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Re: H16 Gudgeon repair - looking for options

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  • jv1234_99
    Sue: There are some fairly complete discussions of this problem on the hobiecat.com and/or catsailor.com forums...complete with links to good pix. Search
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Sue: There are some fairly complete discussions of this problem on the hobiecat.com and/or catsailor.com forums...complete with links to good pix. Search those for detail. (Sorry, but I can't right now!) There are endless recommendations on drilling. Here's some other stuff I remember...

      It sound like your screws broke right at the aluminum plate which is glassed into the inside of the transom. The soft aluminum plate will make drilling the stainless screw cleanly that much more important. Dissimilar metal corrosion often causes seizure/failure of the srcrews. Once fixed, it's a good idea to run 'em out, coat 'em, and reseal every few years.

      If only a couple of the screws are "screwed" you might be able to get by with the newer one piece gudgeons. They have an extra set of holes that will require tapping the transom. Beware that (previously, at least) the one-piece gudgeons come from Hobie Europe, and the holes dont align exactly right on US boats. The holes in the gudgeon must be reamed a little. One person was reportably able to offset the one-piece gudgeon a little, tap all new holes, and make up the tow difference with the tiller crossbar adjustment.

      The stock screws are #12 (at least on older boats). If a hole is stripped (or not completely fubarred by drilling) it can be upsized slightly with a 1/4 inch tap. (You should be able to get 1/4 inch stainless screws at your local hardware store, unlike #12s).

      Beyond the gudgeon repair, I'd spend some more time looking for the root of this problem. Something must be really wrong with the rudder kick-up or the new screws themselves to shear one year old screws.

      Hope this helps some.

      Jerome Vaughan
      Hobie 16
      Clinton, Mississippi


      --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Todd Elozory <todd.sam@...> wrote:
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      > Sue,
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      > Harbor Freight has a remote camera for inspections.
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      > http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=66550
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      > But even if you can see the other end of the ss screw, you still can't access it.
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      > To drill out ss you will need a left handed cobalt drill bit. Your chance of success is minimal. Cutting the surrounding fiber glass out and reinforcing the transom is probably the right way to go, (IMHO).
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      > Good luck!
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      > Todd Elozory
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      > H21SE
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      > Thonotosassa, Florida
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      > To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
      > From: wind_lass@...
      > Date: Thu, 28 May 2009 22:38:30 +0000
      > Subject: [beachcats] H16 Gudgeon repair - looking for options
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      > A friend dropped off his H16 for repairs after having a bit too much fun on Lake Erie last weekend.
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      > As background, this boat has always had issues with the gudgeon bolts coming loose, so last year we installed the special SS locking screws (catalog pg 20).
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      > Well, the darn screws work! Don't know exactly what happened but the lower starboard gudgeon pulled completely out of the transom, breaking off the screws about 1/2" below the fiberglass surface. Hobie in CA suggested that the remaining screw parts be drilled out. Sounds good in theory, but that would be working blind (1/2" down into this screw hole), trying to drill hard SS that is surrounded by soft fiberglass and a soft aluminum backing plate.
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      > I'm looking to see if anyone has run into anything like this, and if so, what did you do? Figured there might be some trick to this that would make it a lot less risky.
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      > For what it's worth, we have good access to tools, and fiberglass work, although not desirable, is also an option. Also, boat has no inspection ports.
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      > -Sue
      > H16/H18
      > Lake Erie
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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    • gevoniuk
      I had similar issues with my H16 following an unplanned encounter with a jetty (long story). I had my gudgeon screws break off just below the transom surface.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 2, 2009
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        I had similar issues with my H16 following an unplanned encounter with a jetty (long story). I had my gudgeon screws break off just below the transom surface. To get them out, I had to remove enough of the surface gel-coat/glass to get vice grips in there to grab and unscrew the stubs. You can do this with a dremel tool or even a drill (you're going to have to repair the glass anyway). If that doesn't work, you may be able to unscrew them from the inside (I had cut access holes anyway).

        Before I installed inspection ports, rather than rely on the aluminum plate threading (I had already had them strip out twice), I through bolted (stainless steel!) with nuts on the inside of the hulls, using large washers to act as a backing plate. I used the new style European gudgeons, which as someone pointed out, have slightly different hole spacing. Before installing them, I repaired the glass damage I had done and filled in the old screw holes. For good measure I added a layer of glass/resin on the inside of the hulls, and the outside, followed by touch-up paint (EasyPoxy). These repairs have held up well for a couple of years.

        The inspection ports make a huge difference in your ability to access the area and there is no way you can through-bolt (highly recommended) without them.

        One final word on through bolting. Be very careful handling the nuts inside the hulls. If you drop one, the curve of the hulls will result in the nut rolling way out of reach inside the hulls. Don't ask me how I know this.

        GaryE
        H16


        --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "jv1234_99" <jv1234_99@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sue: There are some fairly complete discussions of this problem on the hobiecat.com and/or catsailor.com forums...complete with links to good pix. Search those for detail. (Sorry, but I can't right now!) There are endless recommendations on drilling. Here's some other stuff I remember...
        >
        > It sound like your screws broke right at the aluminum plate which is glassed into the inside of the transom. The soft aluminum plate will make drilling the stainless screw cleanly that much more important. Dissimilar metal corrosion often causes seizure/failure of the srcrews. Once fixed, it's a good idea to run 'em out, coat 'em, and reseal every few years...
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