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Re: [bbshop] Quiet Heroes, Ordinary Miracles

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  • EveDeCuir@aol.com
    I d like to offer public praise and thanks to Steve Tremper for the past six years of generous service he has given to the members of this list and to our
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 30, 2001
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      I'd like to offer public praise and thanks to Steve Tremper for the past six
      years of generous service he has given to the members of this list and to our
      organizations.

      Find a need and fill it. It is a secret compulsion within each of us to be
      productive in positive ways that impact others. Steve accomplished that by
      recognizing a need and filling it expertly and at great sacrifice.

      Steve brought attention to the need for more information for those people who
      couldn't make the trip to International. The product of his work hints at
      the strange phenomena of being a victim of one's own success, a bittersweet
      truth about advancing technology. The reporting was done so well that it
      captured the attention and imagination of the leadership who then set to work
      to provide the service via web casting. It will, no doubt, continue in the
      same vein as leadership endeavors to provide professional updates in real
      time, provides detailed and professionally formatted scores instantly, and
      even makes available for download video cuts of each competitor.

      Steve's vision had an impact upon me, personally, reawakening my craving for
      writing. I'd put it away for two decades tucked neatly away in storage
      behind a dusty memory of my first quartet while still a teenager, a cob
      webbed remembrance of The Arranger's Guide, and the frayed and faded
      recollections of Donny Osmond, Bobby Sherman, and John Travolta.

      In quiet, ordinary fashion, the Harmonet Reporter gave many people a front
      row seat to the crowning event of their beloved hobby. Some say it was
      almost like being there, for others it was better than being there, and for
      everyone the effort created a historical record that will live on.

      Our organizations are filled with people like Steve who seek to make a
      positive contribution that will impact others. Such service isn't usually
      featured under bright lights, rewarded with applause, or decorated with gold
      medals or crowns recognizing the effort that went into the creation of
      something special...something that defines excellence...something that takes
      us all down the road a little further toward the never-to-be-reached goal of
      perfection. Nonetheless, the overtones are unmistakable. The impact just as
      important, if not more so.

      Its been said that our hobby is a real life demonstration of how ordinary
      people come together to accomplish extraordinary things. Steve provided the
      leadership for ordinary folks who then produced something extraordinary.

      What was it that made Steve's contribution so very special? In my opinion it
      was the commitment that he made to do it and to do it well. Peter Drucker
      says it well:

      "Unless commitment is made, there are only hopes and promises...but no plans."

      Great plan, Steve. Thanks.

      In song,

      Janice Hatton DeCuir















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Elving
      Maybe what we need to do is talk to the powers that be and add Steve to the crew as color commentator . He could give what he has been doing in writing as
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 30, 2001
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        Maybe what we need to do is talk to the powers that be and add Steve to the
        crew as "color commentator". He could give what he has been doing in writing
        as part of the reporting team. Not that the people doing it now aren't good,
        but Steve has all those years of practice and knowledge invested. Let the
        society use him to the max.

        Sing-cerely & Humm-bly,

        John Elving mailto:jelving@...
        Rapid City, South Dakota
      • Jim Adams
        Personally, I think they should give him a guest slot on the webcast! ... From: EveDeCuir@aol.com [mailto:EveDeCuir@aol.com] Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2001 7:10
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2001
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          Personally, I think they should give him a guest slot on the webcast!

          -----Original Message-----
          From: EveDeCuir@... [mailto:EveDeCuir@...]
          Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2001 7:10 AM
          To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [bbshop] Quiet Heroes, Ordinary Miracles



          I'd like to offer public praise and thanks to Steve Tremper for the past six
          years of generous service he has given to the members of this list and to our
          organizations.

          ...
        • David Bowen
          Fellow Harmonetters, you all know Steve Tremper for his contributions as Harmonet Reporter and Scoring Summary Poster. But he s also contributed in a behind
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 2, 2001
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            Fellow Harmonetters, you all know Steve Tremper for his contributions as
            Harmonet Reporter and Scoring Summary Poster. But he's also contributed
            in a behind the scenes role that has helped end one of his more public ones.
            In, I believe, the fall of 1996, Society President Dick Shaw, put together
            a task force on Information Technology with the assignment to investigate
            the current trends and look at ways the Society could use them to improve
            its operations and increase its public presence. Steve and I were both on
            that original task force and one of the first things we did was put together
            a wish list starting with simple things like using e-mail instead of snail
            mail for Society business and getting a web site up and ending up with
            "blue-sky" items like webcasts of the International Convention. Like most
            task forces, we then proceeded to make recommendations to the Society's
            Board on how the items on the wish list might be implemented. Much of
            it was infrastructure, putting better computers and networks into Kenosha
            so everyone had e-mail access and so we had the computer horsepower to
            handle the data base work the plans would require. Bit by bit things came
            together, a web cam at Harmony College and delayed broadcast of the keynote
            address, then more music clips and the ARI archives, on line contest
            registration, last year's webcast of the quartet finals and now a week plus
            of live webcasts from the International. The things that five years ago
            were blue sky are a reality today and Steve was one of the folks who
            helped the Society make them a reality. So if you see Larry Clemons, our
            first chairman, or Scott Hoge who made all of those plans happen, thank
            them for their work. And now you know the rest of the story.

            Dave Bowen
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