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BSU on itunes, etc...

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  • Kenny Ray
    Attention, Harmonettes and Harmonuts, Finally... Bluegrass Student Union s collection of recordings is available on itunes, AmazonMP3, itunes-Europe &
    Message 1 of 6 , May 31, 2011
      Attention, Harmonettes and Harmonuts,

      Finally...

      Bluegrass Student Union's collection of recordings is available on itunes, AmazonMP3, itunes-Europe & CDbaby.com.  It was a long road, but we got 'em all loaded and tested. This should be OK until they come out with music chips implanted in your head (probably three or four years out).  Meanwhile, this is as convenient as we can make it.

      Our Legacy & Commencement box sets will be phased out, so if you prefer hard copies, get 'em while they last from Harmony Marketplace, Primarily A Cappella and Mainly A Cappella.  

      k-ray  

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ben McDaniel
      Harmonetters, Spoiler alert -- if anyone wants to try to figure out the context of these chords for themselves, skip this message for now, because I m going to
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
        Harmonetters,

        Spoiler alert -- if anyone wants to try to figure out the context of these
        chords for themselves, skip this message for now, because I'm going to
        reveal that.

        As far as the chord with the minor third and major seventh goes, it is
        usually seen where the prevailing harmony is a minor IV chord and the melody
        is on the major 7th of that chord. This is usually avoided by just using a
        IVM7, but often it sounds better to have a minor third in the chord, and if
        the performer doesn't make a big deal out of it, the judges will ignore the
        fact that the chord is not officially in the contest chord vocabulary. David
        Wright's arrangement of Old Saint Louie contains this chord (he arranged it
        for Quadratic Equation and then the Gas House Gang recorded it, but I don't
        know whether GHG ever sang it at contest; I know other quartets have sung it
        at contest). The ivM7 chord is on "sleepy" ("gas lights winking down a
        sleepy lane"). Root (Bb) in bass, fifth (F) in bari, major 7 (A) in lead,
        minor 3 (Db) in the tenor.

        Now for the no third chord -- two roots, a fifth, and a major seventh. This
        is actually a fairly common chord in tags, just not usually at contest. It
        is a passing chord, and it's based on the tonic (in other words, if you're
        in the key of Bb, the chord always has two Bb's, an F, and an A). It happens
        when the bass and (usually) tenor each post on the tonic (usually two
        octaves apart). Then the remaining two parts sing in parallel thirds or
        sixths with one another. The three chords you hear in that context are a
        tonic triad, a IV triad, and that weird tonic chord with a major seven and
        no third. For example, in Bb, you would have the bass and tenor on Bb's,
        then the lead might sing Eb-F-Eb-D while the bari sings G-A-G-F. That means
        the first chord is an Eb triad (IV) with the fifth of the chord in the bass
        and tenor, the second chord is the weird chord with no third (Bb-A-F-Bb),
        the third chord is back to IV, and the final chord is the tonic triad. Power
        Play sang these four chords (I can't remember what key they were in, though)
        on the last four words of "Love at Home" ("home, love at home"). The word
        "love" had the bass and tenor on the tonic two octaves apart, with the two
        inner parts on 7 and 5. If I remember correctly, Vocal Spectrum also sang
        this chord in contest, in the middle of David Wright's arrangement of
        "Wonderful One," on the "and" of "soft and low."

        So, anyone out there have examples of earlier quartets doing these chords at
        contest? How about just earlier quartets doing them at any time? I'm sure
        they've been in the non-contest vocabulary for a very long time, but I'm
        especially interested to know whether they've only recently begun to crop up
        at contest.

        This is not an important topic, it's just trivial trivia that interests me
        as a theory geek. So if any of the rest of you are theory geeks, let's see
        if we can find some history on these chords!

        Thanks,
        Ben McDaniel



        On Tue, May 31, 2011 at 6:17 PM, David Wallace <david@...>wrote:

        > *I don�t know the answers, but the doubled-root, no third chord is just
        > plain odd in our style, IMHO.*
        >
        > *What was the context?*
        >
        > *The minor-triad with a major 7th is unusual, but could have place�*
        >
        > * *
        >
        > *David **J***
        >
        > * *
        >
        > *David Wallace*
        >
        > *http://www.davidwallacemusic.com/***
        >
        > *Master Director � **"Sounds of Pittsburgh"** *Chorus (SAI)**
        >
        > *Lead � 1984 Int'l Champs, **"The Rapscallions"***
        >
        > * *
        >
        > *�Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.� � Plato*
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tgbari@aol.com
        Ben McDaniel asks:
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
          Ben McDaniel asks:

          << Question 1: Who was the first group to sing an arrangement
          at contest with a chord that had two roots, a fifth, and a major
          seventh in it (no third!)? I know Power Play did, but I suspect
          they weren't the first.

          Early in my judging career the prime example of this came from
          the Boston Common. Lou Perry's original, low tag of "From the
          First Hello" featured this voicing on the echo of the word "last."
          So the late '70s is the first I recall hearing the chord in contest,
          though it could have happened earlier.

          << Question 2: Who was the first to sing an arrangement at
          contest with a root, a perfect fifth, a minor third, and a major
          seventh in it? I know Gas House Gang sang an arrangement
          with that chord in it, but I don't know if they sang it at contest.
          (Other quartets have sung that particular arrangement at contest.)

          An early example of this is the Town and Country Four's "Daddy,
          You've Been a Mother to Me," which can be found on the 1960
          Top Ten album. The arranger was the lead of the quartet—gold
          medalist in 1963 after finishing third for three years straight—
          Larry Autenreith. Larry used the chord on "You were more than a
          DAD," toward the end of the chorus. Much of Larry's work has
          aged well and could still be sung in contest 50 years later.

          The chord also appears in the standard arrangement of "So Long,
          Sally." The place is "But someone's got to win, AND someone's
          got to lose." The "oo" sung by the three harmony parts and the
          short duration of the chord soften the dissonance.

          Though this chord, the minor-major seventh, is not in the barbershop
          vocabulary, Ben is correct in saying that we Music judges will accept
          it if it is brief and appropriate.

          Tom Gentry
          tgbari@...
          www.harmonize.ws/tgentry


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Wallace
          The minor-major 7th explanation is what I suspected: the other I should have figured out. As BBShop arrangers have a penchant to analyze and name every chord
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
            The minor-major 7th explanation is what I suspected: the other I should have figured out. As BBShop arrangers have a penchant to analyze and name every chord and are loathe to call anything a passing tone - even if in reality that's how it functions - yours would be the required analyzation. I'd guessed without much thought that it would be a walking bass or the like...

            ...nice brain-teaser, Ben.



            David
            http://www.davidwallace.us
            http://www.davidwallacemusic.com

            “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” — Plato

            -----Original Message-----
            From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ben McDaniel
            Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2011 3:22 AM
            To: david@...
            Cc: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [bbshop] Barbershop contest music theory trivia question

            Harmonetters,

            Spoiler alert -- if anyone wants to try to figure out the context of these chords for themselves, skip this message for now, because I'm going to reveal that.

            As far as the chord with the minor third and major seventh goes, it is usually seen where the prevailing harmony is a minor IV chord and the melody is on the major 7th of that chord. This is usually avoided by just using a IVM7, but often it sounds better to have a minor third in the chord, and if the performer doesn't make a big deal out of it, the judges will ignore the fact that the chord is not officially in the contest chord vocabulary. David Wright's arrangement of Old Saint Louie contains this chord (he arranged it for Quadratic Equation and then the Gas House Gang recorded it, but I don't know whether GHG ever sang it at contest; I know other quartets have sung it at contest). The ivM7 chord is on "sleepy" ("gas lights winking down a sleepy lane"). Root (Bb) in bass, fifth (F) in bari, major 7 (A) in lead, minor 3 (Db) in the tenor.

            Now for the no third chord -- two roots, a fifth, and a major seventh. This is actually a fairly common chord in tags, just not usually at contest. It is a passing chord, and it's based on the tonic (in other words, if you're in the key of Bb, the chord always has two Bb's, an F, and an A). It happens when the bass and (usually) tenor each post on the tonic (usually two octaves apart). Then the remaining two parts sing in parallel thirds or sixths with one another. The three chords you hear in that context are a tonic triad, a IV triad, and that weird tonic chord with a major seven and no third. For example, in Bb, you would have the bass and tenor on Bb's, then the lead might sing Eb-F-Eb-D while the bari sings G-A-G-F. That means the first chord is an Eb triad (IV) with the fifth of the chord in the bass and tenor, the second chord is the weird chord with no third (Bb-A-F-Bb), the third chord is back to IV, and the final chord is the tonic triad. Power Play sang these four chords (I can't remember what key they were in, though) on the last four words of "Love at Home" ("home, love at home"). The word "love" had the bass and tenor on the tonic two octaves apart, with the two inner parts on 7 and 5. If I remember correctly, Vocal Spectrum also sang this chord in contest, in the middle of David Wright's arrangement of "Wonderful One," on the "and" of "soft and low."

            So, anyone out there have examples of earlier quartets doing these chords at contest? How about just earlier quartets doing them at any time? I'm sure they've been in the non-contest vocabulary for a very long time, but I'm especially interested to know whether they've only recently begun to crop up at contest.

            This is not an important topic, it's just trivial trivia that interests me as a theory geek. So if any of the rest of you are theory geeks, let's see if we can find some history on these chords!

            Thanks,
            Ben McDaniel



            On Tue, May 31, 2011 at 6:17 PM, David Wallace <david@...>wrote:

            > *I don’t know the answers, but the doubled-root, no third chord is
            > just plain odd in our style, IMHO.*
            >
            > *What was the context?*
            >
            > *The minor-triad with a major 7th is unusual, but could have place…*
            >
            > * *
            >
            > *David **J***
            >
            > * *
            >
            > *David Wallace*
            >
            > *http://www.davidwallacemusic.com/***
            >
            > *Master Director – **"Sounds of Pittsburgh"** *Chorus (SAI)**
            >
            > *Lead – 1984 Int'l Champs, **"The Rapscallions"***
            >
            > * *
            >
            > *“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” — Plato*
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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