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RE: [beam] Robotics, and why a Lathe

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  • Sallis Jeremy
    Milford instruments make a cheap low tech 3-axis milling machine, that might be of interest to this thread. url attached. It would nice to see what accuracy
    Message 1 of 46 , Feb 1, 2002
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      Milford instruments make a cheap low tech 3-axis milling machine, that might
      be of interest to this thread.

      url attached. It would nice to see what accuracy can be achieved with this
      machine.

      As a programmer I like the way even CNC machines say "hello world".

      Jeremy
    • Danny Broers
      My dad s also a clock collector. He s got an amazing collection and fixes them all one by one. He recently bought a lathe as well and is now perfecting his
      Message 46 of 46 , Feb 4, 2002
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        My dad's also a clock collector. He's got an amazing collection and fixes
        them all one by one. He recently bought a lathe as well and is now
        perfecting his skills, before he attempts to make things for his repair
        work. Before he had to go to eastern europe to buy some parts that no
        longer existed over here.

        I have a vision: I see him making gearboxes for my bots..... ;-)

        Danny

        At 21:47 31/01/2002 +0000, you wrote:
        >A great-uncle of mine (now deceased) collected (and repaired) clocks
        >and watches and timepieces. His collection was incredible (and
        >incredibly valuable - he had pieces dating back to the middle ages,
        >Victorian pocket-watches with animated displays, grandfather clocks
        >with astronomical/orrery dials, clockwork music boxes that used
        >strings, drums, and pipes to play the song, clockwork figures and
        >moving, singing birds smaller than a jellybean, mechanical wonder
        >after mechanical wonder. The security system protecting the stuff was
        >also pretty impressive).
        >
        >Anyway, I only saw all this stuff once, but among other things, he
        >showed us how he made gears (for repairs). He used an antique
        >gear-cutter - the things that the clockmakers had used to make the
        >clocks.
        >Years later, in a museum, I saw a display of various tools and
        >oddities used 100 years ago. They weren't labeled (like seemingly all
        >museums, it provided lots of things to look at but only the most
        >superficial and basic information about anything on display), but I
        >knew what the various tools were used for. But what was that wierd
        >thing over there - OMG! An old-fashioned gear cutter! <insert strange
        >scene of young guy pressed up against the glass in a museum, like a
        >kind outside a candy store, drooling over this strange antique
        >contraption that few would even be able to work out it's purpose>
        >I still want one of those things, damnit.
        >
        >Headlines: "Museum smash-and-grab - only one item taken" :-)
        >
        >Where was I going with this? I can't remember. Ah well. Everyone
        >should have a great-uncle who has the most amazing collection of
        >clockwork. I heard the collection was broken up and sold after his
        >death, which saddens me.
        >
        >But yeah, I've had my eye on the dremel drill press a while. If I ever
        >find the free time to start work on a project, I'll definitely be
        >buying it...
        >
        >--- In beam@y..., "Ori" <sbarbut@s...> wrote:
        > > I've also got a Dremel tool, which is very useful. One thing that I
        >got
        > > about a year ago, that made everything better, is a Dremel tool
        >press. It
        > > basically holds your Dremel tool, and lets you use it as a drill
        >press. I
        > > often lower it, and just sand things with one of the many bits I
        >have for
        > > it. I asked my tech teacher about making gears on a lathe, and he
        >said that
        > > it's very complicated, and you need specialized tools for it. He
        >said that
        > > it's cheaper to just buy gears from a manufacturer.
        >
        >
        >
        >
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