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Re: Righting pole

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  • Brad
    Hi All, righting the boat is fun- even if you read the hobie 16 suggestions from hobie to right the boat, and dive over to the far hulls to climb aboard to
    Message 1 of 24 , Dec 1, 2007
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      Hi All,

      righting the boat is fun- even if you read the hobie 16 suggestions
      from hobie to right the boat, and dive over to the far hulls to climb
      aboard to keep it from flipping the other way- to me it sounds a bit
      funny- I've had reasonable success with starting with the bows
      pointed into the wind- and each set of conditions (waves, wind,
      current) will create new challenges for you to overcome. In the 1992
      Formosa Hobie Challenge several of us opted out of sailing on one of
      the days (high winds, wave conditions) from the Northern tip of
      Formosa (Taiwan) to Green Bay (Fay Tsui Won). I think 3 or 4 teams
      tried it, and only the Aussies ended up on the Rocks wreaking the
      boat. Once they flipped it, every time they righted it, the winds
      immediatly knocked it back over, They were not injured, just stepped
      onshore at the right time.
      -the other teams started with a Reef on the Main, which they took out
      later. I stayed onshore with Jurgen (my team mate on the Texas boat)

      Best Regard,
      Brad A. (fmrH16, Gcat5.0)

      My suggestion for the 180lb folks, take CREW with you- introduce new
      people to sailing and it will make it easier to right the boat

      --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Mars DeLapp <jmd.MailList@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Buzz wrote:
      > > Bill with the wind blowing 15-20 mph you don't want to point the
      mast
      > > into the wind when capsized. If you do right the boat it will
      either
      > > cartwheel or take off with or without you. You should point the
      bows
      > > into the wind in these conditions.
      > > Buzz
      >
      > My experience is that it is impossible to keep the bows pointed
      into the wind when the wind is up. You can get the bows
      > pointed into the wind to start righting, but as soon as you move
      your weight back to the center of the boat and start
      > hiking out on the righting rope, the sails dragging in the water
      and the wind blowing on the hulls and tramp will
      > quickly turn the boat to have the mast pointed back into the wind.
      >
      > What you can do is, as the boat starts coming up, quickly shift
      your weight to the front of the boat. This will cause
      > the boat to turn into the wind as soon as the sails are out of the
      water. Then grab the dolphin striker as the hulls
      > come down and hang on to keep the boat from cartwheeling.
      >
      > And of course make sure your sails are uncleated before righting.
      >
      > --
      > Mars DeLapp
      > H18 without wings, Fleet 48
      > Placitas NM
      > http://www.HobieFleet48.org
      >
      > Protect your digital freedom and privacy, eliminate DRM, learn more
      at
      > http://www.defectivebydesign.org/what_is_drm
      >
    • newdlhead@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/1/2007 1:12:09 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... I had wanted to take a friend to start, but am concerned my greenness will trip the boat up,
      Message 2 of 24 , Dec 1, 2007
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        In a message dated 12/1/2007 1:12:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        talltexan2@... writes:

        > My suggestion for the 180lb folks, take CREW with you- introduce new
        > people to sailing and it will make it easier to right the boat

        I had wanted to take a friend to start, but am concerned my greenness will
        trip the boat up, and I don't want to subject anyone to that. I figured I'd wait
        till I could keep it upright for a duration. Doesn't matter, I didn't get it
        in the water yet, but we'll see how I do in the spring.
        I haven't flipped any of the Hobie waves I have rented out there, so I hope I
        am not 'in for it'.


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      • jv1234_99
        Talmadge: Here s a link to some righting pole albums on thebeachcats in case you haven t seen em:
        Message 3 of 24 , Dec 3, 2007
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          Talmadge: Here's a link to some righting pole albums on thebeachcats
          in case you haven't seen 'em:

          http://www.thebeachcats.com/index.php?module=pictures&g2_itemId=35080

          I hear windsurfer masts work well, and I have a friend who used a
          boom/gooseneck from a Lido 14. He filed on the gooseneck slide a
          little, and it fit right into the tramp track of the main beam under
          the mast of his H-16. His is typical with fore and aft lines to
          stabilize it and a height adjustable line in the middle that
          actually takes most of the weight. It's the kind you hang from, not
          stand on. I'm guessing it's ~8 ft long as it sticks out a foot or
          so past the rear beam when stowed. All that said, it was not
          sufficient for he and his wife (~255 lb. combined) to right the H-16
          in zero wind (even with mast sealed, sheets loose, etc.). He and I
          (~330 lb.) could pop it right up.

          Personally, I don't like his pole because it makes a hard spot under
          the tramp, interferes with stowing cooler, dry bag, etc. on the
          center lacing, and causes some drag in bigger waves. (Yes I'm very
          picky about drag, and I just knowingly wrote about my friend's hard
          pole and his tramp.) I use the large Murrays bag w/3:1 purchase and
          cam cleat. It's a huge PITA, and it's expensive....but it works.
          I'm ~5' 7" and ~175 lbs., and can right solo with no wind to help.

          I know you already know this, but......Whatever system is used
          should be practiced with/tested before it's really needed. I've
          assumed zero wind help is worst-case, but that may not be true. As
          stated in other posts above, every different wind/wave/weight
          scenario seems to have it's particular challenges. I've capsized in
          the Gulf when I was sure there was enough wind to right solo w/o the
          bag or anything, but I just couldn't do it. I think that the main
          problem was the waves making it impossible to properly position the
          bow in order to get help from the wind.

          Please let us know how your project goes and how the pole performs
          if you go ahead with it.

          Hope this helps some.

          Jerome Vaughan
          Hobie 16
          Clinton, Mi'sippi


          --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, stcbaker@... wrote:
          >
          > Months ago righting poles were discussed. Does any one have plans
          or
          > pictures of something that would work on a H-16 ? Im 5-8 200 lbs
          and have no luck in
          > RIGHTING THE BOAT > SORRY ABOUT THE CAPITAL LETTERS I THING MY
          COMPUTER
          > JUST BLEW UP> TALMADGE
          >
          >
          >
          > **************************************Check out AOL's list of
          2007's hottest
          > products.
          > (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?
          NCID=aoltop00030000000001)
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • stcbaker@aol.com
          Thanks Jerome . I went turtle the first time i took out this boat . I had moved up from a h-14. I had to get help from a pontoon boat to get it righted. I
          Message 4 of 24 , Dec 3, 2007
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            Thanks Jerome . I went turtle the first time i took out this boat . I had
            moved up from a h-14. I had to get help from a pontoon boat to get it righted.
            I immediately put a hobie bob on the mast and installed 6 to 1 harken
            blocks. The old sea way would' nt release that's why i went over. So on a day with
            no wind my friend and i took it out , turned it over and tried to right it.
            With ropes on each corner of the tramp frame our combined 400lbs had trouble.
            We found the easiest way to get it on its feet was to use the main halyard.
            I havent went over since but in a hard gust and no boats hardly on a lake
            that is drying out fast, the worry takes away from the fun. Lake Wylie in Rock
            Hill S.C. has had all the public boat landings closed because of low water.I
            have mast up . beach storage at a local yacht club which i think is cheap at
            480.00 per year. That's with club house and showers. Thanks for the help .
            ill check out these sights. Talmadge



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          • Bill
            One of the advantages of sailing on the shallow NJ Bays, you can not turtle in 6 of water. Go out the inlet and you need to go over 2 miles offshore to find
            Message 5 of 24 , Dec 4, 2007
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              One of the advantages of sailing on the shallow NJ Bays, you can not
              turtle in 6' of water.


              Go out the inlet and you need to go over 2 miles offshore to find
              water that is over 20' and sometime more then 4 miles.


              -- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, stcbaker@... wrote:
              >
              > Thanks Jerome . I went turtle the first time i took out this boat .
              I had
              > moved up from a h-14. I had to get help from a pontoon boat to get
              it righted.
              > I immediately put a hobie bob on the mast and installed 6 to 1
              harken
              > blocks. The old sea way would' nt release that's why i went over.
              So on a day with
              > no wind my friend and i took it out , turned it over and tried to
              right it.
              > With ropes on each corner of the tramp frame our combined 400lbs
              had trouble.
              > We found the easiest way to get it on its feet was to use the
              main halyard.
              > I havent went over since but in a hard gust and no boats hardly on
              a lake
              > that is drying out fast, the worry takes away from the fun. Lake
              Wylie in Rock
              > Hill S.C. has had all the public boat landings closed because of
              low water.I
              > have mast up . beach storage at a local yacht club which i think
              is cheap at
              > 480.00 per year. That's with club house and showers. Thanks for
              the help .
              > ill check out these sights. Talmadge
              >
              >
              >
              > **************************************Check out AOL's list of
              2007's hottest
              > products.
              > (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?
              NCID=aoltop00030000000001)
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • TrtlDave@aol.com
              I always check my blocks & make sure?I can uncleat them before taking my boat out. You can adjust the angle of the cleat lock, and determine what?you need do
              Message 6 of 24 , Dec 4, 2007
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                I always check my blocks & make sure?I can uncleat them before taking my boat out.
                You can adjust the angle of the cleat lock, and determine what?you need do to release it before the
                final panic flip of the wrist. Or maybe head up and let the air out of your sails.? In heavy weather or gusty winds, I have my main uncleated and watch for wind shifts anyway.??The old American made?SeaWay blocks on my jib work as good as any.
                It is always a good idea to check out all the blocks, pins, shrouds & equipment when you are taking a boat out for the first time anyway.
                TrtlDave

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Bill <b_cash_98@...>
                To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 12:50 pm
                Subject: [beachcats] Re: Righting pole






                One of the advantages of sailing on the shallow NJ Bays, you can not
                turtle in 6' of water.

                Go out the inlet and you need to go over 2 miles offshore to find
                water that is over 20' and sometime more then 4 miles.

                -- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, stcbaker@... wrote:
                >
                > Thanks Jerome . I went turtle the first time i took out this boat .
                I had
                > moved up from a h-14. I had to get help from a pontoon boat to get
                it righted.
                > I immediately put a hobie bob on the mast and installed 6 to 1
                harken
                > blocks. The old sea way would' nt release that's why i went over.
                So on a day with
                > no wind my friend and i took it out , turned it over and tried to
                right it.
                > With ropes on each corner of the tramp frame our combined 400lbs
                had trouble.
                > We found the easiest way to get it on its feet was to use the
                main halyard.
                > I havent went over since but in a hard gust and no boats hardly on
                a lake
                > that is drying out fast, the worry takes away from the fun. Lake
                Wylie in Rock
                > Hill S.C. has had all the public boat landings closed because of
                low water.I
                > have mast up . beach storage at a local yacht club which i think
                is cheap at
                > 480.00 per year. That's with club house and showers. Thanks for
                the help .
                > ill check out these sights. Talmadge
                >
                >
                >
                > **************************************Check out AOL's list of
                2007's hottest
                > products.
                > (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?
                NCID=aoltop00030000000001)
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >





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              • stcbaker@aol.com
                The harken blocks work perfect. Im glad i changed .Talmadge **************************************Check out AOL s list of 2007 s hottest products.
                Message 7 of 24 , Dec 5, 2007
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                  The harken blocks work perfect. Im glad i changed .Talmadge



                  **************************************Check out AOL's list of 2007's hottest
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                • jv1234_99
                  ... had trouble. Talmadge: This doesn t sound right. My 13 year old daughter and I (combined ~290 lbs.) can right my H-16 fairly easily. Have you checked to
                  Message 8 of 24 , Dec 6, 2007
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                    --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, stcbaker@... wrote:
                    >

                    > With ropes on each corner of the tramp frame our combined 400lbs
                    had trouble.


                    Talmadge: This doesn't sound right. My 13 year old daughter and I
                    (combined ~290 lbs.) can right my H-16 fairly easily. Have you
                    checked to make sure your mast is sealed? Even with the Bob, if
                    you've got some water out at the end of a 26'+ moment arm, the
                    additional righting force needed is significant. Also, does your
                    righting line allow you to lean way out and down (just above the
                    water)?

                    A couple of other related observations.....

                    After going through several options, I've come to the conclusion
                    that a single, thick (1/2 in. dia.?) righting line tied to the main
                    beam at the mast base works best for me....simple and reliable. I
                    run the free end under the first couple of tramp laces, and then
                    into my tramp pocket. The thickness make it easier on the hands,
                    and the routing makes it easy to deploy from under the tramp. It's
                    also easy to throw over the top of either hull. (I'm too short to
                    reach the self-retracting systems from over the hull, so I have to
                    pull them from underneath.) A few strategically placed knots in the
                    line make hand-holding easier. Better yet, I can engage my trapeze
                    hook over the proper knot so that I'm not having to hold my weight
                    (or my crew's who is leaning back on me) with my hands. This way,
                    we have plenty of hand/arm strength left to aggresively "climb" the
                    line, keeping our weight out of the water as the boat comes up.

                    Regarding Cash's comments, I'd rather turtle where it's
                    deep....things tend to break when they're bouncing on the bottom.
                    Further, around here the bottom's so muddy the mast just gets
                    stuck.....very difficult to remove w/o power assistance. I suppose
                    if you're in shallow enough water to walk and reach the masthead
                    that would be different. The last time I turtled in deep water, I
                    was amazed at how easily the boat came up to a normal capsize
                    position. My son and I stood as far back deck lips as possible, I
                    leaned back on the righting line, she porpoised right on up and
                    gently lay on her side.

                    Jerome Vaughan
                    Hobie 16
                    Clinton, Mi'sippi
                  • Bill
                    ... Wow if that didnt sound like an internet version of a slap in the face..... Jerome, most of us dont actually have a choice of where we sail, to some
                    Message 9 of 24 , Dec 6, 2007
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                      > Regarding Cash's comments,
                      Wow if that didnt sound like an internet version of a slap in the
                      face.....

                      Jerome, most of us dont actually have a choice of where we sail, to
                      some extent we do, but I was refering to the intire 200 miles of NJ
                      coast line and most of the offshore water from NY to Georgia and out
                      204 miles.



                      Jerome Vaughan
                      > Hobie 16
                      > Clinton, Mi'sippi
                      >
                    • C.S.Johnson
                      Hi Regarding righting a capsized cat. There is a very good system on the Catapult as standard. I have copied it on to my Unicorn. It does dot involve any poles
                      Message 10 of 24 , Dec 6, 2007
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                        Hi
                        Regarding righting a capsized cat. There is a very good system on the Catapult as standard. I have copied it on to my Unicorn. It does dot involve any poles dangling under the tramp. It consists of a 30" long six to one purchase on the bottom of each shroud. That is, there is a triple block on the end of suitably shortened shrouds and a another pair of triple blocks on the chain plates. The free end of the line from one purchase goes forward to a turning block on the front cross beam, through a cleat, across to the other side, through another cleat and turning block to the other shroud, forming an endless control line. After capsizing, uncleat the line and haul the line across to shorten the leeward shroud, automatically lengthening the windward shroud by the same amount. The effect of this is to tilt the hull to windward thus shortening the leverage of the mast by about 3 ft, and pushes the windward hull to windward by about 5 ft. You just need to climb up the toe straps to the windward hull and the boat rights its self. The catapult is slightly lighter than the Hobie so you may have to lean over a little. The Unicorn is an 18 ft single hander with a non sealed mast, my 135 lbs brings it up with no difficulty.
                        I do have 1 1/2" of foam built into pockets on the top panel of the sail. It is necessary to have a short lanyard between the cross beam and the mast to prevent the mast ball and socket coming apart. It may not be class legal for racing, but is a must if you sail alone, particularly on the sea. When the boat is upright haul the control line across recleat and tighten the shrouds. There is a bonus with this system. In very strong winds you can heel the mast to windward like a windsurfer and really make the boat travel, with very little risk of capsize. As you have converted some of the surplus side thrust into lifting the leeward hull. If you have any questions and I am sure you will, I will try to answer them.

                        Colin



                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Bill
                        To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 7:31 PM
                        Subject: [beachcats] Re: Righting pole


                        > Regarding Cash's comments,
                        Wow if that didnt sound like an internet version of a slap in the
                        face.....

                        Jerome, most of us dont actually have a choice of where we sail, to
                        some extent we do, but I was refering to the intire 200 miles of NJ
                        coast line and most of the offshore water from NY to Georgia and out
                        204 miles.

                        Jerome Vaughan
                        > Hobie 16
                        > Clinton, Mi'sippi
                        >






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                      • TrtlDave@aol.com
                        Hobie Cat makes a Upright Solo Righting System.? The Upright installs easily.? No holes to drill, no measurements are needed.? Attaches in five minutes to the
                        Message 11 of 24 , Dec 6, 2007
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                          Hobie Cat makes a Upright Solo Righting System.?
                          "The Upright installs easily.? No holes to drill, no measurements are needed.? Attaches
                          in five minutes to the existing shroud adjusters with a pair of pliers.? Racing rules allow carrying the Upright for emergencies, but it may not be used while racing.?"? the pair are $109.20 list, and are made for the 14,16,17,18, and 20.
                          included the cable for keeping the mast on the ball.
                          A Righting bucket is a good thing to carry also if you need the extra weight to right your cat.?

                          At our fleet outings,?we try to help the new members learn to right their cat?before?it becomes a necessity.

                          Every skipper should be able to right their cat by themselves.
                          Incase they are by themselves or if there crew is not able to help, hurt, or overboard.



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: C.S.Johnson <csjohnson@...>
                          To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thu, 6 Dec 2007 4:02 pm
                          Subject: Re: [beachcats] Re: Righting pole






                          Hi
                          Regarding righting a capsized cat. There is a very good system on the Catapult as standard. I have copied it on to my Unicorn. It does dot involve any poles dangling under the tramp. It consists of a 30" long six to one purchase on the bottom of each shroud. That is, there is a triple block on the end of suitably shortened shrouds and a another pair of triple blocks on the chain plates. The free end of the line from one purchase goes forward to a turning block on the front cross beam, through a cleat, across to the other side, through another cleat and turning block to the other shroud, forming an endless control line. After capsizing, uncleat the line and haul the line across to shorten the leeward shroud, automatically lengthening the windward shroud by the same amount. The effect of this is to tilt the hull to windward thus shortening the leverage of the mast by about 3 ft, and pushes the windward hull to windward by about 5 ft. You just need to climb up the toe straps to the windward hull and the boat rights its self. The catapult is slightly lighter than the Hobie so you may have to lean over a little. The Unicorn is an 18 ft single hander with a non sealed mast, my 135 lbs brings it up with no difficulty.
                          I do have 1 1/2" of foam built into pockets on the top panel of the sail. It is necessary to have a short lanyard between the cross beam and the mast to prevent the mast ball and socket coming apart. It may not be class legal for racing, but is a must if you sail alone, particularly on the sea. When the boat is upright haul the control line across recleat and tighten the shrouds. There is a bonus with this system. In very strong winds you can heel the mast to windward like a windsurfer and really make the boat travel, with very little risk of capsize. As you have converted some of the surplus side thrust into lifting the leeward hull. If you have any questions and I am sure you will, I will try to answer them.

                          Colin

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Bill
                          To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 7:31 PM
                          Subject: [beachcats] Re: Righting pole

                          > Regarding Cash's comments,
                          Wow if that didnt sound like an internet version of a slap in the
                          face.....

                          Jerome, most of us dont actually have a choice of where we sail, to
                          some extent we do, but I was refering to the intire 200 miles of NJ
                          coast line and most of the offshore water from NY to Georgia and out
                          204 miles.

                          Jerome Vaughan
                          > Hobie 16
                          > Clinton, Mi'sippi
                          >

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                        • jv1234_99
                          ... to ... NJ ... out ... Absolutely no slap intended, Bill, and I apologize if it sounded that way! You (sarcastically, I assumed) referred to not being able
                          Message 12 of 24 , Dec 6, 2007
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                            --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <b_cash_98@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Regarding Cash's comments,
                            > Wow if that didnt sound like an internet version of a slap in the
                            > face.....
                            >
                            > Jerome, most of us dont actually have a choice of where we sail,
                            to
                            > some extent we do, but I was refering to the intire 200 miles of
                            NJ
                            > coast line and most of the offshore water from NY to Georgia and
                            out
                            > 204 miles.

                            Absolutely no slap intended, Bill, and I apologize if it sounded
                            that way! You (sarcastically, I assumed) referred to not being able
                            to turtle in 6 feet of water as an "advantage", and I (poorly, I
                            guess) was trying to express some of the real dangers of flipping in
                            shallow water (for the benefit of those who may have choices
                            regarding the depth of water in which they sail).

                            We all have to figure out how to best deal with our local conditions
                            (particular boat, climate, venue, etc.) as we enjoy this awesome
                            sport. And I believe that one of the greatest aspects of this list
                            is that we get to hear from so many folks whose sailing conditions
                            vary so widely. The drawback is that sometimes we (I, at least)
                            tend to write about our own experiences as if they're universal
                            truths in these short posts.

                            Please don't take my comments as negative towards you, Bill. I have
                            the utmost respect for your passion for this sport, how you've
                            handled your local conditions, and your willingness to share your
                            knowledge and experiences.

                            Sincerely,

                            Jerome Vaughan
                            Hobie 16
                            Clinton, Mi'sippi
                          • gevoniuk
                            ... This fits with my experience when I rigged a similar righting pole for an H16 that mounted to the front crossbeam near the dolphin striker: it did not
                            Message 13 of 24 , Dec 7, 2007
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                              --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "jv1234_99" <jv1234_99@...> wrote:
                              >
                              ... It's the kind you hang from, not
                              > stand on. I'm guessing it's ~8 ft long as it sticks out a foot or
                              > so past the rear beam when stowed. All that said, it was not
                              > sufficient for he and his wife (~255 lb. combined) to right the H-16
                              > in zero wind (even with mast sealed, sheets loose, etc.). He and I
                              > (~330 lb.) could pop it right up.

                              This fits with my experience when I rigged a similar righting pole for
                              an H16 that mounted to the front crossbeam near the dolphin striker: it
                              did not provide enough leverage to right the boat solo. Convenient and
                              quick to deploy - yes; sufficient leverage to right solo - no (at least
                              in my case). I weigh a shade under 200lbs. When the wind and the
                              waves are just right I have solo-righted using just a righting line -
                              otherwise I need help, e.g. Solorite - which you stand on. However,
                              the latter is not available anymore as I understand it.

                              GaryE
                              H16
                              Durham, NC
                            • Bill
                              ... No harm done, the post refering to a slap in the face was sort ot tongue in cheek. Im bored, the weather sucks, cant sail and the weather is holding up
                              Message 14 of 24 , Dec 7, 2007
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                                >
                                > Absolutely no slap intended, Bill, and I apologize if it sounded
                                > that way!


                                No harm done, the post refering to a slap in the face was sort ot
                                tongue in cheek. Im bored, the weather sucks, cant sail and the
                                weather is holding up work as well. I hate this time of the year.
                                Between holidays so even if you could get away time and all that
                                needs to be done for holidays keeps you home.

                                You (sarcastically, I assumed) referred to not being able
                                > to turtle in 6 feet of water as an "advantage",

                                Exactly, the skinny water up here make sailing the T30 on the inside
                                almost more work then its worth and going out or in most inlets is a
                                lesson in clamping your butt cheeks. Once your outside things get
                                better if you stay offshore a bit but unless you 5 or more mile out
                                you still have to deal with waves and chop due to the shallow water.

                                Outr last sail down to Cape May (a 3 day 120 mile rnd trip) concluded
                                with us sailing with waves breaking (green water) over the bow of the
                                T30, this in only 20 something knots of wind. WE were in 20-30' of
                                water and the waves build quickly in this reletively shallow water.

                                On another trip we silied out into 7-10 waves, just outside the inlet
                                and the wind was only 15 knots or so, the first 1/2 hour sailing
                                across the waves was quite an experiance, while in the troughts the
                                waves towered over out heads. after truning South with the waves
                                behind us it became a pleasure.


                                and I (poorly, I
                                > guess) was trying to express some of the real dangers of flipping
                                in
                                > shallow water (for the benefit of those who may have choices
                                > regarding the depth of water in which they sail).

                                I prefer to just NOT flip

                                >
                                > We all have to figure out how to best deal with our local
                                conditions
                                > (particular boat, climate, venue, etc.) as we enjoy this awesome
                                > sport. And I believe that one of the greatest aspects of this list
                                > is that we get to hear from so many folks whose sailing conditions
                                > vary so widely. The drawback is that sometimes we (I, at least)
                                > tend to write about our own experiences as if they're universal
                                > truths in these short posts.
                                >
                                > Please don't take my comments as negative towards you, Bill.
                                I have
                                > the utmost respect for your passion for this sport, how you've
                                > handled your local conditions, and your willingness to share your
                                > knowledge and experiences.
                                >

                                AHHHHH, lets not get sloppy now, you only called me by my last name
                                (poor teenage memories of being called CASH during freshman/senior
                                vollyball, while I was a freshman)

                                Bill
                                AKA Cash, Crash Cash, Money, Billy Money
                              • stcbaker@aol.com
                                Thanks guys for all the advice . Ill try to figure out what can best work for me now. I think im happier everyone kissed and made up over this. Information and
                                Message 15 of 24 , Dec 9, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Thanks guys for all the advice . Ill try to figure out what can best work
                                  for me now. I think im happier everyone kissed and made up over this.
                                  Information and excitement at one web site just cant be beat. I didn't know the mast
                                  would still need to be sealed after i installed the hobie bob. I also
                                  noticed the boom was full of water the last time I intentionally turned her over.
                                  So ive got a big to do list this winter . Reinforcing the bottoms that have
                                  worn flat being my first task. Thanks Talmadge



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