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Re: Windlass-Redux

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  • Dennis
    I did remember something, I am old so have patience. After the nuts and washers were glued together, I glued them to the tips of my fingers so I could read
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 1, 2013
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      I did remember something, I am old so have patience. After the nuts and washers were glued together, I glued them to the tips of my fingers so I could read the bolts, it worked.

      --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "davidhipschman" <davidhipschman@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am looking for any advice and or photos about installing a windlass on our 1983 Bayfield 32C. I just ordered a Lofrans Kobra and have decided to do the install myself (after several not so great experiences have boat work done via my checkbook).
      >
      > This is the biggest boat job I have ever contemplated so I am feeling some trepidation.
      >
      > My plan is to abandon the existing hawse hole, which is in a useless location, and drill a new hole in the deck along with the bolt holes, and use a large aluminum backing plate/stiffener. I will epoxy the holes to seal the deck as well as caulk the entire installation. Also plan to install windlass-specific battery under the V-berth and run a charging wire aft.
      > I'd be grateful for any advice.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > David Hipschman
      > S/V Piper
      > St Augustine, Florida
      >
    • somaspack
      Hi Dave, I installed a Maxwell windlass in our B29 last year. I spent several years thinking through the installation before getting all the details resolved.
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 1, 2013
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        Hi Dave,

        I installed a Maxwell windlass in our B29 last year. I spent several years thinking through the installation before getting all the details resolved. I'm planning to post some pictures and a narrative soon.

        When considering battery placement, electrical/cabling is the second highest expense, the windlass being the first. You should use a cable size that minimizes the voltage loss below 10% and ideally in the 3-5% range. Depending, it may be more cost effective to place the battery aft. Nigel Calder writes extensively about windlass installation in his book - 'Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual'. I'd recommend that as a good resource to help plan.

        A windlass is a very nice addition. Good luck!

        Scott
        B29 #17 Jolah

        --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "davidhipschman" <davidhipschman@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am looking for any advice and or photos about installing a windlass on our 1983 Bayfield 32C. I just ordered a Lofrans Kobra and have decided to do the install myself (after several not so great experiences have boat work done via my checkbook).
        >
        > This is the biggest boat job I have ever contemplated so I am feeling some trepidation.
        >
        > My plan is to abandon the existing hawse hole, which is in a useless location, and drill a new hole in the deck along with the bolt holes, and use a large aluminum backing plate/stiffener. I will epoxy the holes to seal the deck as well as caulk the entire installation. Also plan to install windlass-specific battery under the V-berth and run a charging wire aft.
        > I'd be grateful for any advice.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > David Hipschman
        > S/V Piper
        > St Augustine, Florida
        >
      • seacheese
        Hi Dave, That is a good windlass and should work out great for that boat. On my former boat (87 B32c) I installed an old Maxwell-Nillsen windlass, which had
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 1, 2013
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          Hi Dave,

          That is a good windlass and should work out great for that boat.

          On my former boat (87 B32c) I installed an old Maxwell-Nillsen windlass, which had some problems. Other than what you indicated your going to do, I did the following (plus my 2 cents):

          1. Put in a fairly 1/4 thick Stainless Steel backing plate (actually that was overkill as the deck was 1'' thick in the bow)

          2. I put a platform (plywood) the same shape as the the horizontal shape of the chain locker so the chain would not make its way down to the where vent pipe for the holding tank comes out. The platform rose about a third of the way up from the door to the chain locker on a horizontal plane. Since the Hausi-Hole was at the bow end of the boat, the 134 feet BB chain would bunch up in the front, so I decided to run some PVC pipe from the Hausi, Hole to the aft end of the chain locker as the BB chain would bunch up in the bow end of the platform I put in the chain locker. This was not a great solution as the chain would sometimes bunch up in the pipe after piling up on the platform. and I would need to undo the pipe to get the chain out... I never did come up with a solution to this issue before I sold the boat, as I would have to run up to the chain locker and 'smooth' out the chain every time I pulled up the anchor for everything to work right.


          3. I did not have the space for a battery under the v birth, because of all the thru hulls, so I ran 0 (1/0) AWG wire from the house battery, to a high amp ON/Off Switch under the aft quarter birth Wall. Then ran it to the v birth, where I put the Lewmar windlass solenoid switch, Then 1 AWG wire to the forward power pole and 0 (1/0) AWG wire (note: The Windlass did not have any switching on-board.)

          4. I also put in a Johnson wireless remote ($99 on ebay - and I bought two...redundancy) for the Lewmar windlass solenoid switching. This worked out quite well, as when I single handed, I could run back and forth between the wheel and the bow and control the windlass as I was moving about or getting out of the way of the chain. (Note: My past experience with deck foot switches is not that great, as they leak, become another hole that you need run wires to and occasionally need to clean and repair.)

          I advise filling up the holes with epoxy, cover and let it dry for a couple days and then drill the holes out again. Trying to use a liquid syringe and get the epoxy in all the areas where the coring was is a pain and I just decided it was better just to fill them up with epoxy... However Before you put the epoxy in, get putty from a craft store to plug up the bottom of the holes around the fiberglass because the epoxy will find its way out, even if you have the bottom well taped and covered.

          I noticed that the chain locker in mine was a little beat up because of the chain sliding about. I was going to put some polypropylene, from an old fuel tank, on the sides of the locker to reduce the damage but never did before I sold the boat.

          From my experience, putting a lot of chain up on the bow, a couple of anchors and a half full holding tank does make you have a longer water line and the boat goes faster. However, it puts the bow sprit into waves more often.

          I am sure are aware of the but use a double chain snubber with a rope and tie them off on the port and Starboard cleats as you don't want to put pressure on the bow sprit, as it will pull your anchor loose when a wave hits the nose. However, you should run a line down to keep the ropes high enough to not get caught up in the bow sprit stay.



          Brad C.

          Chimi-Changa (83-B25)
          St. Petersburg, FL


          --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "davidhipschman" <davidhipschman@...> wrote:
          >
          > I am looking for any advice and or photos about installing a windlass on our 1983 Bayfield 32C. I just ordered a Lofrans Kobra and have decided to do the install myself (after several not so great experiences have boat work done via my checkbook).
          >
          > This is the biggest boat job I have ever contemplated so I am feeling some trepidation.
          >
          > My plan is to abandon the existing hawse hole, which is in a useless location, and drill a new hole in the deck along with the bolt holes, and use a large aluminum backing plate/stiffener. I will epoxy the holes to seal the deck as well as caulk the entire installation. Also plan to install windlass-specific battery under the V-berth and run a charging wire aft.
          > I'd be grateful for any advice.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > David Hipschman
          > S/V Piper
          > St Augustine, Florida
          >
        • seacheese
          I forgot to mention that because I had a platform, I was able to use the existing Hausi-Hole for the 150 chain and rope rode I used for my second anchor and
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 2, 2013
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            I forgot to mention that because I had a platform, I was able to use the existing Hausi-Hole for the 150' chain and rope rode I used for my second anchor and store it below the platform.

            Brad C.

            --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "seacheese" <seacheese@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Dave,
            >
            > That is a good windlass and should work out great for that boat.
            >
            > On my former boat (87 B32c) I installed an old Maxwell-Nillsen windlass, which had some problems. Other than what you indicated your going to do, I did the following (plus my 2 cents):
            >
            > 1. Put in a fairly 1/4 thick Stainless Steel backing plate (actually that was overkill as the deck was 1'' thick in the bow)
            >
            > 2. I put a platform (plywood) the same shape as the the horizontal shape of the chain locker so the chain would not make its way down to the where vent pipe for the holding tank comes out. The platform rose about a third of the way up from the door to the chain locker on a horizontal plane. Since the Hausi-Hole was at the bow end of the boat, the 134 feet BB chain would bunch up in the front, so I decided to run some PVC pipe from the Hausi, Hole to the aft end of the chain locker as the BB chain would bunch up in the bow end of the platform I put in the chain locker. This was not a great solution as the chain would sometimes bunch up in the pipe after piling up on the platform. and I would need to undo the pipe to get the chain out... I never did come up with a solution to this issue before I sold the boat, as I would have to run up to the chain locker and 'smooth' out the chain every time I pulled up the anchor for everything to work right.
            >
            >
            > 3. I did not have the space for a battery under the v birth, because of all the thru hulls, so I ran 0 (1/0) AWG wire from the house battery, to a high amp ON/Off Switch under the aft quarter birth Wall. Then ran it to the v birth, where I put the Lewmar windlass solenoid switch, Then 1 AWG wire to the forward power pole and 0 (1/0) AWG wire (note: The Windlass did not have any switching on-board.)
            >
            > 4. I also put in a Johnson wireless remote ($99 on ebay - and I bought two...redundancy) for the Lewmar windlass solenoid switching. This worked out quite well, as when I single handed, I could run back and forth between the wheel and the bow and control the windlass as I was moving about or getting out of the way of the chain. (Note: My past experience with deck foot switches is not that great, as they leak, become another hole that you need run wires to and occasionally need to clean and repair.)
            >
            > I advise filling up the holes with epoxy, cover and let it dry for a couple days and then drill the holes out again. Trying to use a liquid syringe and get the epoxy in all the areas where the coring was is a pain and I just decided it was better just to fill them up with epoxy... However Before you put the epoxy in, get putty from a craft store to plug up the bottom of the holes around the fiberglass because the epoxy will find its way out, even if you have the bottom well taped and covered.
            >
            > I noticed that the chain locker in mine was a little beat up because of the chain sliding about. I was going to put some polypropylene, from an old fuel tank, on the sides of the locker to reduce the damage but never did before I sold the boat.
            >
            > From my experience, putting a lot of chain up on the bow, a couple of anchors and a half full holding tank does make you have a longer water line and the boat goes faster. However, it puts the bow sprit into waves more often.
            >
            > I am sure are aware of the but use a double chain snubber with a rope and tie them off on the port and Starboard cleats as you don't want to put pressure on the bow sprit, as it will pull your anchor loose when a wave hits the nose. However, you should run a line down to keep the ropes high enough to not get caught up in the bow sprit stay.
            >
            >
            >
            > Brad C.
            >
            > Chimi-Changa (83-B25)
            > St. Petersburg, FL
            >
            >
            > --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "davidhipschman" <davidhipschman@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I am looking for any advice and or photos about installing a windlass on our 1983 Bayfield 32C. I just ordered a Lofrans Kobra and have decided to do the install myself (after several not so great experiences have boat work done via my checkbook).
            > >
            > > This is the biggest boat job I have ever contemplated so I am feeling some trepidation.
            > >
            > > My plan is to abandon the existing hawse hole, which is in a useless location, and drill a new hole in the deck along with the bolt holes, and use a large aluminum backing plate/stiffener. I will epoxy the holes to seal the deck as well as caulk the entire installation. Also plan to install windlass-specific battery under the V-berth and run a charging wire aft.
            > > I'd be grateful for any advice.
            > >
            > > Thanks,
            > >
            > > David Hipschman
            > > S/V Piper
            > > St Augustine, Florida
            > >
            >
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