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Re: Gaeilge Terminology (was: Re: [bata] Re: Introduction and Training report)

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  • Ken Pfrenger
    On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 02:25:43 -0700 (PDT), c.l. vermeers ... Chris is extremely correct! This is the most common thing I see on this list and I have grown weary
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 27, 2004
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      On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 02:25:43 -0700 (PDT), c.l. vermeers
      <whateley23@...> wrote:

      > just some minor corrections:
      >
      > --- Stuart McDermid <s_j_mc@...> wrote:
      >
      >> So far we have:
      >>
      >> BATA (batuh) The art we are practicing here. :)
      >
      > heh. actually, the bata is the stick itself. the art would be, i
      > believe, "batairíocht" (note the acute over the second 'i'). i'd do the
      > pronunciation as (bat@), where '@' is the schwa sound.

      Chris is extremely correct! This is the most common thing I see on this
      list and I have grown weary of correcting it:) I have been using a
      different term for my Irish martial arts(A point that Mr Hurley and myself
      have disagreed about) but even though I still think it is correct, just
      for the sake of having less confusion I will be usingt he same term that
      John Hurley uses....Bataireacht. Check out his page for more terms in
      Irish: http://www.johnwhurley.com/hurleyframeset-2.html
      And yes the 'uh' should be the shwa which is shown as @ or an upside down
      'e'.


      >
      >> As for postures, I know of only three for bata. Right foot forward,
      >> Left foot forward and the Glen Doyle type middle guard. These could
      >> be Right guard, left guard and middle guard respectively.
      >
      > right guard = díon a dheis (dyeen ah dhyesh - where 'dh' is the 'th' of
      > "there")
      >
      > left guard = díon a chlé (dyeen ah chlay - where 'ch' is as in German
      > "ich")
      >
      > middle guard = díon dhélámh (dyeen dhaylarv) - lit. "two-hand guard"

      I am not sure about calling things right and left as far as postures go
      since we have an strangely high number of lefthanders doing this. I
      usually call the strong sideforward the offensive guard and the weak side
      forward the invitational....nothing trad, just my own terms.

      >
      >> If someone could translate these into Gaelic for flavour then that
      >> would be cool.
      >
      > personally, i don't think that it is "for flavor". if the language
      > isn't Gaeilge, then it's just stickfighting with some unusual ways to
      > hold the stick. if it is Gaeilge, then it's Irish Stickfighting, that
      > it is.
      >
      > of course, it isn't as simple as all that, but it's a *lot* harder
      > (some would say "impossible") to pinpoint what about it is Irish if it
      > isn't in Gaeilge.
      >
      > ok, my mini-rant on language is done now. ;)

      Damn gotta hit the road for work......I'll post more on this when I get
      home. I'll just leave it hang at yes....but.....
      Ken
    • c.l. vermeers
      ... excellent! ... céim is more for degree of advancement , though. troigh is more for an actual stepping motion. ... either one would work, i think. i still
      Message 33 of 33 , Aug 30, 2004
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        --- RAMSEY_JOHN <ramsey_john@...> wrote:

        > �seal is low

        excellent!

        > C�im is more normally used for step

        c�im is more for "degree of advancement", though. troigh is more for an
        actual stepping motion.

        > by bar I think you mean a block, I would use "ceap" buille a
        > cheapadh - to ward off a blow for example.

        either one would work, i think. i still prefer "barra".

        > Me�n - better for middle - "Me�nmhe�chan" middleweight

        i chose to emphasize the two-handedness of the ward, rather than the
        fact that it is in the middle, because the two-hand is more important,
        i think.

        > tum is duck or immerse in water not avoid a blow, seachain is
        > definitively the word - Buille a sheachaint - to avoid a blow, it
        > can also mean guard to complicate things

        thanks! as i said, that's what i would prefer.

        c. vermeers
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