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RE: [beam] sliding thingy...

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  • John Simmons
    As you probably guess by now, shifting weight is allowed as long as something is sliding. If that helps -that- surface grip better while the other one moves
    Message 1 of 30 , Apr 30, 2001
      As you probably guess by now, shifting weight is allowed as long as
      something is sliding. If that helps -that- surface grip better while the
      other one moves then you probably need weight shifting.
      John S.


      >From: "Cory Houck" <Riven280@...>
      >Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
      >To: beam@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: RE: [beam] sliding thingy...
      >Date: Fri, 27 Apr 2001 16:21:33 -0400
      >
      >i think you should be able to shift wieght...
      >
      >
      > >From: "Tom Mairs" <tmairs@...>
      > >Reply-To: beam@yahoogroups.com
      > >To: <beam@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Subject: RE: [beam] sliding thingy...
      > >Date: Fri, 27 Apr 2001 10:14:25 -0700
      > >
      > >Exactly my point. I can understand the concept of sliding the lighter
      >part
      > >of the bot, but then what? - How do you get the heavier end to slide
      > >forward
      > >without shifting weight, or otherwise securing the first part with some
      > >type
      > >of claw ? all you really have here is a stationary floor polisher.
      > >
      > >Tom Mairs tmairs@...
      > >Aasland Technologies http://www.aasland.com/ - Complete IT services and
      > >Network Support -
      > >http://www.mairs.org/ - Machines, Artificial Intelligence, and Robotic
      > >Systems
      > >
      > >
      > >-----Original Message-----
      > >From: Sallis, Jeremy [mailto:jsallis@...]
      > >Sent: Friday, April 27, 2001 10:00 AM
      > >To: 'beam@yahoogroups.com'
      > >Subject: RE: [beam] sliding thingy...
      > >
      > > >If you are not allowed to shift weight, and you are not allowed to
      > >ratchet,
      > > >and you are not allowed to lift/pull, there are very few options left.
      > >
      > >As I see it this restricts a slider to one that moves a small part of its
      > >body at a time and relies on the static friction from the bulk of the
      >mass
      > >to keep that part stationary while the smaller part moves. Like Bruce's
      > >idea
      > >(I think). I'm not sure that sloping bristles or teeth meet the criteria
      >of
      > >not lifting when they move forward because individually they bend up when
      > >they come across irregularities in the surface below.
      > >
      > >I tried to model a slider with 3 equal masses in a row linked by
      >extending
      > >and contracting rods in sodaplay, but this just demonstrated the
      > >limitations
      > >of the friction model in sodaplay.
      > >
      > >Jeremy
      > >
      > >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > >beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      >
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    • Tyson B.
      the only true slider by exact definition (no shifting of wieght, to lifting of body parts, no ratcheting wheels, no rolling, etc.) possible that i can think
      Message 2 of 30 , May 5 9:13 PM
        the only true 'slider' by exact definition (no shifting of wieght, to lifting of body parts, no
        ratcheting wheels, no rolling, etc.) possible that i can think of would be a flat-bottomed, very
        light robot with a teflon (or other low-drag material) coated bttom, moved along by a fan.

        --- Tom Mairs <tmairs@...> wrote:
        > Exactly my point. I can understand the concept of sliding the lighter part
        > of the bot, but then what? - How do you get the heavier end to slide forward
        > without shifting weight, or otherwise securing the first part with some type
        > of claw ? all you really have here is a stationary floor polisher.
        >
        > Tom Mairs tmairs@...
        > Aasland Technologies http://www.aasland.com/ - Complete IT services and
        > Network Support -
        > http://www.mairs.org/ - Machines, Artificial Intelligence, and Robotic
        > Systems
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Sallis, Jeremy [mailto:jsallis@...]
        > Sent: Friday, April 27, 2001 10:00 AM
        > To: 'beam@yahoogroups.com'
        > Subject: RE: [beam] sliding thingy...
        >
        > >If you are not allowed to shift weight, and you are not allowed to ratchet,
        > >and you are not allowed to lift/pull, there are very few options left.
        >
        > As I see it this restricts a slider to one that moves a small part of its
        > body at a time and relies on the static friction from the bulk of the mass
        > to keep that part stationary while the smaller part moves. Like Bruce's idea
        > (I think). I'm not sure that sloping bristles or teeth meet the criteria of
        > not lifting when they move forward because individually they bend up when
        > they come across irregularities in the surface below.
        >
        > I tried to model a slider with 3 equal masses in a row linked by extending
        > and contracting rods in sodaplay, but this just demonstrated the limitations
        > of the friction model in sodaplay.
        >
        > Jeremy
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > beam-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >


        =====
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      • Bruce Robinson
        ... The original slider that started this whole thing uses the physics of static friction. No weight shifting, no lifting, no grasping, no wheels, no fans :)
        Message 3 of 30 , May 5 11:51 PM
          "Tyson B." wrote:
          >
          > the only true 'slider' by exact definition (no shifting of wieght,
          > to lifting of body parts, no ratcheting wheels, no rolling, etc.)
          > possible that i can think of would be a flat-bottomed, very
          > light robot with a teflon (or other low-drag material) coated bttom,
          > moved along by a fan.

          The original slider that started this whole thing uses the physics of
          static friction. No weight shifting, no lifting, no grasping, no wheels,
          no fans :) See my previous note ...

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beam/message/13888

          Bruce
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