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Barbershop or not Barbershop

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  • Ehink557@aol.com
    Barbershop harmony has distinguished itself as an element of American folk music from an era when melodies were simpler. Maybe because they followed the rules
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
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      Barbershop harmony has distinguished itself as an element of American folk
      music from an era when melodies were simpler. Maybe because they followed the
      rules of continuity.

      If you wanna delve into the purism of the art form you need to visit the
      Ah-So room at any convention. The melodies chosen follow the circle of fifths
      that we have worked with for many years. Molly Regan had the best handle on it
      with his clock system.

      Don't get me wrong I love some of the progressive music that I listen to and
      arrange especially from the 40's. They still had very singable melodies.

      Why do we have the Pole Cat music? Is it singable for everyone? You bet. I
      admit that after a few hundred times with any one of the chosen we get a bit
      saturated but it's a center piece for all the many who love to
      sing......barbershop.

      How many times have you heard a group try to emulate a champion and fall
      flat. Chances are the music was not made for everyone. Maybe it ought to be.
      It's a trifle disheartening knowing that you can't sing that song you heard the
      other night because it's just too difficult.
      Modern music sometimes is. "My Wild Irish Rose" isn't.

      I have watched the evolving of music for 52 years in this great society and
      have come to realize I am no longer a part of the whole. There are charts
      that push the envelope beyond
      the easy singing we used to call barbershop. I suspect we'll hear "The
      Little Deuce Coupe" before long and miss out on "That Tumbled Down Shack in
      Athlone."

      Sure, we want younger voices in our midst and they many times prefer the
      "upgrades."
      Interesting point is they cut their teeth on Pole Cats and loved it. That's
      how we got 'em hooked in the first place.

      Bari..........ng up under the strain.....and loving it,

      Ed Hinkley
      Sarasota, Florida
      52 yr. Member

      Arranger/Songwriter

      Chorus Hall of Fame
      Chorus BOTY
      Friend to Barbershop Harmony

      941 371 1145

      I will not rest a minute till I find the reason why
      They say the world is not a prairie but a ball,
      I cannot share this wild belief it has to be a lie
      Because the people underneath would surely fall.





      ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rich Hasty
      If we were to limit ourselves to songs that everyone could sing, we would have to eliminate The Star Spangled Banner and hundreds of thousands of other
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
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        If we were to limit ourselves to songs that everyone could sing, we
        would have to eliminate "The Star Spangled Banner" and hundreds of
        thousands of other songs. "Sweet and Lovely" would also have to go
        because of those many singers that can't sing the lead notes at the
        end. That logic just doesn't ring true to me.

        In addition, I'm glad to report "That Tumble Down Shack" was sung by
        the second place quartet a few weeks ago in the EVG District.
        Moreover, two of the members of that group are under 25 years old.

        Rich

        --- In bbshop@yahoogroups.com, Ehink557@... wrote:
        >
        > Barbershop harmony has distinguished itself as an element of
        American folk
        > music from an era when melodies were simpler. Maybe because they
        followed the
        > rules of continuity.
        >
        > If you wanna delve into the purism of the art form you need to
        visit the
        > Ah-So room at any convention. The melodies chosen follow the circle
        of fifths
        > that we have worked with for many years. Molly Regan had the best
        handle on it
        > with his clock system.
        >
        > Don't get me wrong I love some of the progressive music that I
        listen to and
        > arrange especially from the 40's. They still had very singable
        melodies.
        >
        > Why do we have the Pole Cat music? Is it singable for everyone? You
        bet. I
        > admit that after a few hundred times with any one of the chosen we
        get a bit
        > saturated but it's a center piece for all the many who love to
        > sing......barbershop.
        >
        > How many times have you heard a group try to emulate a champion and
        fall
        > flat. Chances are the music was not made for everyone. Maybe it
        ought to be.
        > It's a trifle disheartening knowing that you can't sing that song
        you heard the
        > other night because it's just too difficult.
        > Modern music sometimes is. "My Wild Irish Rose" isn't.
        >
        > I have watched the evolving of music for 52 years in this great
        society and
        > have come to realize I am no longer a part of the whole. There are
        charts
        > that push the envelope beyond
        > the easy singing we used to call barbershop. I suspect we'll
        hear "The
        > Little Deuce Coupe" before long and miss out on "That Tumbled Down
        Shack in
        > Athlone."
        >
        > Sure, we want younger voices in our midst and they many times
        prefer the
        > "upgrades."
        > Interesting point is they cut their teeth on Pole Cats and loved
        it. That's
        > how we got 'em hooked in the first place.
        >
        > Bari..........ng up under the strain.....and loving it,
        >
        > Ed Hinkley
        > Sarasota, Florida
        > 52 yr. Member
        >
        > Arranger/Songwriter
        >
        > Chorus Hall of Fame
        > Chorus BOTY
        > Friend to Barbershop Harmony
        >
        > 941 371 1145
        >
        > I will not rest a minute till I find the reason why
        > They say the world is not a prairie but a ball,
        > I cannot share this wild belief it has to be a lie
        > Because the people underneath would surely fall.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ************************************** See what's new at
        http://www.aol.com
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Tim Buell
        Time for my 2 cents. I look at this from a slightly different viewpoint. What was OC Cash and Rupert Hall really trying to preserve. Was it really the form
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
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          Time for my 2 cents.

          I look at this from a slightly different viewpoint. What was OC
          Cash and Rupert Hall really trying to preserve. Was it really the
          form of music. I am sure that was part of it. But what I really
          think was the goal was to recapture the feeling of a group of
          friends standing in a group and making music together. It was the
          cameraderie that comes from spending time with folks that you enjoy
          and admire.

          Did OC Cash build his "Society" around a specific form of music?
          Yes, but where did that music come from. The groups OC Cash would
          have listened to when he was younger used guitars, and other
          instruments to accompany the singers. Where did those things go?
          Remember, he called it the Society for the Preservation and
          Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America. I submit
          that he was trying to preserve the Singing first and the style
          second.

          Where did the style come from? Four guys walked into a barbershop
          and there it was and they started singing it, right? No. They
          starteed singing, and as they EXPERIMENTED with new things, they
          heard sounds that were extremely pleasing, and they continued to
          sing those. The quartet came first, the music later.

          I wholeheartedly agree that we do not want to forget about the old
          songs. I love the way the chords ring. I love they way the words
          sound and the sentiments expressed. But I don't think saving the
          old songs precludes us from finding some new songs to sing as well.
          If OC Cash had wanted to do that, he would have published a list of
          songs and said, "Ok, boys. This is our repertoire. This is all you
          will be allowed to sing." That would have gotten pretty boring,
          pretty fast.

          Keep in mind, too, that if we narrow our focus too far, pretty soon
          there will be nobody left to preserve that which we love. Then what
          have we really preserved?

          Tim Buell
          Heart of Maryland Chorus
          Free State 4
        • Bob Patterson
          Tim, I m not disagreeing with you, just nit-picking. I think the original name was something like Society for Preservation and Promulgation............. or
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
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            Tim,

            I'm not disagreeing with you, just nit-picking.

            I think the original name was something like Society for Preservation and
            Promulgation............. or some such verbage.

            Bob Patterson,
            Bari, Tortilla Flats


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Tim Buell" <tpbuell@...>
            To: <bbshop@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 1:32 PM
            Subject: [bbshop] Re: Barbershop or not Barbershop


            > Time for my 2 cents.
            >
            > I look at this from a slightly different viewpoint. What was OC
            > Cash and Rupert Hall really trying to preserve. Was it really the
            > form of music. I am sure that was part of it. But what I really
            > think was the goal was to recapture the feeling of a group of
            > friends standing in a group and making music together. It was the
            > cameraderie that comes from spending time with folks that you enjoy
            > and admire.
            >
            > Did OC Cash build his "Society" around a specific form of music?
            > Yes, but where did that music come from. The groups OC Cash would
            > have listened to when he was younger used guitars, and other
            > instruments to accompany the singers. Where did those things go?
            > Remember, he called it the Society for the Preservation and
            > Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America. I submit
            > that he was trying to preserve the Singing first and the style
            > second.
            >
            > Where did the style come from? Four guys walked into a barbershop
            > and there it was and they started singing it, right? No. They
            > starteed singing, and as they EXPERIMENTED with new things, they
            > heard sounds that were extremely pleasing, and they continued to
            > sing those. The quartet came first, the music later.
            >
            > I wholeheartedly agree that we do not want to forget about the old
            > songs. I love the way the chords ring. I love they way the words
            > sound and the sentiments expressed. But I don't think saving the
            > old songs precludes us from finding some new songs to sing as well.
            > If OC Cash had wanted to do that, he would have published a list of
            > songs and said, "Ok, boys. This is our repertoire. This is all you
            > will be allowed to sing." That would have gotten pretty boring,
            > pretty fast.
            >
            > Keep in mind, too, that if we narrow our focus too far, pretty soon
            > there will be nobody left to preserve that which we love. Then what
            > have we really preserved?
            >
            > Tim Buell
            > Heart of Maryland Chorus
            > Free State 4
          • Bill Byrd
            Preservation and Propagation.... Bill Byrd ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 2, 2007
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              Preservation and Propagation....
              Bill Byrd

              On 11/2/07, Bob Patterson <tortillaflats@...> wrote:
              >
              > Tim,
              >
              > I'm not disagreeing with you, just nit-picking.
              >
              > I think the original name was something like Society for Preservation and
              > Promulgation............. or some such verbage.
              >
              > Bob Patterson,
              > Bari, Tortilla Flats
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "Tim Buell" <tpbuell@... <tpbuell%40comcast.net>>
              > To: <bbshop@yahoogroups.com <bbshop%40yahoogroups.com>>
              > Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 1:32 PM
              > Subject: [bbshop] Re: Barbershop or not Barbershop
              >
              > > Time for my 2 cents.
              > >
              > > I look at this from a slightly different viewpoint. What was OC
              > > Cash and Rupert Hall really trying to preserve. Was it really the
              > > form of music. I am sure that was part of it. But what I really
              > > think was the goal was to recapture the feeling of a group of
              > > friends standing in a group and making music together. It was the
              > > cameraderie that comes from spending time with folks that you enjoy
              > > and admire.
              > >
              > > Did OC Cash build his "Society" around a specific form of music?
              > > Yes, but where did that music come from. The groups OC Cash would
              > > have listened to when he was younger used guitars, and other
              > > instruments to accompany the singers. Where did those things go?
              > > Remember, he called it the Society for the Preservation and
              > > Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America. I submit
              > > that he was trying to preserve the Singing first and the style
              > > second.
              > >
              > > Where did the style come from? Four guys walked into a barbershop
              > > and there it was and they started singing it, right? No. They
              > > starteed singing, and as they EXPERIMENTED with new things, they
              > > heard sounds that were extremely pleasing, and they continued to
              > > sing those. The quartet came first, the music later.
              > >
              > > I wholeheartedly agree that we do not want to forget about the old
              > > songs. I love the way the chords ring. I love they way the words
              > > sound and the sentiments expressed. But I don't think saving the
              > > old songs precludes us from finding some new songs to sing as well.
              > > If OC Cash had wanted to do that, he would have published a list of
              > > songs and said, "Ok, boys. This is our repertoire. This is all you
              > > will be allowed to sing." That would have gotten pretty boring,
              > > pretty fast.
              > >
              > > Keep in mind, too, that if we narrow our focus too far, pretty soon
              > > there will be nobody left to preserve that which we love. Then what
              > > have we really preserved?
              > >
              > > Tim Buell
              > > Heart of Maryland Chorus
              > > Free State 4
              >
              >
              >
              >


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