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Re: How to reef a main in a Hobie Cat 16

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  • tamishel
    First, I don t believe you can reef an H16 on the water, because the halyard hook is forward on the mast. I never could figure it, anyway, and often wondered
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1 6:36 AM
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      First, I don't believe you can reef an H16 on the water, because the halyard hook is forward
      on the mast. I never could figure it, anyway, and often wondered how I could rig an after
      mounted halyard hook so I could reef on the water, from the trampoline.

      So, anyway:

      Haul the mainsail up to the reefing height halyard slug. (or drop it to that point, if the sail's
      already up.)

      Hook the downhaul into the uppermost tack grommet (the reefing point tack grommet.)

      Flake/tidy the sail along the boom. Have bits of line through the reefing point grommets
      along what is now the foot of the sail, and tie the sail to the boom, snugly.

      Move the outhaul to the reefing clew point, and haul hard on the outhaul, to flatten the foot.

      Downhaul hard to flatten/depower, and go sailing.
    • Todd Elozory
      Marco, If you are on the water and the circumstances call for reefing, you are in for a difficult task. Tami is right, the halyard is forward, not in the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 1 1:25 PM
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        Marco,

        If you are on the water and the circumstances call for reefing, you are
        in for a difficult task.

        Tami is right, the halyard is forward, not in the easiest position on
        the water, worse if your circumstances have you thinking about reefing.
        Depower the sails by furling the jib, and releasing the traveler and
        sheet first, if you feel you still need to reef the main, you are going
        to need a good crew... maybe you can flip over and ride out the storm on
        the underside.

        Reefing before you head out, maybe you shouldn't be heading out...

        Todd Elozory
        H21SE
        Thonotosassa, Florida



        -----Original Message-----
        From: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:beachcats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mscussat
        Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 3:36 PM
        To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [beachcats] How to reef a main in a Hobie Cat 16



        Hi,

        good morning. Despite I have been sailing my HC 16 for several
        years I
        have never reefed the main. Yesterday I was looking at the sail
        and I
        was thinking that I am not 100% confident I know how to reef it
        correcly.
        My boat is pretty and so mail can be locked at the right height
        using
        the halyard hook.

        Do I need to use the standard CLEW of do I need to use the last
        rear
        reefing grummet as CLEW when the sail is REEFED?

        Perhaps do you have any picture/guide to be used as reference?
        Thanks,

        Marco







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • tamishel
        Here s a link to a vid of Stars and Stripes gettin it under reef: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSGViue46f8 Good shot along the boom, although less than tidy
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 2 6:06 AM
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          Here's a link to a vid of Stars and Stripes gettin' it under reef:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSGViue46f8

          Good shot along the boom, although less than tidy ;-)

          I disagree with Elozory. Reefing allows one to go out relatively safely in conditions one might
          not otherwise consider, and is often faster than depowering. By this I mean that if one
          continues to carry sail in a blow, one will be steering and dumping. Whereat if one just took
          a reef, one can continue actually concentrating on sailing.

          It seems foolish to me that the 'modern' cats have discontinued installing reef points in
          mainsails. Reefing is part of seamanship... just ask the badasses sailing places like the Solent,
          f'rinstance.
        • sueh16h18
          I totally agree with the foolishness of eliminating reef points. Knowing how much canvas to have aloft is a part of seamanship, as stated below. On our
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 7 5:12 AM
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            I totally agree with the foolishness of eliminating reef points.
            Knowing how much canvas to have aloft is a part of seamanship, as
            stated below. On our monohull, we have THREE reef points. It may
            be foolish to be out in those conditions, but if you find yourself
            there, better to be prepared.

            On a H16, you can not furl the jib, which is a disadvantage. We have
            found that the boat is rather underpowered with a reef, and tends to
            wallow over the waves rather than skim the tops like you are used
            to. But when conditions call for a reef, this is preferable to
            constant (and tiring) capsizing and attempting to re-right the
            boat. Been there. Was not happy.

            Never figured aout how to reef on the water. Better to reef first
            and come back to shore to shake it out if you discover you don't
            need it.

            -Sue
            (H16 busted on Lake Erie in surprise 40 mph gusts... with a reef)


            --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "tamishel" <tamishel@...> wrote:
            >
            > Here's a link to a vid of Stars and Stripes gettin' it under reef:
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSGViue46f8
            >
            > Good shot along the boom, although less than tidy ;-)
            >
            > I disagree with Elozory. Reefing allows one to go out relatively
            safely in conditions one might
            > not otherwise consider, and is often faster than depowering. By
            this I mean that if one
            > continues to carry sail in a blow, one will be steering and
            dumping. Whereat if one just took
            > a reef, one can continue actually concentrating on sailing.
            >
            > It seems foolish to me that the 'modern' cats have discontinued
            installing reef points in
            > mainsails. Reefing is part of seamanship... just ask the badasses
            sailing places like the Solent,
            > f'rinstance.
            >
          • Victor the Cleaner
            ... All sound points, of course. Way back when I got the Mystere 17, I figured on adding a furler for heavy air. But after sailing it a few times without the
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 7 9:02 AM
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              "sueh16h18" wind_lass@... convincingly argued:

              > I totally agree with the foolishness of eliminating reef points.
              > Knowing how much canvas to have aloft is a part of seamanship, as
              > stated below. On our monohull, we have THREE reef points. It may
              > be foolish to be out in those conditions, but if you find yourself
              > there, better to be prepared.
              >
              > On a H16, you can not furl the jib, which is a disadvantage. We have
              > found that the boat is rather underpowered with a reef, and tends to
              > wallow over the waves rather than skim the tops like you are used
              > to. But when conditions call for a reef, this is preferable to
              > constant (and tiring) capsizing and attempting to re-right the
              > boat. Been there. Was not happy.
              >
              > Never figured aout how to reef on the water. Better to reef first
              > and come back to shore to shake it out if you discover you don't
              > need it.

              All sound points, of course. Way back when I got the Mystere 17,
              I figured on adding a furler for heavy air. But after sailing it a
              few times without the jib, I abandoned the idea - just too damn hard
              to tack without it. So I accepted that with that boat it would be
              all-or-nothing, and never bothered to think about reef points. I
              suppose it would be nice to have the option of reefing, but as it was
              I learned where my limits are and how hard I can push on the edge.
              I think I've come out better for it.

              Jonathan
            • Paul
              H16 reefing with a comp tip mast. If you have a sail with reefing points or have had added gromets and reinforcements for reefing. Problem is that the sail
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 7 10:15 AM
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                H16 reefing with a comp tip mast.
                If you have a sail with reefing points
                or have had added gromets and reinforcements for reefing.

                Problem is that the sail pulls out of the plastic part of the mast,
                and there is no reefing stop on the comptip halyard.

                After raising the sail and making your reef tie to the boom,
                you will need to point the boat into the wind on the beach,
                and use the trapeze handle to lay the boat on it's side, and
                bring the mast tip to the ground.

                You will need an additional line.
                Tie it with a bowline through the head of the sail (short loop).
                Wrap it around the mast, then through the bowline loop, and
                run it up the mast and tie it around the mast again above
                the halyard clip. Then right the boat and secure the downhaul.

                (if you are real tricky you can figure out a slip knot for the second
                tie around the mast and tie the end to the halyard so that you can
                release the sail and avoid laying the mast down a second time
                when you lower the sail. I haven't got this part to work
                satifactorially 100% yet.)

                Takes about the same amount of extra effort that it takes to right a
                capsize on a gusty day, but you don't get wet. Performance doesn't
                suffer much since you weren't going to use all that wind anyway. I
                even overtook another H16 on such a day because he was busy sheeting
                out to dump the gusts.
              • gevoniuk
                One more voice of agreement on this. I had reefing points added to my new Hobie sail and always carry a reefing line with me as standard safety equipment. It
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 8 9:04 AM
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                  One more voice of agreement on this. I had reefing points added to my
                  new Hobie sail and always carry a reefing line with me as standard
                  safety equipment. It definitely slows the boat down, but allows me to
                  focus on sailing it rather than constantly focusing on dumping wind
                  during the gusts and sailing defensively.

                  As already noted, it's not really practical to reef while on the water -
                  I guess in theory that if you have planned ahead and haven't hooked
                  the main halyard on the top stop you could ease the halyard down to the
                  reefing stop while out on the water - but this is not something I would
                  be very eager to try - especially under the conditions where this is
                  apt to occur.

                  Reefing ain't foolproof e.g. I have pp'd while reefed. The wallpaper
                  on my PC is a shot of me and my nephew reefed and double trapped on a
                  screaming reach, throwing off a wake that looks like a motor boat.
                  Microseconds later we were in the water wondering WTF?

                  GaryE
                  H16
                  Durham, NC


                  --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "sueh16h18" <wind_lass@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I totally agree with the foolishness of eliminating reef points.
                  > Knowing how much canvas to have aloft is a part of seamanship, as
                  > stated below. ...
                • Damian Hamill
                  ... That easy to explain - you were posing for the camera and took your eye off the leeward bow :-) I never reefed - I could handle up to a force 6 with the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 8 9:33 PM
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                    On Tue, Jul 8, 2008 at 11:04 PM, gevoniuk <gevoniuk@...> wrote:

                    > Reefing ain't foolproof e.g. I have pp'd while reefed. The wallpaper
                    > on my PC is a shot of me and my nephew reefed and double trapped on a
                    > screaming reach, throwing off a wake that looks like a motor boat.
                    > Microseconds later we were in the water wondering WTF?
                    >
                    > GaryE
                    > H16
                    > Durham, NC

                    That easy to explain - you were posing for the camera and took your
                    eye off the leeward bow :-)

                    I never reefed - I could handle up to a force 6 with the right crew
                    and have a real blast - it was sailing on the edge but that what makes
                    the H16 so much fun.

                    If it was above a force 6 I didnt go out but it also depends on where
                    the wind is coming from. Steady offshore winds are easier to handle.

                    An oncoming squall would be accompanied by an increase in wind speed,
                    shifts and gusts but you can see it coming so you have time to get
                    back to shore if need be.

                    regards
                    damian
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