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RE: Re(2): [bbshop] Nollaig Chridheil agus Bliadhna mhath ùr!

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  • Steve Currington
    Hmm.. Bill... Some of what you say sounds a little like the original Native aboriginal Americans.. Who existsed loooong before any Europeans (or teh rest of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 1, 2007
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      Hmm.. Bill...
      Some of what you say sounds a little like the original Native "aboriginal" Americans..
      Who existsed loooong before any Europeans (or teh rest of teh world probbaly fro that matter) even knew the America's existed.

      Hmm ... and where did that "English" language that the American people have seen fit to yet further modify originate from..
      Ahhh yes to quote the wise
      "(let's see... Norsemen from Scandinavia, Normans from France, European surges
      giving rise to what we now know as English). "

      <grin>

      Steve Currington
      Wellington, New Zealand
      (expat Bri - or Anglo/Saxon if your prefer)



      -----Original Message-----
      From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill Young
      Sent: Monday, 1 January 2007 10:10 a.m.
      To: Barbershop Board
      Subject: Re(2): [bbshop] Nollaig Chridheil agus Bliadhna mhath ùr!



      <snipped>

      Let us keep our perspective: this was being spoken by folks painting
      themselves with woad and living in thatched buildings, while a colossus was
      built in Rhodes, a magnificent library was built in Alexandria, pyramids
      were built in Egypt, the concept of zero was discovered by Arabic scholars,
      gunpowder was invented by the Chinese, and writers such as Pliny and
      Aristotle flourished around the Mediterranean. Given the location of the
      British Isles, there is every reason IMHO to consider Gaelic a local
      language, but, as history unfolded, far from the prevalent language (let's
      see... Norsemen from Scandinavia, Normans from France, European surges
      giving rise to what we now know as English). It's not to be put down... but
      not to be held up as a priceless and sacred heritage either.

      Bill Young
      Baritone and history/English major
      "Whanne that Aprille with his shoures soote / the droughte of March hath
      percèd to the roote"







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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