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analogue memory

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  • m_momchil
    I was thinking of a BEAM robot that can be programmed. Aren`t cassette tapes analogue or am I dreaming again? My idea is really strange. For exaple: We make a
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 6, 2003
      I was thinking of a BEAM robot that can be programmed.
      Aren`t cassette tapes analogue or am I dreaming again?
      My idea is really strange.
      For exaple:
      We make a robot with two touch sensors and two motors with wheels.
      We make 4 cassette tapes spin with the same speed.2 of them will
      have information for the sensors and the other 2 will have
      information for the motors.So.......when one of the sensors (let`s
      say the left one) hits an object it has a logical "1" (am I going
      digital), the tapes are spining (aways) and when the tape
      corresponding to the left sensorhas a logical "1" and the other tape
      corresponding to the right sensor has a logical "0" ( like the
      situation is [ the left sensor has "1" and the right "0" ] ) the
      other two tapes are checked (the ones corresponding to the motors)
      and if the tape corresponding to the left motor has 1 the left motor
      spins and so on.......
      It`s really confusing.Anyway are cassette tapes digital or
      analogue???And if anyone understands my idea does he think it is
      possible?

      Momchil.
    • J Wolfgang Goerlich
      Yes, tape cassettes are analog. As to the programming method you describe, it reminds me of my old TRS-80s. These Tandy/Radio Shack computers came with tape
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 6, 2003
        Yes, tape cassettes are analog. As to the programming method you
        describe, it reminds me of my old TRS-80s. These Tandy/Radio Shack
        computers came with tape drives that enabled you to save data.

        Momchil wrote:
        > I was thinking of a BEAM robot that can be programmed.
        > Aren`t cassette tapes analogue or am I dreaming again?
        > My idea is really strange.
      • John A. deVries II
        ... So, of course, the tones are obviously analog but they still were used in a binary manner. Zoz
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 6, 2003
          At 01:22 PM 8/6/2003, you wrote:
          >Yes, tape cassettes are analog. As to the programming method you
          >describe, it reminds me of my old TRS-80s. These Tandy/Radio Shack
          >computers came with tape drives that enabled you to save data.

          True enough, using the Kansas City Format or the like:

          >The tape system was *very* slow, both because of the actual data rate and
          >also because of the data format used. A "1" was stored as a short tone
          >pulse at 1.95kHz - a "0" was simply an absence of the tone. This crude
          >system worked reasonably well at the low data rate used (once the bug in
          >the tape read routine of the original NASBUG had been fixed). The problem
          >was that this system was very susceptible to spurious "clicks" and " pops"
          >and also suffered if low quality tape was used as "drop-outs" could be
          >read as "0" bits. Because of this increasing the data rate was not always
          >easy.
          >
          >A design for an improved cassette interface for the NASCOM-1 was published
          >in PCW. This used the "CUTS" (Computer Users Tape Standard) format - also
          >known as the "Kansas City" format. This represents a "1& as a 2400Hz tone
          >and a "0" as a 1200Hz tone. The interface was always known to NASCOM users
          >as the "Cottis-Blandford" system after the designers. Of course this
          >system was not compatible with the original system, but it was so much
          >more reliable that the older system got left behind. The "standard" that
          >emerged used this interface at 1200 baud. This was readable on both
          >NASCOM-1 and NASCOM-2 systems, although the NASCOM-2 (and modified
          >NASCOM-1 systems) could also use 2400 baud with a bit less reliability.
          >Many program tapes were sold with 1200 baud data on one side and 2400 baud
          >on the other.
          --------------------------------------------(stolen from some page somewhere)


          So, of course, the tones are obviously analog but they still were used in a
          binary manner.


          Zoz
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