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Barbershop singing Whales?

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  • A Cappella News
    NPR s All Things Considered aired a few comments from listeners about a previously aired story regarding whale farming. Apparently, one of the farmers, Mr.
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2009
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      NPR's All Things Considered aired a few comments from listeners about a previously aired story regarding whale farming. Apparently, one of the "farmers," Mr. Summers, had been teaching the whales to sing in harmony. He says, "In achieving four-part harmony in whale song, I think we we have tied nature's most wondrous sound to a great barbershop tradition." A NPR listener, however, had this to say: "Having studied music at college, I want Mr. Summers to know that what he calls four-part harmony is not. Two of the whales are plainly singing the same note. That may be clever, but it's not barbershop." Well, Mr. Summers wasn't having any of that, and he replied, "It wasn't that the whales couldn't sing in harmony, they were just too busy expressing their individuality. They weren't so attached to the group."

      Listen here:-
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102618951


      --------------------------
      John Neal
      http://www.acappellanews.com
    • David Miller
      In whale barbershop quartet lingo that would be called stepping on the other parts tail. Or could be a unison hanger in the whale of a tag. ! ... -- Sent from
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3, 2009
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        In whale barbershop quartet lingo that would be called "stepping on
        the other parts tail.
        Or could be a unison hanger in the whale of a tag. !



        On 4/2/09, A Cappella News <harmony@...> wrote:
        > NPR's All Things Considered aired a few comments from listeners about a
        > previously aired story regarding whale farming. Apparently, one of the
        > "farmers," Mr. Summers, had been teaching the whales to sing in harmony. He
        > says, "In achieving four-part harmony in whale song, I think we we have tied
        > nature's most wondrous sound to a great barbershop tradition." A NPR
        > listener, however, had this to say: "Having studied music at college, I want
        > Mr. Summers to know that what he calls four-part harmony is not. Two of the
        > whales are plainly singing the same note. That may be clever, but it's not
        > barbershop." Well, Mr. Summers wasn't having any of that, and he replied,
        > "It wasn't that the whales couldn't sing in harmony, they were just too busy
        > expressing their individuality. They weren't so attached to the group."
        >
        > Listen here:-
        > http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102618951
        >
        >
        > --------------------------
        > John Neal
        > http://www.acappellanews.com
        >
        >

        --
        Sent from my mobile device
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