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Re: [beam] Spring head (WAS: I hate 1381s)

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  • Ori
    *Wow, I messed up the image links :) Here is the message, corrected:* ... Hi Ben, ... Wow, thanks for catching that! I had to go and check the bot to make sure
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 2, 2003
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      *Wow, I messed up the image links :) Here is the message, corrected:*

      >> Hi Ori,

      Hi Ben,

      >
      > Are you sure that the FLED should be reverse biassed?

      Wow, thanks for catching that! I had to go and check the bot to make sure :)
      The corrected schematic of the FLED Laser Light Head is here: <
      http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/laser_lighthead.gif >

      I decided to post some pictures of the bot, as it is a bit more artistic
      than my bots usually are :) Now that winter is finally removing it's
      death-grips (Yesterday was above 0 degrees C!), I started thinking about
      spring, and took it rather literally. This bot has got a few springs on it,
      which makes the ornament very interesting, as they are always bouncing
      around.

      Because the springs are of different lengths and different spring
      coefficients, they all bounce at different frequencies. The interesting
      thing is, on different surfaces, different springs will be bouncing more
      than the rest, because they are resonating with the vibrations of the
      surface they are on.

      FRONT SHOT:
      < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/frontshot.JPG >
      Here, you can see the bot pretty clearly. I had to wait for over a minute
      for the springs to stop bouncing! The only reason it's still is that it is
      locked on. See that spring sticking out to your right? The flag on the end
      is made of the shiny auto trim that I mentioned a few weeks ago on the list.
      When that is bouncing (as it usually is), it projects rainbows on the walls
      that bounce all over the place. It's very nice.

      REAR SHOT:
      < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/rearshot.JPG >
      Here's what you would see looking from the back. I'm just noticing this
      now - the motor shaft attachment (a piece of brass tubing) has the shiny
      tape peeling off! It doesn't stick well to itself. I'll have to superglue
      that... Here you can see the springs nicely. There is a small spring
      sticking out to the left that is rather hard to see - the wire is very thin
      gauge. It bounces at a very high frequency, making a blur that is... OK...
      The spring with the blue heatshrink (sticking towards you) bounces the most.
      It's from a Mac floppy drive.

      FRONT CLOSEUP:
      < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/frontcloseup.JPG >
      Here you can see the electronics (a bit), the two deadband diodes, the
      photodiodes (a la Solarbotics) that are in proto board, the FLED (white
      heatshrink with a blue stripe), as well as the motor. This is one of the
      Nihon gearmotors that I pulled from a camcorder, mentioned in an earlier
      post. There's the pulley drive that goes from the motor itself to the
      gearbox.

      REAR CLOSEUP:
      < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/rearcloseup.JPG >
      Here you can see the electronics well. The LED is the superbright LED from
      Solarbotics, red. Man, is it ever bright, even from this solar bot! It
      blinks frequently when locked on, too. The cap (also with a stripe of that
      shiny auto trim... I love this stuff! :) is also from Solarbotics, 1000uF.
      It's the smallest type of 1000uF cap I've ever seen! Note how shiny the
      solar panel is - I rarely use a new solar panel on a bot, they are usually
      taken off another robot. This new panel, however, is perfect! The wires are
      superglued on, to prevent the pads from ripping off.

      THE BASE:
      < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/thebase.JPG >
      The base is made from REALLY old-style RAM. It's off an old '86 motherboard.
      It was all soldered together with a big, shiny blob in the centre,
      supporting the brass tubing, which is soldered to the motor shaft. I added
      that shiny auto trim onto each RAM chip. These pictures don't do justice to
      how much it shines! Walking into a room with this bot in it, before noticing
      the bouncing springs or the blinking lockon LED, you see the rainbows
      reflected from the base.

      Enjoy,

      Ori
    • Wilf Rigter
      On nice looking head! And those springs are designed to .... attract other heads? 8^) Any idea how efficient this design is when locked on? wilf ... From:
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2003
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        On nice looking head!  And those springs are designed to ....  attract other heads? 8^)
         
        Any idea how efficient this design is when locked on?
         
        wilf
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ori
        Sent: Sunday, February 02, 2003 9:34 AM
        Subject: Re: [beam] Spring head (WAS: I hate 1381s)

        *Wow, I messed up the image links :) Here is the message, corrected:*

        >> Hi Ori,

        Hi Ben,

        >
        > Are you sure that the FLED should be reverse biassed?

        Wow, thanks for catching that! I had to go and check the bot to make sure :)
        The corrected schematic of the FLED Laser Light Head is here: <
        http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/laser_lighthead.gif >

        I decided to post some pictures of the bot, as it is a bit more artistic
        than my bots usually are :) Now that winter is finally removing it's
        death-grips (Yesterday was above 0 degrees C!), I started thinking about
        spring, and took it rather literally. This bot has got a few springs on it,
        which makes the ornament very interesting, as they are always bouncing
        around.

        Because the springs are of different lengths and different spring
        coefficients, they all bounce at different frequencies. The interesting
        thing is, on different surfaces, different springs will be bouncing more
        than the rest, because they are resonating with the vibrations of the
        surface they are on.

        FRONT SHOT:
        < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/frontshot.JPG >
        Here, you can see the bot pretty clearly. I had to wait for over a minute
        for the springs to stop bouncing! The only reason it's still is that it is
        locked on. See that spring sticking out to your right? The flag on the end
        is made of the shiny auto trim that I mentioned a few weeks ago on the list.
        When that is bouncing (as it usually is), it projects rainbows on the walls
        that bounce all over the place. It's very nice.

        REAR SHOT:
        < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/rearshot.JPG >
        Here's what you would see looking from the back. I'm just noticing this
        now - the motor shaft attachment (a piece of brass tubing) has the shiny
        tape peeling off! It doesn't stick well to itself. I'll have to superglue
        that... Here you can see the springs nicely. There is a small spring
        sticking out to the left that is rather hard to see - the wire is very thin
        gauge. It bounces at a very high frequency, making a blur that is... OK...
        The spring with the blue heatshrink (sticking towards you) bounces the most.
        It's from a Mac floppy drive.

        FRONT CLOSEUP:
        < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/frontcloseup.JPG >
        Here you can see the electronics (a bit), the two deadband diodes, the
        photodiodes (a la Solarbotics) that are in proto board, the FLED (white
        heatshrink with a blue stripe), as well as the motor. This is one of the
        Nihon gearmotors that I pulled from a camcorder, mentioned in an earlier
        post. There's the pulley drive that goes from the motor itself to the
        gearbox.

        REAR CLOSEUP:
        < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/rearcloseup.JPG >
        Here you can see the electronics well. The LED is the superbright LED from
        Solarbotics, red. Man, is it ever bright, even from this solar bot! It
        blinks frequently when locked on, too. The cap (also with a stripe of that
        shiny auto trim... I love this stuff! :) is also from Solarbotics, 1000uF.
        It's the smallest type of 1000uF cap I've ever seen! Note how shiny the
        solar panel is - I rarely use a new solar panel on a bot, they are usually
        taken off another robot. This new panel, however, is perfect! The wires are
        superglued on, to prevent the pads from ripping off.

        THE BASE:
        < http://ori.solarbotics.net/Springhead/thebase.JPG >
        The base is made from REALLY old-style RAM. It's off an old '86 motherboard.
        It was all soldered together with a big, shiny blob in the centre,
        supporting the brass tubing, which is soldered to the motor shaft. I added
        that shiny auto trim onto each RAM chip. These pictures don't do justice to
        how much it shines! Walking into a room with this bot in it, before noticing
        the bouncing springs or the blinking lockon LED, you see the rainbows
        reflected from the base.

        Enjoy,

        Ori


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      • Ori
        ... other heads? 8^) Thanks Wilf! Yes... that s exactly why the springs are there... ;) ... What do you mean? When the head is locked on, it doesn t store any
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2003
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          >On nice looking head! And those springs are designed to .... attract
          other >heads? 8^)

          Thanks Wilf! Yes... that's exactly why the springs are there... ;)

          >Any idea how efficient this design is when locked on?

          What do you mean? When the head is locked on, it doesn't store any charge
          for a later head motion - it just dumps it all to the LED, but since the SE
          has such a small cap (1000uF), it fires frequently enough to make storage of
          a charge useless.

          The way it dumps the 1000uF cap into the LED makes for a pummer effect
          (which also involves dumping a 1000uF cap).

          Ori

          >wilf
        • Wilf Rigter
          Ah yes, so why not add bright reflecting plumage and an IR beacon. Allways wanted to see the interaction between a group of heads with IR emitters.
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 2, 2003
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            Ah yes, so why not add bright reflecting  plumage and an IR beacon.  Allways wanted to see the interaction between a group of heads with IR emitters.
             
            Efficient? well for example if a big part of the charge on the cap is dumped through the chip instead of the LED or the motors it would not be very efficient.
             
            wilf  
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ori
            Sent: Sunday, February 02, 2003 10:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [beam] Spring head (WAS: I hate 1381s)

            >On nice looking head!  And those springs are designed to ....  attract
            other >heads? 8^)

            Thanks Wilf! Yes... that's exactly why the springs are there... ;)

            >Any idea how efficient this design is when locked on?

            What do you mean? When the head is locked on, it doesn't store any charge
            for a later head motion - it just dumps it all to the LED, but since the SE
            has such a small cap (1000uF), it fires frequently enough to make storage of
            a charge useless.

            The way it dumps the 1000uF cap into the LED makes for a pummer effect
            (which also involves dumping a 1000uF cap).

            Ori

            >wilf


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