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Re: [bbshop] SSB and Messiah

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  • Don Gooding
    ... Maybe I missed an earlier part of this conversation, but are you familiar with Handel s Messiah: A Soulful Celebration CD? Mervyn Warren and ... Mervyn
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2004
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      At 12:51 PM 5/29/2004, Bob Winters wrote:
      >Does anyone else feel like I do , that the Star Spangled Banner should be
      >interpreted the way one feels it, culturally or musically, as long as
      >whoever is listening to it would know what the anthem is while hearing it
      >? After all, the SSB is our anthem. It belongs to us all. It seems to me
      >that it's the job of the performer to connect us to the patriotic
      >sentiment. Why sing it if no one will recognize it?
      >
      >Handel's Messiah, on the other hand, is not an English bar song made into
      >an anthem. It is a work of art like Michelangelo's David and should not be
      >screwed around with.

      Maybe I missed an earlier part of this conversation, but are you familiar
      with Handel's Messiah: A Soulful Celebration CD? Mervyn Warren and
      others collaborate. Here's what someone said who didn't like it:

      >It is true that a track or two has a few bars of African drumming, but
      >99 percent features a drum synthesizer. Similarly, you can hear the
      >occasional few bars of gospel, but 99 percent of this CD features
      >Messiah reworked in a sort of 70s Black pop style. At the very least,
      >I thought the Hallelujah Chorus would be a rafter-rocking gospel chorus
      >- Lord, they made it into a show tune.


      >I can live with different presentations of the SSB as long as I can tell
      >what is being sung. I can't live with some yoyo thinking he, she, or they
      >can or should try to improve on Handel.
      >Bob Winters

      Mervyn Warren isn't a yoyo, but I can't say as this is my cup of tea.
      On the other hand, I'm sure there are Beatles fans who would think
      barbershop versions of "Yesterday" are a travesty as well.



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    • Kevin Keller
      Don Gooding made the following observation from a previous post: ... DG: Mervyn Warren isn t a yoyo, but I can t say as this is my cup of tea. On the other
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 2, 2004
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        Don Gooding made the following observation from a previous post:

        Previous post:
        >I can live with different presentations of the SSB as long as I can tell
        >what is being sung. I can't live with some yoyo thinking he, she, or they
        >can or should try to improve on Handel.

        DG: Mervyn Warren isn't a yoyo, but I can't say as this is my cup of tea.
        On the other hand, I'm sure there are Beatles fans who would think
        barbershop versions of "Yesterday" are a travesty as well.

        KK: What's that? It sounds like the sound when a hammer squarely hits a
        nail.

        I was out of town last week and busy this past weekend so I never did reply
        to this thread. My thoughts exactly. It is hypocritical of us, as
        barbershoppers, to impose a creative restriction on any song or composer,
        when we turn around and impose our style on songs. The majority of our
        music (95+%) was not written for the barbershop style. It merely lends
        itself to the barbershop style. We don't have to like certain treatments
        of music. Fine. Don't attend the concerts, don't buy the CD's. But it is
        a strength that we have to demonstrate our creative ideas.

        And, by the way, do you really like Handel the way he intended it? With a
        small chamber orchestra with authentic instruments and small chamber chorus
        (24-32 singers)? Probably
        Christopher Hogwood would be a good choice for a close representation. The
        Hallelujah Chorus, as written, requires a light treatment. The centuries
        has taken it to a sometimes bombastic treatment, because that's what "we"
        want it to
        sound like. But I diverge. ;-)

        Cheers!

        Kevin Keller
      • John Elving
        To say nothing of the ornamentations in the solo parts called for by the stylings of the day, but not written in. Definitely not what the ordinary singer of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 2, 2004
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          To say nothing of the ornamentations in the solo parts called for by the
          stylings of the day, but not written in. Definitely not what the
          ordinary singer of the time (or today) can easily do. But it sure makes
          things interesting to see what each performer does to make it fit within
          the style. (And I'm not talking personal, contemporary "stylin'" we have
          been discussing.

          Sing-cerely & Humm-bly,

          John Elving mailto:jelving1@...
          Rapid City, South Dakota


          -----Original Message-----
          And, by the way, do you really like Handel the way he intended it? With
          a
          small chamber orchestra with authentic instruments and small chamber
          chorus
          (24-32 singers)? Probably
          Christopher Hogwood would be a good choice for a close representation.
          The
          Hallelujah Chorus, as written, requires a light treatment. The
          centuries
          has taken it to a sometimes bombastic treatment, because that's what
          "we"
          want it to
          sound like. But I diverge. ;-)
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