
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      I'm guessing that it's used as an atomizer; when submerged,
      it creates a mist of water droplets in the air which create
      fog effect. It's usually on sale at garden centers for people
      to use in table-top fountains and the like.

      Simon

      On Nov 30, 2007, at 3:50 pm, wrigter wrote:

      > What would utrasonic transducers be doing in a garden
      > center? Pet or vermin repellent or utrasonic cleaner? What
      > was the purpose of the transducer in the tornado box?
      > Standing wave maker?
      >
      > wilf
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "capnkirk007" <mbkirk@...>
      > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [beam] Re: Transducer Question
      > Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2007 22:18:19 -0000
      >
      >> I have used ultrasonic transducers to make a "tornado"
      >> project with my daughter back when she was in middle
      >> school. We made a 4-sided box, one side clear plastic,
      >> all sides with edge air inlets, and placed a bowl filled
      >> with water and an ultrasonic transducer in the bottom,
      >> with a computer fan at the top, pulling air out of the
      >> box. With lighting from the top, it makes a great
      >> tornado that you can experiment with (water temperature,
      >> etc.).
      >>
      >> The ultrasonic transducers are cheap (around $12) and
      >> readily available in the garden department of many stores
      >> (I got mine at the local "Do It Center". They consist of
      >> a small (1-inch by 1.5-inch) metal water-immersible
      >> device connected by long plastic-coated wire to a
      >> transformer and then to a wall plug.
      >>
      >> --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wilf_nv" <wrigter@...>
      >> wrote: >
      >>>
      >>> The ultrasonic transmitter and receiver tarnsducers are
      >>> tuned to an ultrasonic frequency ie 40kHz. Typical
      >> piezo transducers are designed
      >>> for operating in the audible range and ususally resonate
      >> around 4kHz.
      >>>
      >>> wilf
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "jing.alcantara"
      >>> <jing.alcantara@> wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Hi guys,
      >>>>
      >>>> I already posted this question a few days ago
      >> and i thought i
      >>>> might just repeat it. Could a piezo transducer replace
      >>> an ultrasonic
      >>>> transducer? Thanks in advance.
      >>>>
      >>>> Jing
      >>>>
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • wilf_nv
      Richard Torrens is truly an analogical genius. Note that the UltraSonic transmitter circuit oscillates at the natural 40kHz frequency of the transducer and the
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 1, 2007
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        Richard Torrens is truly an analogical genius. Note that the
        UltraSonic transmitter circuit oscillates at the natural 40kHz
        frequency of the transducer and the circuit is modulated (turned on
        and off) at 480Hz by the multivibrator section. If you substitute a
        piezo speaker for the transducer you will get a "sonalert" beeper.





        --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Charles" <jodicalhon@...> wrote:
        >
        > There's some info on this site that might help, Jing. Have a look,
        > anyway.
        >
        > http://www.4qdtec.com/ultra.html
        >
        > Jo
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "jing.alcantara" <jing.alcantara@>
        wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi guys,
        > >
        > > I already posted this question a few days ago and i thought
        i
        > > might just repeat it. Could a piezo transducer replace an
        ultrasonic
        > > transducer? Thanks in advance.
        > >
        > > Jing
        > >
        >
      • capnkirk007
        Small ultrasonic transducers are placed into garden ponds to make fog floating over the pond. You guys gotta get out more. ;) This time of year they are
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 1, 2007
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          Small ultrasonic transducers are placed into garden ponds to
          make "fog" floating over the pond. You guys gotta get out more. ;)
          This time of year they are available, as they are "seasonal" around
          Halloween and the holidays. As for the transducer in the tornado
          box, that sits inside a short bucket of water and generates the fog
          that gets sucked up by the computer fan out of the box at the top.
          The twisting of the tornado is caused by the 4 sides of the box
          offset sideways by about 1 inch, with the front panel clear (so you
          can see the tornado!) and the other three sides black. A flashlight
          from the top of the box shining through a hole in the top illuminates
          the "tornado". Makes a nice science project for middle school, like
          I said. I have a few pictures on my home web site at:
          http://westhillser.net/photopage/projects/frame.html
          Go to the bottom of page 1 and the top of page 2 and you can see the
          tornado generator. The 2 black wires go to 2 ultrasonic
          transducers, 'cuz 1 is good, but 2 is better. (I'm planning to add a
          BEAM-bot section to my web page, but I've been busy studying for my
          Extra class HAM license.)

          Actually, you can also buy ultrasonic transducers as plug-in
          household vermin-annoying devices. Household pest section, isle 9.

          The garden section, incidentally, also has nice coils which are used
          to regulate automatic sprinklers but can be used for lots of other
          things.

          --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wrigter" <wrigter@...> wrote:
          >
          > What would utrasonic transducers be doing in a garden
          > center? Pet or vermin repellent or utrasonic cleaner? What
          > was the purpose of the transducer in the tornado box?
          > Standing wave maker?
          >
          > wilf
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "capnkirk007" <mbkirk@...>
          > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [beam] Re: Transducer Question
          > Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2007 22:18:19 -0000
          >
          > > I have used ultrasonic transducers to make a "tornado"
          > > project with my daughter back when she was in middle
          > > school. We made a 4-sided box, one side clear plastic,
          > > all sides with edge air inlets, and placed a bowl filled
          > > with water and an ultrasonic transducer in the bottom,
          > > with a computer fan at the top, pulling air out of the
          > > box. With lighting from the top, it makes a great
          > > tornado that you can experiment with (water temperature,
          > > etc.).
          > >
          > > The ultrasonic transducers are cheap (around $12) and
          > > readily available in the garden department of many stores
          > > (I got mine at the local "Do It Center". They consist of
          > > a small (1-inch by 1.5-inch) metal water-immersible
          > > device connected by long plastic-coated wire to a
          > > transformer and then to a wall plug.
          > >
          > > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wilf_nv" <wrigter@>
          > > wrote: >
          > > >
          > > > The ultrasonic transmitter and receiver tarnsducers are
          > > > tuned to an ultrasonic frequency ie 40kHz. Typical
          > > piezo transducers are designed
          > > > for operating in the audible range and ususally resonate
          > > around 4kHz.
          > > >
          > > > wilf
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "jing.alcantara"
          > > > <jing.alcantara@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Hi guys,
          > > > >
          > > > > I already posted this question a few days ago
          > > and i thought i
          > > > > might just repeat it. Could a piezo transducer replace
          > > > an ultrasonic
          > > > > transducer? Thanks in advance.
          > > > >
          > > > > Jing
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • wilf_nv
          Most interesting captn, I never saw these before. The price is right but those transducers are designed for coupling accoustic energy to a fluid and may not
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 1, 2007
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            Most interesting captn,

            I never saw these before. The price is right but those transducers
            are designed for coupling accoustic energy to a fluid and may not
            work in air(??)

            wilf

            --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "capnkirk007" <mbkirk@...> wrote:
            >
            > Small ultrasonic transducers are placed into garden ponds to
            > make "fog" floating over the pond. You guys gotta get out
            more. ;)
            > This time of year they are available, as they are "seasonal" around
            > Halloween and the holidays. As for the transducer in the tornado
            > box, that sits inside a short bucket of water and generates the fog
            > that gets sucked up by the computer fan out of the box at the top.
            > The twisting of the tornado is caused by the 4 sides of the box
            > offset sideways by about 1 inch, with the front panel clear (so you
            > can see the tornado!) and the other three sides black. A
            flashlight
            > from the top of the box shining through a hole in the top
            illuminates
            > the "tornado". Makes a nice science project for middle school,
            like
            > I said. I have a few pictures on my home web site at:
            > http://westhillser.net/photopage/projects/frame.html
            > Go to the bottom of page 1 and the top of page 2 and you can see
            the
            > tornado generator. The 2 black wires go to 2 ultrasonic
            > transducers, 'cuz 1 is good, but 2 is better. (I'm planning to add
            a
            > BEAM-bot section to my web page, but I've been busy studying for my
            > Extra class HAM license.)
            >
            > Actually, you can also buy ultrasonic transducers as plug-in
            > household vermin-annoying devices. Household pest section, isle 9.
            >
            > The garden section, incidentally, also has nice coils which are
            used
            > to regulate automatic sprinklers but can be used for lots of other
            > things.
            >
            > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wrigter" <wrigter@> wrote:
            > >
            > > What would utrasonic transducers be doing in a garden
            > > center? Pet or vermin repellent or utrasonic cleaner? What
            > > was the purpose of the transducer in the tornado box?
            > > Standing wave maker?
            > >
            > > wilf
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: "capnkirk007" <mbkirk@>
            > > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
            > > Subject: [beam] Re: Transducer Question
            > > Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2007 22:18:19 -0000
            > >
            > > > I have used ultrasonic transducers to make a "tornado"
            > > > project with my daughter back when she was in middle
            > > > school. We made a 4-sided box, one side clear plastic,
            > > > all sides with edge air inlets, and placed a bowl filled
            > > > with water and an ultrasonic transducer in the bottom,
            > > > with a computer fan at the top, pulling air out of the
            > > > box. With lighting from the top, it makes a great
            > > > tornado that you can experiment with (water temperature,
            > > > etc.).
            > > >
            > > > The ultrasonic transducers are cheap (around $12) and
            > > > readily available in the garden department of many stores
            > > > (I got mine at the local "Do It Center". They consist of
            > > > a small (1-inch by 1.5-inch) metal water-immersible
            > > > device connected by long plastic-coated wire to a
            > > > transformer and then to a wall plug.
            > > >
            > > > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wilf_nv" <wrigter@>
            > > > wrote: >
            > > > >
            > > > > The ultrasonic transmitter and receiver tarnsducers are
            > > > > tuned to an ultrasonic frequency ie 40kHz. Typical
            > > > piezo transducers are designed
            > > > > for operating in the audible range and ususally resonate
            > > > around 4kHz.
            > > > >
            > > > > wilf
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "jing.alcantara"
            > > > > <jing.alcantara@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Hi guys,
            > > > > >
            > > > > > I already posted this question a few days ago
            > > > and i thought i
            > > > > > might just repeat it. Could a piezo transducer replace
            > > > > an ultrasonic
            > > > > > transducer? Thanks in advance.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Jing
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Joseph Charles
            I m confusing the two types of piezo transducer, one for ultrasonics and the other for audio. :P There s certainly a lot to be learned on the 4QDtec site.
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 2, 2007
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              I'm confusing the two types of piezo transducer, one for ultrasonics
              and the other for audio. :P

              There's certainly a lot to be learned on the 4QDtec site.

              Cheers,

              Jo


              --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "wilf_nv" <wrigter@...> wrote:
              >
              > Richard Torrens is truly an analogical genius. Note that the
              > UltraSonic transmitter circuit oscillates at the natural 40kHz
              > frequency of the transducer and the circuit is modulated (turned on
              > and off) at 480Hz by the multivibrator section. If you substitute a
              > piezo speaker for the transducer you will get a "sonalert" beeper.
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Joseph Charles
              I had seen these foggers at the local garden centre, but had no idea they were ultrasonic based. Y live n learn. :) Jo
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 2, 2007
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                I had seen these 'foggers' at the local garden centre, but had no
                idea they were ultrasonic based.

                Y'live'n'learn. :)

                Jo


                --- In beam@yahoogroups.com, "capnkirk007" <mbkirk@...> wrote:
                >
                > Small ultrasonic transducers are placed into garden ponds to
                > make "fog" floating over the pond. You guys gotta get out more. ;)
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