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Re: [bbshop] Disinfecting microphones, et al

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  • Shelley Herman
    Stay away from the spray! Wiping is OK if you must. But to repeat myself, even louder: BARBERSHOPPERS DO NOT NEED TO HAND HOLD MICROPHONES. LEAVE IT ON THE
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
      Stay away from the spray! Wiping is OK if you must. But to repeat
      myself, even louder: BARBERSHOPPERS DO NOT NEED TO HAND HOLD
      MICROPHONES. LEAVE IT ON THE STAND AT LEAST ARMS LENGTH AWAY FROM THE
      QUARTET.

      At arms length, you are not going to catch anything from anyone.

      Shelley Herman
      saherman@...




      On Mar 22, 2013, at 9:30 AM, Stephen Rafe wrote:

      > I was only thinking of "misting" the equipment, not drowning
      > it.Would it be
      > all right to wipe the microphones' surfaces with a tissue that has a
      > little
      > Lysol on it?



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • goldmedl
      Shelley - we do use hand held microphones all the time for soloists singing with chorus background (ooohh/aaah shooby doo wah kind of stuff in the chorus parts
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
        Shelley - we do use hand held microphones all the time
        for soloists singing with chorus background (ooohh/aaah
        shooby doo wah kind of stuff in the chorus parts ;-) on show performances.
        These mics then often get (literally) handed off to the next soloist
        coming out for the next solo section within a song OR
        for the next song in the show lineup.

        Obviously these are not arrangements that would fly
        in a contest environment since they have more than 4 voice parts.
        (Jay calls 'em "Show 'Shop. :-)

        These mics are usually those Shure 58s or somesuch?!
        And yes, the tech guy at the high school where NT stages
        their shows uses wind screens on all these mics. :-)

        - Helen Giallombardo


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Shelley Herman
        In this case, I repeat, don t stuff the mic into your mouth, six inches is close enough. If you are worried in this situation, spray the windscreen with
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
          In this case, I repeat, don't stuff the mic into your mouth, six
          inches is close enough. If you are worried in this situation, spray
          the windscreen with disinfectant WHEN IT IS OFF THE MICROPHONE and
          hope for the best.

          Not all hand held mic's are SM58's. I often use Beyer ribbons for
          that duty, they sound ever so much better!

          Shelley Herman
          saherman@...




          On Mar 22, 2013, at 4:46 PM, GSBMedalMusic@... wrote:

          > Shelley - we do use hand held microphones all the time
          > for soloists singing with chorus background (ooohh/aaah
          > shooby doo wah kind of stuff in the chorus parts ;-) on show
          > performances.
          > These mics then often get (literally) handed off to the next soloist
          > coming out for the next solo section within a song OR
          > for the next song in the show lineup.
          >
          > Obviously these are not arrangements that would fly
          > in a contest environment since they have more than 4 voice parts.
          > (Jay calls 'em "Show 'Shop. :-)
          >
          > These mics are usually those Shure 58s or somesuch?!
          > And yes, the tech guy at the high school where NT stages
          > their shows uses wind screens on all these mics. :-)



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Moran
          Put tape on the stage where you want the singers to stand. The microphones that may need cleaning are some radio station microphones like the RE20 s Sent from
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
            Put tape on the stage where you want the singers to stand. The microphones that may need cleaning are some radio station microphones like the RE20's

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Mar 22, 2013, at 1:54 AM, Robert Dunn <bobdunn@...> wrote:

            > Shelly, et. al.,
            >
            > When I do the sound for our chapter, I use large diameter capacitor mics, like the AT 4033, the AT 4050 or the Shure KSM 32. I am CONSTANTLY assuring the quartets that the mics are plenty sensitive, and that there is no reason to get within an arm's length, or so, from it. That way the quartet can cup around it with the mic at the focal point. But, I still find Barbershoppers creeping up on it and getting closer than I want, causing breath pops, etc.
            >
            > But NOW! GENIUS! I will tell them that if they get too close to it they will get some terrible disease that will wreak havoc on their health and voices. So, if not just for the sound production of the mics, at least for the health aspects of the singers, please stay at least 18" away from
            > the mic.
            >
            > GENIUS, I say.
            >
            > In Love and Harmony,
            >
            > Bob Dunn
            > Walnut Creek, CA
            > The Devil Mountain Chorus
            >
            > --- On Thu, 3/21/13, Shelley Herman <saherman@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Shelley Herman <saherman@...>
            > Subject: Re: [bbshop] Disinfecting microphones, et al
            > To: "John Witmer" <witmer@...>
            > Cc: "Harmonet" <bbshop@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: Thursday, March 21, 2013, 9:14 PM
            >
            > If you are worried about catching a bug from a contaminated
            >
            > microphone, carry your own windscreen with you. Most windscreens will
            >
            > fit an assortment of microphones. Don't try to make your own
            >
            > windscreen with any old foam, because most foam is 'closed cell' and
            >
            > will function as a sound muffler.
            >
            > That being said, this should not be a problem for barbershoppers
            >
            > because we should not be holding mic's close to our mouths like
            >
            > soloists do.
            >
            > If you want to wipe a mic, use an alcohol wipe or other disinfectant
            >
            > wipe on a handheld mic. Don't use a spray. Mic's on a stand are not a
            >
            > problem because you should not be touching the mic anyway.
            >
            > I always preach to quartets: "Be aware of the mic, but don't touch it!"
            >
            > Shelley Herman
            >
            > saherman@...
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Shelley Herman
            Electro Voice RE20 or almost any of their mic s from that era are marginal for use with barbershop. The pattern and equalization are not kind to our kind of
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
              Electro Voice RE20 or almost any of their mic's from that era are
              marginal for use with barbershop. The pattern and equalization are
              not kind to our kind of music. Very dry sound. They are designed for
              spoken word. The RE20 is probably the best announce since the RCA
              44BX Shure and especially Beyerdynamic are much better choices for
              singers. The Royer cardioid is a good quartet mic, but my favorite
              is the RCA 77DX.

              I was at a Grammy party where Sarah Vaughn sang using a Beyer M500,
              with the Count Basie band backing her up. In the dictionary next to
              the word smoooooth is that picture.

              And just to refresh your memories about Beyonce singing to prerecorded
              track. Every movie musical you have ever seen, from The Jazz Singer
              onward has the singers lip synching to pre recorded tracks. The
              easiest way to tell is by watching and listening: If you see a
              soloist or chorus singing and it sounds like they are close to the
              mic,and you don't see a microphone in the picture or the lead singer
              turns away ffom the front and their voice stays the same., Guess
              What--lip sync. Also most production numbers have the orchestra record
              first, then the vocals are recorded. When it comes time to shoot the
              picture the whole thing is played on big speakers on the sound stage
              and everyone dances and sings to the pre-recorded track. It's really
              expensive to "take 2" on a 100 person production number because the
              third trumpet played a wrong note! Two movies that depict this
              process are Singin' In The Rain and Jolson Sings Again.

              Les Paul is the one who pioneered this process for live sound, he also
              invented multi track recording.

              With the advances in wireless microphones and in-ear monitors, some of
              the entertainers are bravely trying to do it live. Some of the
              independents on a really cheap budget try to not prerecord, but the
              results are obvious.

              Most of the big production TV musical shows are also done this way.
              The exceptions are classical music and Andre Rieu.


              Shelley Herman
              saherman@...




              On Mar 22, 2013, at 10:33 PM, Michael Moran wrote:

              > Put tape on the stage where you want the singers to stand. The
              > microphones that may need cleaning are some radio station
              > microphones like the RE20's
              >
              > Sent from my iPhone
              >
              > On Mar 22, 2013, at 1:54 AM, Robert Dunn <bobdunn@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              >> Shelly, et. al.,
              >>
              >> When I do the sound for our chapter, I use large diameter capacitor
              >> mics, like the AT 4033, the AT 4050 or the Shure KSM 32. I am
              >> CONSTANTLY assuring the quartets that the mics are plenty
              >> sensitive, and that there is no reason to get within an arm's
              >> length, or so, from it. That way the quartet can cup around it
              >> with the mic at the focal point. But, I still find Barbershoppers
              >> creeping up on it and getting closer than I want, causing breath
              >> pops, etc.
              >>
              >> But NOW! GENIUS! I will tell them that if they get too close to
              >> it they will get some terrible disease that will wreak havoc on
              >> their health and voices. So, if not just for the sound production
              >> of the mics, at least for the health aspects of the singers, please
              >> stay at least 18" away from
              >> the mic.
              >>
              >> GENIUS, I say.
              >>
              >> In Love and Harmony,
              >>
              >> Bob Dunn
              >> Walnut Creek, CA
              >> The Devil Mountain Chorus
              >>
              >> --- On Thu, 3/21/13, Shelley Herman <saherman@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> From: Shelley Herman <saherman@...>
              >> Subject: Re: [bbshop] Disinfecting microphones, et al
              >> To: "John Witmer" <witmer@...>
              >> Cc: "Harmonet" <bbshop@yahoogroups.com>
              >> Date: Thursday, March 21, 2013, 9:14 PM
              >>
              >> If you are worried about catching a bug from a contaminated
              >>
              >> microphone, carry your own windscreen with you. Most windscreens will
              >>
              >> fit an assortment of microphones. Don't try to make your own
              >>
              >> windscreen with any old foam, because most foam is 'closed cell' and
              >>
              >> will function as a sound muffler.
              >>
              >> That being said, this should not be a problem for barbershoppers
              >>
              >> because we should not be holding mic's close to our mouths like
              >>
              >> soloists do.
              >>
              >> If you want to wipe a mic, use an alcohol wipe or other disinfectant
              >>
              >> wipe on a handheld mic. Don't use a spray. Mic's on a stand are not a
              >>
              >> problem because you should not be touching the mic anyway.
              >>
              >> I always preach to quartets: "Be aware of the mic, but don't touch
              >> it!"
              >>
              >> Shelley Herman
              >>
              >> saherman@...
              >>



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Stephen Rafe
              Not all of my singing is barbershopping. And the singers I coach privately aren t barbershoppers. One place where I sing regularly (including last night from 9
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 23, 2013
                Not all of my singing is barbershopping. And the singers I coach privately aren't barbershoppers.
                One place where I sing regularly (including last night from 9 to midnight) has mics that require the singers to be within 3 inches of the head -- otherwise they pick up too much ambient sound. The place where I'll be singing tonight also requires close contact with the mic.

                A singer I worked with on voice production auditioned for a regional Idol competition and was told in rehearsal (without the band) that she would be fine holding the microphone 10-12 inches away from her face. Then when she performed, the band drowned her out so she pushed hard to try to compensate and ended up with a sore throat.

                Thanks --

                Stephen
                STEPHEN RAFE

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Stephen Rafe
                They all need cleaning IMO. And don t forget the barrels. If you re ever in a gig of any kind where there are no stands you ll be holding the mics barrels and
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 23, 2013
                  They all need cleaning IMO. And don't forget the barrels. If you're ever in a gig of any kind where there are no stands you'll be holding the mics barrels and chances are those who have precede you have touched stuff that can carry some pretty nasty "bugs."

                  Further to this topic as I keep digging into the research:.

                  "Microphones can be a breeding ground for bacteria. Microphones are used in front of our mouths. They are spit on, sneezed on and handled from the top down. The germs and viruses left on a microphone can remain infectious for as long as 48 hours or more depending on how much moisture is present."

                  So take care of the microphones' barrels --not just the heads.

                  "It is generally believed that cold and flu viruses survive for longer periods on nonporous surfaces - such as plastic, metal or wood - than they do on porous surfaces - such as fabric or paper. Although cold and flu viruses primarily spread from person-to-person contact, they can also spread from contact with contaminated objects or surfaces."

                  http://www.jdbsound.com/microphone_health.pdf

                  BTW -- I am about to buy my own mic (for non-barbershop singing). Which of these four brands should I purchase? Shure, Sennheiser, Audio Technica or AKG?

                  Thanks --

                  Stephen
                  STEPHEN RAFE
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Michael Moran
                  To: Robert Dunn
                  Cc: John Witmer ; Shelley Herman ; Harmonet
                  Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 1:33 AM
                  Subject: Re: [bbshop] Disinfecting microphones, et al



                  Put tape on the stage where you want the singers to stand. The microphones that may need cleaning are some radio station microphones like the RE20's

                  Sent from my iPhone



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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