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All that led...

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  • Tony_FX1
    Cant be good... http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285 A sad day for any sailor...
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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      Cant be good...
      http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285

      A sad day for any sailor...
    • Ken Wittlief
      ... esp for a sad sailor while they were playing with the main sail (trying to drop it 90° off the wind?! if they centered the main the boat would have
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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        --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1 <Tony@i...> wrote:
        > Cant be good...
        > http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
        >
        > A sad day for any sailor...

        esp for a sad sailor

        while they were playing with the main sail (trying to drop it 90°
        off the wind?! if they centered the main the boat would have pointed
        into the wind)

        anyway, while they were playing with the main the boat was sinking.
        A life jacket or other similar object most likely COULD have been
        used to block the hole and shored up, so the pumps could keep her
        afloat until the coast guard arrived.

        Every book on sailing ive ever read had a chapter on damage
        control. I guess some people dont bother to read that 'nonsense'.

        That boat could have been saved.

        -Ken W
      • PA38
        Good points, and that is why we have the phrase woulda - shoulda - coulda - funny what goes through your mind when you are faced with impending disaster - I
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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          Good points, and that is why we have the phrase "woulda - shoulda - coulda"
          - funny what goes through your mind when you are faced with impending
          disaster - I believe the call this the "pucker factor."




          -----Original Message-----
          From: beachcats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beachcats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Ken Wittlief
          Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 6:29 AM
          To: beachcats@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [beachcats] Re: All that led...


          --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1 <Tony@i...> wrote:
          > Cant be good... http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
          >
          > A sad day for any sailor...

          esp for a sad sailor

          while they were playing with the main sail (trying to drop it 90°
          off the wind?! if they centered the main the boat would have pointed
          into the wind)

          anyway, while they were playing with the main the boat was sinking.
          A life jacket or other similar object most likely COULD have been
          used to block the hole and shored up, so the pumps could keep her
          afloat until the coast guard arrived.

          Every book on sailing ive ever read had a chapter on damage
          control. I guess some people dont bother to read that 'nonsense'.

          That boat could have been saved.

          -Ken W





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        • jimbo_1490
          To go offshore in a tiny boat is a very responsible thing; you d better have your shit together! I know it a hindsight thing, but I saw no mention of anyone
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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            To go offshore in a tiny boat is a very responsible thing; you'd
            better have your shit together! I know it a hindsight thing, but I saw
            no mention of anyone going below to inspect the damage. Had they done
            so, certainly they would have directed resources toward the leaking
            rudder bearing hole instead of screwing around with the mainsail. Also
            note the lack of a backup plan to inflate the liferaft; no hand pump,
            no extra CO2 cylinder, NOTHING! Often after being occupied for a
            number of hours, an inflatable will need air again, so a hand pump is
            always a good idea.

            Jimbo

            --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Wittlief" <wittlief@a...> wrote:
            > --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1 <Tony@i...> wrote:
            > > Cant be good...
            > > http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
            > >
            > > A sad day for any sailor...
            >
            > esp for a sad sailor
            >
            > while they were playing with the main sail (trying to drop it 90°
            > off the wind?! if they centered the main the boat would have pointed
            > into the wind)
            >
            > anyway, while they were playing with the main the boat was sinking.
            > A life jacket or other similar object most likely COULD have been
            > used to block the hole and shored up, so the pumps could keep her
            > afloat until the coast guard arrived.
            >
            > Every book on sailing ive ever read had a chapter on damage
            > control. I guess some people dont bother to read that 'nonsense'.
            >
            > That boat could have been saved.
            >
            > -Ken W
          • James Wenzel
            This incident is a prime example why myself and my children will not go on a boat when I do not know the skipper s skills. He mentions a lot of ifs in the
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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              This incident is a prime example why myself and my
              children will not go on a boat when I do not know the
              skipper's skills. He mentions a lot of ifs in the
              article and how two major things were wrong. Granted I
              am a new sailor, but I have read many books so far on
              cat sailing and sailing in general. I liken it to
              motorcycle riding. I used to check EVERYTHING on my
              bike before I took it out. Axles to chain everything.
              Now at least with a bike you can pull over. You do not
              do that on a boat. The sadist part of this whole boat
              sinking tragedy is that it could have been avoided
              with prior planning and cool heads.

              *gets off soap box*



              --- jimbo_1490 <jimbo_1490@...> wrote:

              > To go offshore in a tiny boat is a very responsible
              > thing; you'd
              > better have your shit together! I know it a
              > hindsight thing, but I saw
              > no mention of anyone going below to inspect the
              > damage. Had they done
              > so, certainly they would have directed resources
              > toward the leaking
              > rudder bearing hole instead of screwing around with
              > the mainsail. Also
              > note the lack of a backup plan to inflate the
              > liferaft; no hand pump,
              > no extra CO2 cylinder, NOTHING! Often after being
              > occupied for a
              > number of hours, an inflatable will need air again,
              > so a hand pump is
              > always a good idea.
              >
              > Jimbo
              >
              > --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Wittlief"
              > <wittlief@a...> wrote:
              > > --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1
              > <Tony@i...> wrote:
              > > > Cant be good...
              > > > http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
              > > >
              > > > A sad day for any sailor...
              > >
              > > esp for a sad sailor
              > >
              > > while they were playing with the main sail
              > (trying to drop it 90°
              > > off the wind?! if they centered the main the boat
              > would have pointed
              > > into the wind)
              > >
              > > anyway, while they were playing with the main the
              > boat was sinking.
              > > A life jacket or other similar object most likely
              > COULD have been
              > > used to block the hole and shored up, so the pumps
              > could keep her
              > > afloat until the coast guard arrived.
              > >
              > > Every book on sailing ive ever read had a chapter
              > on damage
              > > control. I guess some people dont bother to read
              > that 'nonsense'.
              > >
              > > That boat could have been saved.
              > >
              > > -Ken W
              >
              >
              >
              >
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            • Ken Wittlief
              ... coulda ... from the article it appears the skipper was most concerned with not getting his feet wet ! -Ken W
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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                --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, "PA38" <pa38112@a...> wrote:
                > Good points, and that is why we have the phrase "woulda - shoulda -
                coulda"
                > - funny what goes through your mind when you are faced with impending
                > disaster - I believe the call this the "pucker factor."


                from the article it appears the skipper was most concerned with not
                getting his feet wet !

                -Ken W
              • Steve
                Isn t Hanse one of those uber-quality yachts? And no bilge alarm went off? Judging by the interior layout plan on the Hanse site, the rudder stock would be
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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                  Isn't Hanse one of those uber-quality yachts? And no bilge alarm went
                  off? Judging by the interior layout plan on the Hanse site, the
                  rudder stock would be conveniently placed under the master berth.

                  On the flipside, they did have an operable VHF and the rescuing boat
                  had their VHF in the ON position monitoring Ch 16. A lot of
                  daysailors skip the former, and if they don't, they skip the latter.

                  --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1 <Tony@i...> wrote:
                  > Cant be good...
                  > http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
                  >
                  > A sad day for any sailor...
                • Brad Altemeyer
                  It also looked too darn cold to hop over the side with stuffing and duct tape, although for that boat if I was wearing the right stuff I think I would have
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 1, 2005
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                    It also looked too darn cold to hop over the side with
                    stuffing and duct tape, although for that boat if I
                    was wearing the right stuff I think I would have
                    plugged and tapped the hole or at least tried.

                    Ciao,
                    Brad H16, Gcat5.0

                    --- Steve <lunalumen90@...> wrote:

                    > Isn't Hanse one of those uber-quality yachts? And
                    > no bilge alarm went
                    > off? Judging by the interior layout plan on the
                    > Hanse site, the
                    > rudder stock would be conveniently placed under the
                    > master berth.
                    >
                    > On the flipside, they did have an operable VHF and
                    > the rescuing boat
                    > had their VHF in the ON position monitoring Ch 16.
                    > A lot of
                    > daysailors skip the former, and if they don't, they
                    > skip the latter.
                    >
                    > --- In beachcats@yahoogroups.com, Tony_FX1
                    > <Tony@i...> wrote:
                    > > Cant be good...
                    > > http://www.hyc.ie/news/newsview.asp?newsid=285
                    > >
                    > > A sad day for any sailor...
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Group Home
                    > http://www.TheBeachcats.com
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    > beachcats-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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