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Re: [bbshop] Re: Chapters who don't compete

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  • Mark Schuldenfrei
    ... I m a long-term participant in an advisory committee to the board of directors of another hobby non-profit. If you don t mind, I ll share a lot of opinion
    Message 1 of 51 , Feb 23, 2012
      Scott Zumbrum wrote:
      > Maybe a simpler solution to this would be to ask these "lone wolves" WHY
      > they aren't card holding members (I'm presuming we're past the Frank
      > Thorne members)?

      I'm a long-term participant in an advisory committee to the
      board of directors of another hobby non-profit. If you don't
      mind, I'll share a lot of opinion on this with you, formed
      after years of discussions.

      First: a quick digression. When I took a contract law class many
      years ago, the professor said that "all commerce is based upon a
      disagreement in values. The store vendor values your dollar more
      than his banana, and you value the banana more than your dollar.
      The transaction resolves the disagreement in value."

      That's really, truly, the core issue of membership and gaining
      members. If someone values membership more than the money they
      have, they will trade money for membership. If they don't, they
      won't.

      It's really that simple. Provide them enough value that they
      will pay for it.

      The difficulties are that people have their own stories. A
      single man making 100,000 dollars has a very different value
      equation than a family man who has lost his job. People may
      think that what their chapter or barbershop provide is not
      needed, or important, or worth the money.

      Whatever. (As the kids say.) The lessons to remember are
      these:
      1. Provide value. (I think overall we do a good job.)
      2. Sell that value, so everyone knows it is there. (I think we
      did a poor job on me, at first, but I see more over time as
      I learn more.)
      3. Don't hector people to change their value system.

      That last is really important. If I'm valuing my Harley
      more than my singing [1], and you holler at me that my
      priorities are messed up, I may ride that hog away.

      Find a way to make people appreciate the value, and to recognize
      that the best way to get that value and keep it coming, is to
      pay what that value is worth.

      Because we set a minimum dollar figure on membership, we
      require people to make that value decision. If they choose
      to not make that decision by joining, don't be at all surprised
      if they try to keep the things they still value, but at a
      lower cost.

      Some people may, by whatever definition you use personally,
      Cheat. That's their morals and values at work. You may
      disapprove of it, and that's OK. But you can't change their
      moral character or value system through anger or confrontation.

      There's all I know. Membership is a value proposition, and some
      will purchase, and some will not, and the thing to do is make
      it attractive, and try to change the value proposition for those
      that don't purchase: in ways that can work.

      Mark Schuldenfrei

      [1] I don't have a Harley. As fun as it might be, I don't
      value it enough to buy one. Which is my point, I think. :-)
    • Stephen Rafe
      Hi All -- I wish to publicly thank Jeremey Johnson for the beautiful sensitivity with which he musically captured the total emotions of my poem, I Never Can
      Message 51 of 51 , Apr 12, 2012
        Hi All --

        I wish to publicly thank Jeremey Johnson for the beautiful sensitivity with which he musically captured the total emotions of my poem, "I Never Can Say Goodbye." I have read it at the memorial services for my youngest and oldest sons and since then it has been read at other memorial services including one of the 9-11 services in New York City this past year. The barbershopper who read it responded concerning his own emotions and the audience's reactions when reading it: "Well I barely got through your poem, 'I Never Can say Goodbye.' It blew everyone away and set them up for the rest of the memorial service."

        Jeremey's music and arrangement for this piece for barbershop will certainly stir the deepest feelings in all who hear it. You may want to include it for all types of memorial occasions including Memorial Day, Flag Day, and Veteran's Day as well as for all other events where a life is being remembered. The entire song can heard in full mix at
        http://highnotepublishing.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=136

        If that long link doesn't work for you, please try this shorter one
        http://tinyurl.com/772jjaq

        Simon Rylander has produced the learning tracks and they are awesome. They are available at his website:
        http://www.sunshinetracks.com/learning_tracks.htm

        With appreciation --

        Stephen
        STEPHEN RAFE


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