Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Turning Walker Experimentation (was: a couple more walker questions ...)

Expand Messages
  • J Wolfgang Goerlich
    ... Thank you, Jo. This suggests an experiment. Good. Here is something new to add to my project list, and perhaps a suggestion to those students working on
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Jo C wrote:
      > I've put a photo in the Jo C folder in the photos section.

      Thank you, Jo. This suggests an experiment. Good. Here is something
      new to add to my project list, and perhaps a suggestion to those
      students working on science fair projects.

      The question to answer is: what is the optimal weight distribution
      and Nv Net configuration for the shortest turning radius?

      Build a traditional two motor walker. Have five mounting holes for
      the battery pack, spaced 1 cm apart on the same horizontal plane,
      centered on the motors. This allows moving the center of gravity fore
      or back. Attach one pen to the front legs, and a second to the rear
      legs.

      As you have already done, use the photo ratio duty cycled Bicore as
      the Master, and add a Slave Bicore. Hard wire the photo Bicore with
      resistors. Perhaps 80/20, or 470k/2.2M. Separate the photo Bicore
      from the motor Bicore by means of a DPDT switch, toggling between the
      photo Bicore and Gnd. Use terminal blocks on the motor drivers so
      that the motors can easily be switched from Master or Slave.

      There are ten possibilities to test. The center of gravity can be in
      five locations. The Master Bicore or turning agent can be in two,
      front or rear. The data point is the turning radius.

      The testing procedure would be to mount the battery pack and connect
      the Master Bicore to the front motor, the slave to the rear. Set the
      walker on a white papered surface. Switch the Master Bicore to Gnd
      and get the walker to go straight. Then, switch to Master to the
      Photo Bicore. Measure the diameter of scribbles made by the legs and
      estimate the turn radius. Switch the motors so that the Master is on
      the rear, and then repeat.

      Gotta find more time.

      J Wolfgang Goerlich
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.