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Re: Raising the boom on a B25

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  • DaveS
    You might want to check inside the mast head for another notch to put the sheave spindle for the topping lift. On my 1981 Cinkel mast there are two spots for
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 6, 2012
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      You might want to check inside the mast head for another notch to put the sheave spindle for the topping lift. On my 1981 Cinkel mast there are two spots for the sheave spindle to sit. One higher than the next. The higher one is closer to the backstay. That's one adjustment I will make when I tune the rig in the Spring.

      best regards


      --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "gimli70i" <gimli70i@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am in the process of making a sliding gooseneck for my B25 and will post pictures when it comes back from the machinest.
      > Glen on B25 Whitecap in Gimli Manitoba Canada
      >
      > --- In bayfieldyachts@yahoogroups.com, "bcaward" <bcaward@> wrote:
      > >
      > > This may be an old topic, so I hope you long-timers will indulge me.
      > >
      > > I have about 12 inches of room at the top of my mast with the main fully hoisted, and so could probably raise my boom 9 inches or so without causing trouble. The roach on my main is gentle enough so that it will still clear the backstay at the higher set. This would make for less ducking during gybes, and more general roominess. I've often wondered why the gooseneck was set so low in the first place.
      > >
      > > Then while experimenting with it in the higher position (just holding it there), I noticed that there is one angle, around 45 degrees up, where it does encounter the backstay on its way through - theoretically bad news.
      > >
      > > I also noticed that the place it is now - its original location - is actually as high as it can go and still clear the backstay at this extreme angle. And I began to wonder if this is the reason they put it there and not higher.
      > >
      > > I've noted that a few of you have raised your booms. Is this boom-swiping-backstay-and-possibly-losing-the-rig consideration enough of a possibility that this is not a good idea, or am I overthinking this?
      > >
      > > In a heavy sea, is there ever likely to be enough bouncing around that in an accidental gybe (or maybe a broach) that boom would be up at that extreme angle and whack the backstay? Seems like I would always be worrying about it.
      > >
      > > Thanks for your thoughts,
      > >
      > > Bruce Caward
      > > B25 Yoshimi
      > > Cayuga Lake
      > > Ithaca, NY
      > >
      >
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