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RE: [bbshop] EXTREMELY OFF TOPIC - jpeg file definition

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  • Jeremy Reynolds
    Group I know Marty got his answer but whenever you find an abbreviation or acronym you don t understand, Google it! 99.99 times out of 100, you ll get the
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
      Group

      I know Marty got his answer but whenever you find an abbreviation or acronym
      you don't understand, Google it! 99.99 times out of 100, you'll get the
      definition or translation of it. For example, when I Googled JPEG, I got
      "Joint Photographic Experts Group". And Wikipedia had the following:

      The term "JPEG" is an acronym for the Joint Photographic Experts Group,
      which created the standard.

      along with a definition of the format. For those of you (probably not many)
      who don't know Wikipedia, this is a cooperative encyclopedia. It is mostly
      right on nearly any subject. Since it is cooperative, it relies on the
      knowledge and honesty of all of us who might contribute to it. But also, if
      you find an inaccuracy, YOU are allowed to correct it. Wiki is a Hawaiian
      word meaning "quick" or "fast". If you have special knowledge about a
      subject and cannot find it in Wikipedia, you can add it. Heck, you could
      even add an article about yourself, though I wouldn't recommend it. Your
      enemies might alter it to your detriment. (^o^)

      Jeremy Reynolds
      Tenor, HarmoniX quartet

      -----Original Message-----
      From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Marty Israel
      Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 9:10 AM
      To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [bbshop] EXTREMELY OFF TOPIC - jpeg file definition


      Hi Netters!

      Thank you to everyone who responded!! It all helped!!

      Canto ergo sum

      Marty Israel
      Long live the 7th




      To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
      From: firmbari@...
      Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2012 12:00:05 -0400
      Subject: [bbshop] EXTREMELY OFF TOPIC - jpeg file definition







      Hi Netters,

      Sorry for the intrusion.

      Can anyone give me a layman's terms definition of a jpeg file?

      Please respond privately.

      Thank you!!

      Canto ergo sum

      Marty Israel
      Long live the 7trh

      .



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Bert Laurence
      ... Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone? How long would the chime be? Inquiring minds want to know!! Bert
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
        >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
        > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
        > the Perseus Galaxy.
        > ...
        > http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesounds/
        > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
        > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
        > for at least 2.5 Billion years...

        Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
        How long would the chime be?

        Inquiring minds want to know!!

        Bert
      • Tom Meier
        According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm and using their Cord Calculator [sic], the length of a tube for that 10 million year
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
          According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm

          and using their "Cord Calculator" [sic],

          the length of a tube for that 10 million year B-flat would be:



          269,028 miles 3114 feet and 8 inches long, with a hang point 60,372 miles
          and 2944 feet (exactly!) from the end.



          That is assuming that you use standard aluminum tubing with an outer
          diameter of 2.00 inches and an inner diameter of 1.750 inches (i.e., wall
          thickness of 0.125 inches) open on both ends. Now you might want to use
          somewhat thicker tubing or make it out of a different material (do we have
          enough aluminum on this planet?), but that would change the calculation of
          length and hang point (doh!).

          And I would be very careful where you hang it. For instance, if you hung it
          from the moon, it would bump into the earth occasionally. Plus, it would be
          hard to hear in space. I suppose you could wrap it around the earth eleven
          times or so to keep it in the atmosphere, but wouldn't you have to grow
          really big ears?



          -Tom Meier

          Fairfax, VA, etc.





          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bbshop/message/105329;_ylc=X3oDMTJzYmVxaGNiBF
          9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzEwOTYxNzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDI0MDU0BG1zZ0lkAzEwNTMyOQ
          RzZWMDZG1zZwRzbGsDdm1zZwRzdGltZQMxMzQ5MzgyMjQx> Re: Lowest known Bb pitch
          pipe in the universe & other music trivia


          Thu Oct 4, 2012 11:35 am (PDT) . Posted by:



          <mailto:b.laurence@...?subject=Re%3A%20Lowest%20known%20Bb%20pitch%20pip
          e%20in%20the%20universe%20%26%20other%20music%20trivia> "Bert Laurence"
          bass2444


          >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
          > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
          > the Perseus Galaxy.
          > ...
          >
          http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesou
          nds/
          > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
          > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
          > for at least 2.5 Billion years...

          Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
          How long would the chime be?

          Inquiring minds want to know!!

          Bert





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • nlstarks@yahoo.com
          You guys are hilarious...and I love it! :) Sent from my iPad
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
            You guys are hilarious...and I love it! :)

            Sent from my iPad
          • Tim Fagan
            A few light years, at least. From: Bert Laurence Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 2:35 PM To: bbshop list BS harmonet
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
              A few light years, at least.

              From: Bert Laurence <b.laurence@...>
              Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 2:35 PM
              To: bbshop list BS harmonet <bbshop@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
              music trivia






              >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
              > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
              > the Perseus Galaxy.
              > ...
              >
              http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesounds/
              > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
              > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
              > for at least 2.5 Billion years...

              Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
              How long would the chime be?

              Inquiring minds want to know!!

              Bert









              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • MICHAEL MORAN
              My question is can we then get other that vibrate to make a four part chord? From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
                My question is can we then get other that vibrate to make a four part chord?



                From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Tom Meier
                Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 05:14 PM
                To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
                music trivia







                According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm

                and using their "Cord Calculator" [sic],

                the length of a tube for that 10 million year B-flat would be:

                269,028 miles 3114 feet and 8 inches long, with a hang point 60,372 miles
                and 2944 feet (exactly!) from the end.

                That is assuming that you use standard aluminum tubing with an outer
                diameter of 2.00 inches and an inner diameter of 1.750 inches (i.e., wall
                thickness of 0.125 inches) open on both ends. Now you might want to use
                somewhat thicker tubing or make it out of a different material (do we have
                enough aluminum on this planet?), but that would change the calculation of
                length and hang point (doh!).

                And I would be very careful where you hang it. For instance, if you hung it
                from the moon, it would bump into the earth occasionally. Plus, it would be
                hard to hear in space. I suppose you could wrap it around the earth eleven
                times or so to keep it in the atmosphere, but wouldn't you have to grow
                really big ears?

                -Tom Meier

                Fairfax, VA, etc.

                <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bbshop/message/105329;_ylc=X3oDMTJzYmVxaGNiBF
                9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzEwOTYxNzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDI0MDU0BG1zZ0lkAzEwNTMyOQ
                RzZWMDZG1zZwRzbGsDdm1zZwRzdGltZQMxMzQ5MzgyMjQx> Re: Lowest known Bb pitch
                pipe in the universe & other music trivia

                Thu Oct 4, 2012 11:35 am (PDT) . Posted by:

                <mailto:b.laurence@... <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net>
                ?subject=Re%3A%20Lowest%20known%20Bb%20pitch%20pip
                e%20in%20the%20universe%20%26%20other%20music%20trivia> "Bert Laurence"
                bass2444

                >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                > the Perseus Galaxy.
                > ...
                >
                http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesou
                nds/
                > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                > for at least 2.5 Billion years...

                Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
                How long would the chime be?

                Inquiring minds want to know!!

                Bert

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • MICHAEL MORAN
                How did the galaxy tank-up before starting that note? From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim Fagan Sent: Thursday,
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
                  How did the galaxy tank-up before starting that note?





                  From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                  Tim Fagan
                  Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 05:31 PM
                  To: Bert Laurence; bbshop list BS harmonet
                  Subject: Re: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
                  music trivia





                  A few light years, at least.

                  From: Bert Laurence <b.laurence@... <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net> >
                  Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 2:35 PM
                  To: bbshop list BS harmonet <bbshop@yahoogroups.com
                  <mailto:bbshop%40yahoogroups.com> >
                  Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
                  music trivia

                  >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                  > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                  > the Perseus Galaxy.
                  > ...
                  >
                  http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesou
                  nds/
                  > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                  > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                  > for at least 2.5 Billion years...

                  Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
                  How long would the chime be?

                  Inquiring minds want to know!!

                  Bert

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Keith Mc
                  ... LOL! That s funny... But unfortunately, there are also other unspoken assumptions in that calculator, like air composition and density being equal
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
                    Tom Meier <harmonytom@...> wrote:
                    > According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm
                    > and using their "Cord Calculator" [sic],
                    > the length of a tube for that 10 million year B-flat would be:
                    > 269,028 miles 3114 feet and 8 inches long, with a hang
                    > point 60,372 miles and 2944 feet (exactly!) from the end.
                    > [assuming 2"dia aluminum tubing, with ID=1.750, etc...]
                    > [be careful how you hang it...]

                    LOL! That's funny...

                    But unfortunately, there are also other unspoken assumptions in
                    that calculator, like air composition and density being equal
                    throughout the tube. At THOSE lengths, even if you COULD
                    "hang it" vertically on some theoretically large gas giant planet,
                    the difference in atmosphere, and density variations from top
                    to bottom all need to be taken into account. It'd take a
                    new calculator, and knowing about the gas giant's atmosphere,
                    to even try to take a guess at it. (and I for one never studied
                    THAT "physics and air acoustics" math.)

                    Bottom line - I think Tom has shown that it would be a "darn
                    hard thing" to make an acoustical chime at that pitch "locally". <grin>

                    HOWEVER, you COULD easily make an electronic waveform generator
                    or microprocessor perform the waveform function, and have
                    it slowly wave a surface with a transducer.

                    But WHY? No one could "hear" it anyway...

                    BTW - In the real world, acoustical sensors for ultra low frequency
                    sounds DO exist. Very useful devices. Their uses include seismic
                    measurements such as listening for (and triangulating the location
                    of) exploding big ordinance anywhere on the planet, to "hear"
                    plate tectonic and mountain movements, and locating undersea objects.

                    They also "listen in" on the "singing" of bridges, ships, and other
                    large scale man made objects. Large objects DO oscillate, flex,
                    and "sing" a LOT at very low pitches. The change in the "tune"
                    over time tells you a lot about failures in the object's structure, etc.
                    It is like ringing a bell. When the bell clunks or chimes differently
                    than it did before, you know something has structurally changed in it.
                    (IOW, their biggest uses include detecting earthquakes, tsunamis,
                    bomb test ban violations, and structure failures.)

                    But all of THOSE uses are still orders of magnitude higher "pitches"
                    than the Super Low Note cited above.

                    - Keith Mc.
                    <sung> "Bells Are Ringing, for me and my Galleon..."
                  • AnastasioRossi
                    Some interesting thoughts on the Lowest Known Bb in The Universe: Middle C (261.63 Hz) has a wave length of 1.3 meters, or 4.3 feet. That means one cycle of
                    Message 9 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
                      Some interesting thoughts on the Lowest Known Bb in The Universe:

                      Middle C (261.63 Hz) has a wave length of 1.3 meters, or 4.3 feet.

                      That means one cycle of Middle C measures 4.3 feet - peak to peak.

                      It also means 261 cycles enter your ear each second, which your brain
                      interprets as the sound of midlle C.

                      The article says the Perseus "Sound Wave" is 57 octaves below middle C
                      (a million billion times below the limit of human hearing).

                      This is so ridiculously low, it is impossible to even imagine!

                      Some facts: Each octave down halves the frequency, and doubles the wave
                      length.

                      If you double Middle C's wavelength 57 times, the resultant wavelength
                      is
                      30,000 light years wide, or 176,358,766,237,440,000 (176+ quadrillion)
                      miles.

                      Prof Steve Allen, of the Institute of Astronomy and a co-investigator in
                      the research, says The speed of sound in the X-ray emitting gas, which
                      depends on its temperature, will be in the of order 1000 km/s (2,236,936
                      mph).

                      At that rate, even if there were an "ear" sensitive to a frequency that
                      low, it would take about 9 million years just to receive ONE CYCLE!

                      How can a vibration that is a million billion times below the limit of
                      human hearing be called a "sound wave"?

                      We don't call electromagnetic vibrations "light waves" when they are far
                      below the visible spectrum.

                      They are called radio waves, microwaves, etc., not "light" or "light
                      waves".

                      So, does it make sense to call the Perseus ripples "sound waves"?

                      ************************************************************************\
                      *****


                      --- In bbshop@yahoogroups.com, Keith Mc <acti@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > (Music trivia... Impress your friends... ;-)
                      >
                      > What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                      > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                      > the Perseus Galaxy.
                      > ...
                      http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackhol\
                      esounds/
                      >
                      > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                      > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                      > for at least 2.5 Billion years... (Talk about a sustained tune up!)
                      >
                      > Just think of it as a Celestial Barbershop Pitch Pipe, blowing
                      > good 'ol Bb to get ready for a heavenly round of Wild Irish Rose.
                      <grin>
                      > (...and heaven help us all, when the actual song starts up! ;-)
                      >
                      > BTW... The Facebook group "I [freaking] love science" even
                      > has a single frame cartoon about it, at:
                      > ...
                      http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/644527_233903270068441_193997\
                      8970_n.jpg
                      >
                      > Other tonal trivia: In Jan 2002, Tim Storms reclaimed his Guinness
                      > World Record for the lowest musical note produced with the
                      > human voice. The record is now set to 0.189 Hz, or G-7, well
                      > below normal human hearing:
                      > ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Storms
                      > Earlier coverage, and some YouTube clips of him singing:
                      > ... http://www.noiseaddicts.com/2009/04/extremes-of-human-voice/
                      >
                      > - Keith Mc.
                      > "...and you thought YOUR quartet's Bass could sing low notes???"
                      >


                      --- In bbshop@yahoogroups.com, "MICHAEL MORAN" <michael754@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > How did the galaxy tank-up before starting that note?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      Of
                      > Tim Fagan
                      > Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 05:31 PM
                      > To: Bert Laurence; bbshop list BS harmonet
                      > Subject: Re: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe &
                      other
                      > music trivia
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > A few light years, at least.
                      >
                      > From: Bert Laurence b.laurence@... <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net> >
                      > Date: Thursday, October 4, 2012 2:35 PM
                      > To: bbshop list BS harmonet bbshop@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:bbshop%40yahoogroups.com> >
                      > Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe &
                      other
                      > music trivia
                      >
                      > >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                      > > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                      > > the Perseus Galaxy.
                      > > ...
                      > >
                      >
                      http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackhol\
                      esou
                      > nds/
                      > > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                      > > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                      > > for at least 2.5 Billion years...
                      >
                      > Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this
                      tone?
                      > How long would the chime be?
                      >
                      > Inquiring minds want to know!!
                      >
                      > Bert
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Keith Mc
                      ... Uh, as I said, it s a black hole, out in space... It tanked up by eating a bunch of stars in its neighborhood . (As Hawking showed, black holes aren t
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 5, 2012
                        MICHAEL MORAN <michael754@...> wrote:
                        > How did the galaxy tank-up before starting that note?

                        Uh, as I said, it's a black hole, out in space... It "tanked up"
                        by eating a bunch of stars in its "neighborhood". (As Hawking
                        showed, black holes aren't really "black". They emit energy all the time.)

                        > My question is can we then get other that vibrate to make a four part chord?

                        Make three other black holes, and "tune" them to match that octave???
                        Gee, if you can figure out how to do THAT ("safely" of course ;-)
                        I'd be REALLY impressed... <grin>

                        But if you're honestly asking about making a set of real wind
                        chimes for your backyard, DUCK... That has been talked to death
                        many times over the years. It's one of the few "touchy subjects"
                        to bring up here on the list again.
                        My honest advice: Google "barbershop wind chimes", or check
                        out the group's archives, for complete instructions.
                        Google gives you this hit at the top, a compendium of instructions:
                        ... http://arneberg.com/harmonet/threads/windchimes.html

                        My $0.02... Be aware you REALLY don't want to make a BBS 7th
                        windchime, as it NEVER RESOLVES. Trust me on this... Even for
                        BBS nuts like me, it can drive you MORE nuts. IMHO it's MUCH
                        nicer to hear your favorite 4 note major "tuneup" chord [for
                        instance Bb or F for the men], so you can take a pitch & sing.

                        Good luck! (...making a chime, or making the black holes... Either one... ;-)

                        - Keith Mc.
                        <sung> "It's a barbershop note in our neighborhood, ..."
                      • Michael Moran
                        The vibration would probably damage your internal organs. Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Message 11 of 18 , Oct 5, 2012
                          The vibration would probably damage your internal organs.

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          On Oct 4, 2012, at 6:20 PM, "MICHAEL MORAN" <michael754@...> wrote:

                          > My question is can we then get other that vibrate to make a four part chord?
                          >
                          > From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                          > Tom Meier
                          > Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 05:14 PM
                          > To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
                          > music trivia
                          >
                          > According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm
                          >
                          > and using their "Cord Calculator" [sic],
                          >
                          > the length of a tube for that 10 million year B-flat would be:
                          >
                          > 269,028 miles 3114 feet and 8 inches long, with a hang point 60,372 miles
                          > and 2944 feet (exactly!) from the end.
                          >
                          > That is assuming that you use standard aluminum tubing with an outer
                          > diameter of 2.00 inches and an inner diameter of 1.750 inches (i.e., wall
                          > thickness of 0.125 inches) open on both ends. Now you might want to use
                          > somewhat thicker tubing or make it out of a different material (do we have
                          > enough aluminum on this planet?), but that would change the calculation of
                          > length and hang point (doh!).
                          >
                          > And I would be very careful where you hang it. For instance, if you hung it
                          > from the moon, it would bump into the earth occasionally. Plus, it would be
                          > hard to hear in space. I suppose you could wrap it around the earth eleven
                          > times or so to keep it in the atmosphere, but wouldn't you have to grow
                          > really big ears?
                          >
                          > -Tom Meier
                          >
                          > Fairfax, VA, etc.
                          >
                          > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bbshop/message/105329;_ylc=X3oDMTJzYmVxaGNiBF
                          > 9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzEwOTYxNzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDI0MDU0BG1zZ0lkAzEwNTMyOQ
                          > RzZWMDZG1zZwRzbGsDdm1zZwRzdGltZQMxMzQ5MzgyMjQx> Re: Lowest known Bb pitch
                          > pipe in the universe & other music trivia
                          >
                          > Thu Oct 4, 2012 11:35 am (PDT) . Posted by:
                          >
                          > <mailto:b.laurence@... <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net>
                          > ?subject=Re%3A%20Lowest%20known%20Bb%20pitch%20pip
                          > e%20in%20the%20universe%20%26%20other%20music%20trivia> "Bert Laurence"
                          > bass2444
                          >
                          > >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                          > > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                          > > the Perseus Galaxy.
                          > > ...
                          > >
                          > http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesou
                          > nds/
                          > > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                          > > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                          > > for at least 2.5 Billion years...
                          >
                          > Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
                          > How long would the chime be?
                          >
                          > Inquiring minds want to know!!
                          >
                          > Bert
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Jeff Buckles
                          ... This is proven by the fact that you would die while the wave is passing through you. :) -- Jeff Buckles -- Aloha, OR, USA
                          Message 12 of 18 , Oct 5, 2012
                            On 10/5/2012 5:20 AM, Michael Moran wrote:
                            > The vibration would probably damage your internal organs.

                            This is proven by the fact that you would die
                            while the wave is passing through you. :)

                            -- Jeff Buckles
                            -- Aloha, OR, USA



                            On 10/5/2012 5:20 AM, Michael Moran wrote:
                            > The vibration would probably damage your internal organs.
                            >
                            > Sent from my iPhone
                            >
                            > On Oct 4, 2012, at 6:20 PM, "MICHAEL MORAN" <michael754@...
                            > <mailto:michael754%40verizon.net>> wrote:
                            >
                            > > My question is can we then get other that vibrate to make a four part
                            > chord?
                            > >
                            > > From: bbshop@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bbshop%40yahoogroups.com>
                            > [mailto:bbshop@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bbshop%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                            > Behalf Of
                            > > Tom Meier
                            > > Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 05:14 PM
                            > > To: bbshop@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bbshop%40yahoogroups.com>
                            > > Subject: [bbshop] Re: Lowest known Bb pitch pipe in the universe & other
                            > > music trivia
                            > >
                            > > According to the web site, http://home.fuse.net/engineering/Chimes.htm
                            > >
                            > > and using their "Cord Calculator" [sic],
                            > >
                            > > the length of a tube for that 10 million year B-flat would be:
                            > >
                            > > 269,028 miles 3114 feet and 8 inches long, with a hang point 60,372 miles
                            > > and 2944 feet (exactly!) from the end.
                            > >
                            > > That is assuming that you use standard aluminum tubing with an outer
                            > > diameter of 2.00 inches and an inner diameter of 1.750 inches (i.e., wall
                            > > thickness of 0.125 inches) open on both ends. Now you might want to use
                            > > somewhat thicker tubing or make it out of a different material (do we
                            > have
                            > > enough aluminum on this planet?), but that would change the
                            > calculation of
                            > > length and hang point (doh!).
                            > >
                            > > And I would be very careful where you hang it. For instance, if you
                            > hung it
                            > > from the moon, it would bump into the earth occasionally. Plus, it
                            > would be
                            > > hard to hear in space. I suppose you could wrap it around the earth
                            > eleven
                            > > times or so to keep it in the atmosphere, but wouldn't you have to grow
                            > > really big ears?
                            > >
                            > > -Tom Meier
                            > >
                            > > Fairfax, VA, etc.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bbshop/message/105329;_ylc=X3oDMTJzYmVxaGNiBF
                            > >
                            > 9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzEwOTYxNzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDI0MDU0BG1zZ0lkAzEwNTMyOQ
                            > > RzZWMDZG1zZwRzbGsDdm1zZwRzdGltZQMxMzQ5MzgyMjQx> Re: Lowest known Bb pitch
                            > > pipe in the universe & other music trivia
                            > >
                            > > Thu Oct 4, 2012 11:35 am (PDT) . Posted by:
                            > >
                            > > <mailto:b.laurence@... <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net>
                            > <mailto:b.laurence%40gte.net>
                            > > ?subject=Re%3A%20Lowest%20known%20Bb%20pitch%20pip
                            > > e%20in%20the%20universe%20%26%20other%20music%20trivia> "Bert Laurence"
                            > > bass2444
                            > >
                            > > >What is believed to be the lowest known sustained musical note
                            > > > in the universe is caused by the rumbling of a black hole in
                            > > > the Perseus Galaxy.
                            > > > ...
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/09sep_blackholesou
                            > > nds/
                            > > > What I find cool is that it is a *** B FLAT ***, 57 octaves
                            > > > below middle C, and has been rumbling constantly at that pitch
                            > > > for at least 2.5 Billion years...
                            > >
                            > > Can a chime for the famous barbershop wind chimes be cut for this tone?
                            > > How long would the chime be?
                            > >
                            > > Inquiring minds want to know!!
                            > >
                            > > Bert
                            > >
                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
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