Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [beam] solder paste

Expand Messages
  • GrantM
    Ahh but be careful what you solder with silver solder as it can anneal the metal your soldering, metals such as brass, bronze and copper tend to become very
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 3, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Ahh but be careful what you solder with silver solder as it can anneal the metal your soldering, metals such as brass, bronze and copper tend to become very soft if annealing temperature is reached. Note that I am talking about "real" silver solder and not the 2% kind at Canadian Tire.  A well done silver solder joint can be stronger than the metal around it.
       
      GrantM
       
      "We have enough youth now we need a fountain of smarts"
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 5:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste

      When I solder metal thing-me's I just use the ordinary electronics flux
      solder. If it really needs to be strong I use silver solder but that
      requires a higher temperature. Your iron must be big enough to supply that
      extra heat fast. I think it would be a good idea to take a jewelry making
      class at a junior college. You learn all kinds'a fabrication and casting
      techniques, including handling a torch.
      If you are making a walker I suggest silver solder. I've never tried paste.
      Someone else must help on that part.               John S.
    • GrantM
      They do sell tires but its more of a large hardware store they sell bicycles, solder, lightbulbs, car parts ect. Yes In the Jewlery class I took we used Med
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 3, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        They do sell tires but its more of a large hardware store they sell bicycles, solder, lightbulbs, car parts ect.
         Yes In the Jewlery class I took we used Med Silver Solder melting point of around 600 deg C, works great on stainless steel if you need a *really* strong solder joint.
         
        Still the 2% silver 98% tin solder still has its place, I could go on and on about soldering techniques I picked up but may save that for a page on solarbotics perhaps... most of the repair jobs we get in are just some soldering problems.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 6:37 PM
        Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste

        Yeah, I meant the 2% kind. Sometimes I put a tiny bit of regular solder to
        transfer heat then finish it with silver solder. This works ok for me on
        small wire and paperclip frames. In jewelry making class they have REAL
        silver solder that requires a VERY high temp to melt and you have to use a
        torch and it makes the copper in the brass come to the surface and...and... 
                                John S.

        Out of curiosity....is Canadian Tire a tire store or hardware store or
        something like Pep Boys with a little of everything?
      • laminar gerbil
        Yeah, I meant the 2% kind. Sometimes I put a tiny bit of regular solder to transfer heat then finish it with silver solder. This works ok for me on small wire
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 2, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Yeah, I meant the 2% kind. Sometimes I put a tiny bit of regular solder to
          transfer heat then finish it with silver solder. This works ok for me on
          small wire and paperclip frames. In jewelry making class they have REAL
          silver solder that requires a VERY high temp to melt and you have to use a
          torch and it makes the copper in the brass come to the surface and...and...
          John S.

          Out of curiosity....is Canadian Tire a tire store or hardware store or
          something like Pep Boys with a little of everything?

          >From: "GrantM" <gmbeam@...>
          >Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <beam@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste
          >Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2001 19:28:17 -0700
          >
          >Ahh but be careful what you solder with silver solder as it can anneal the
          >metal your soldering, metals such as brass, bronze and copper tend to
          >become very soft if annealing temperature is reached. Note that I am
          >talking about "real" silver solder and not the 2% kind at Canadian Tire. A
          >well done silver solder joint can be stronger than the metal around it.
          >
          >GrantM
          >
          >"We have enough youth now we need a fountain of smarts"
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: laminar gerbil
          > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 5:59 PM
          > Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste
          >
          >
          > When I solder metal thing-me's I just use the ordinary electronics flux
          > solder. If it really needs to be strong I use silver solder but that
          > requires a higher temperature. Your iron must be big enough to supply
          >that
          > extra heat fast. I think it would be a good idea to take a jewelry
          >making
          > class at a junior college. You learn all kinds'a fabrication and casting
          > techniques, including handling a torch.
          > If you are making a walker I suggest silver solder. I've never tried
          >paste.
          > Someone else must help on that part. John S.
          >


          _________________________________________________________________
          Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
        • laminar gerbil
          Because of the nature of motor construction it must turn SOME amount. The armature has to click over to some new position. In my own experiments, using a
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 3, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            Because of the nature of motor construction it must turn SOME amount.
            The armature has to click over to some new position. In my own experiments,
            using a smaller capacitor (lower uF rating)does cause the motor to fire more
            often but not turn as much each pop. If you add a drive system then friction
            goes up and the motor must overcome it. So, you "tune" your vehicle by
            trying increasing cap sizes until it starts to move. If you want it to go up
            an incline or climb an obstacle it will need a bigger cap than that. This is
            one of the neatest parts of beam robots, the experimenting and testing.
            Anyway, as you keep increasing cap size it takes longer to charge. I
            personally prefer short charges and pops because at least it's moving.
            You could let it charge 10 minutes and then it runs for 10 seconds but
            that does not impress your friends.
            I've been interested in hooking up multiple solar engines firing in
            sequence to make it run more.
            Gotta go. John S.


            >From: atari@...
            >Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
            >To: beam@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [beam] Better torque out of pager motors?
            >Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 04:00:56 -0000

            I'm not really
            >concerned on how much/far it moves per firing, as much as just taking
            >small steps. I had even wondered about a almost constantly moving,
            >although very slow, bot that fires quickly, but barely moves each
            >firing.

            _________________________________________________________________
            Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
          • David Simmons
            Pep Boys, a little bit of everything but not always what you want!!! ... From: laminar gerbil To: Sent:
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 3, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              Pep Boys, a little bit of everything but not always what you want!!!

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: laminar gerbil <laminargerbil@...>
              To: <beam@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 8:37 PM
              Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste


              > Yeah, I meant the 2% kind. Sometimes I put a tiny bit of regular solder to
              > transfer heat then finish it with silver solder. This works ok for me on
              > small wire and paperclip frames. In jewelry making class they have REAL
              > silver solder that requires a VERY high temp to melt and you have to use a
              > torch and it makes the copper in the brass come to the surface
              and...and...
              > John S.
              >
              > Out of curiosity....is Canadian Tire a tire store or hardware store or
              > something like Pep Boys with a little of everything?
              >
              > >From: "GrantM" <gmbeam@...>
              > >Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
              > >To: <beam@yahoogroups.com>
              > >Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste
              > >Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2001 19:28:17 -0700
              > >
              > >Ahh but be careful what you solder with silver solder as it can anneal
              the
              > >metal your soldering, metals such as brass, bronze and copper tend to
              > >become very soft if annealing temperature is reached. Note that I am
              > >talking about "real" silver solder and not the 2% kind at Canadian Tire.
              A
              > >well done silver solder joint can be stronger than the metal around it.
              > >
              > >GrantM
              > >
              > >"We have enough youth now we need a fountain of smarts"
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: laminar gerbil
              > > To: beam@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 5:59 PM
              > > Subject: Re: [beam] solder paste
              > >
              > >
              > > When I solder metal thing-me's I just use the ordinary electronics
              flux
              > > solder. If it really needs to be strong I use silver solder but that
              > > requires a higher temperature. Your iron must be big enough to supply
              > >that
              > > extra heat fast. I think it would be a good idea to take a jewelry
              > >making
              > > class at a junior college. You learn all kinds'a fabrication and
              casting
              > > techniques, including handling a torch.
              > > If you are making a walker I suggest silver solder. I've never tried
              > >paste.
              > > Someone else must help on that part. John S.
              > >
              >
              >
              > _________________________________________________________________
              > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.